Dhammapada: Wisdom of the Buddha translated by Harischandra Kaviratna
Theosophical University Press Online Edition

Affection — CANTO XVI

209. He who gives himself to what is not befitting and thus forgets his own quest; he who indulges in sense pleasures envies the person who exerts himself in meditation.

210. Do not become attached to what is pleasing nor to what is displeasing; not to see what is dear to one is painful, as also is the sight of the unpleasant.

211. Therefore, let no one cherish anything, inasmuch as the loss of what is beloved is hard. There are no fetters for him who knows neither pleasure nor pain.

212. From pleasure arises sorrow; from pleasure arises fear. To him who is free from pleasure there is no sorrow. Whence, then, comes fear?

213. From affection arises sorrow; from affection arises fear. To him who is free from affection there is no sorrow. Whence fear?

214. From attachment arises sorrow; from attachment arises fear. To him who is free from attachment there is no sorrow. Whence fear?

215. From desire arises sorrow, from desire arises fear. To him who is free from desire there is no sorrow. Whence fear?

216. From craving arises sorrow; from craving arises fear. To him who is free from craving there is no sorrow. Whence fear?

217. He who possesses virtue and spiritual insight, who is well established in the Dhamma, who is truthful, who performs his duties, him the people hold dear.

218. He in whom is born a sublime longing for the Ineffable, whose mind is permeated by this longing, whose thoughts are not bewildered by attachment — such a person is called "one bound upstream."

219. When a man who has been away for a long time returns home safely, his kinsmen, friends and well-wishers welcome him gladly.

220. When a man has departed from this world to the next, the effects of his good deeds receive him gladly, even as kinsmen welcome a friend on his return home.


Canto XVII

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