Dhammapada: Wisdom of the Buddha translated by Harischandra Kaviratna
Theosophical University Press Online Edition

The Thousands — CANTO VIII

100. A single word full of meaning, hearing which one becomes at peace, is better than a thousand words which are empty of meaning.

101. A single couplet pregnant with meaning, hearing which one becomes at peace, is better than a thousand couplets composed of meaningless words.

102. One word of the Dhamma, hearing which one becomes at peace, is better than the utterance of a hundred verses which consist of superficial words.

103. Though one were to conquer a million men in battle, that man who conquers himself is the greater victor.

104,105. To overcome one's own self is indeed better than to conquer others.

Neither god nor demigod, nor Mara with Brahma, can undo the victory of him who has subjugated himself and who practices self-restraint.

106. Were a man month after month for a hundred years to offer sacrifices by the thousands, and were he to pay homage even for a moment to one who is self-governed, that homage is superior to the sacrifices of a hundred years.

107. Were a man for a hundred years to tend the sacrificial fire in the forest, and were he to pay homage even for a moment to one who is self-governed, that homage is superior to the fire-sacrifice of a hundred years.

108. Whatever offering or sacrifice a person, who is desirous of gaining merit, may make throughout the course of a year, that is not worth one fourth of the merit acquired by homage paid to one of upright life.

109. In him, who always honors and respects the aged, four conditions will increase: longevity, beauty, happiness and strength.

110. One day's life of an Arhat who is virtuous and contemplative is better than a hundred years of life of one who is dissolute and of uncontrolled mind.

111. One day's life of him who is wise and contemplative is better than a life of a hundred years of one who is unwise and of uncontrolled mind.

112. One day's life of a person who is vigorous and resolute is better than a life of a hundred years of him who is weak and indolent.

113. A single day's life of one who clearly sees the origin and cessation (of all composite things), is better than a hundred years of life of him who does not perceive the origin and cessation of things.

114. A single day's life of one who perceives the immortal state is far better than if one were to live a hundred years without perceiving this state.

115. A single day's life of one who realizes the Sublime Truth is indeed better than a life of a hundred years of one who does not realize the Sublime Truth.


Canto IX

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