The Theosophical Forum – November 1939

H. P. BLAVATSKY SPEAKS FOR HERSELF

H. P. B.'s "Grand Manner" (1)

The signal-fires of the olden times, which, lighted and extinguished by turns upon one hill-top after another, conveyed intelligence along a whole stretch of country, so we see a long line of "wise" men from the beginning of history down to our own times communicating the word of wisdom to their direct successors. Passing from seer to seer, the "Word" flashes out like lightning, and while carrying off the initiator from human sight forever, brings the new initiate into view. Meanwhile, whole nations murder each other in the name of another "Word" an empty substitute accepted literally by each, and misinterpreted by all! — Isis Unveiled, II, 571

We would that all who have a voice in the education of the masses should first know and then teach that the safest guides to human happiness and enlightenment are those writings which have descended to us from the remotest antiquity; and that nobler spiritual aspirations and a higher average morality prevail in the countries where the people take their precepts as the rule of their lives. We would have all to realize that magical, i. e., spiritual powers exist in every man, and those few to practice them who feel called to teach, and are ready to pay the price of discipline and self-conquest which their development exacts.

Many men have arisen who had glimpses of the truth, and fancied they had it all. Such have failed to achieve the good they might have done and sought to do, because vanity has made them thrust their personality into such undue prominence as to interpose it between their believers and the whole truth that lay behind. The world needs no sectarian church, whether of Buddha, Jesus, Mahomet, Swedenborg, Calvin, or any other. There being but ONE Truth, man requires but one church — the Temple of God within us, walled in by matter but penetrable by any one who can find the way; the pure in heart see God.Isis Unveiled, II, 635

As the white ray of light is decomposed by the prism into the various colors of the solar spectrum, so the beam of divine truth, in passing through the three-sided prism of man's nature, has been broken up into vari-colored fragments called RELIGIONS. And, as the rays of the spectrum, by imperceptible shadings, merge into each other, so the great theologies that have appeared at different degrees of divergence from the original source, have been connected by minor schisms, schools, and off-shoots from the one side or the other. Combined, their aggregate represents one eternal truth; separate, they are but shades of human error and the signs of imperfection.

For the purposes of a philosophical analysis, we need not take account of the enormities which have blackened the record of many of the world's religions. True faith is the embodiment of divine charity; those who minister at its altars, are but human. As we turn the blood-stained pages of ecclesiastical history, we find that, whoever may have been the hero, and whatever costumes the actors may have worn, the plot of the tragedy has ever been the same. But the Eternal Night was in and behind it all, and we pass from what we see to that which is invisible to the eye of sense. Our fervent wish has been to show true souls how they may lift aside the curtain, and, in the brightness of that Night made Day, look with undazzled gaze upon the UNVEILED TRUTH. — Isis Unveiled, II, 640

FOOTNOTE:

1. H. P. Blavatsky was a Russian, and in Russia was accepted as one of the literary geniuses of the country. What is perhaps not so well recognized is her high standing as a stylist in English; even in this language her accomplishments are outstanding, her power of literary expression often lifting one to magnificent heights of inspiration. Her great work was to teach, to give anew to the world the Ancient Wisdom-Religion. She was not concerned merely with style or literary form. Yet one cannot fail to recognize and to acknowledge the literary genius that burned behind her words. As witness of this we give a few extracts from her earliest work Isis Unveiled, taken from the last seventy-five pages. Throughout her voluminous writings students may without much effort find similar paragraphs written in "the Grand Manner." — Eds. (return to text)


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