Secret Doctrine References

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References — SD Volume 2


 

— Title Page —

“There is no Religion higher than Truth.”
see: “Introductory”: “There is no religion (or law) higher than truth” — “SATYĀT [Satyān] NĀSTI PARO DHARMAH” — the motto of the Maharajah of Benares, adopted by the Theosophical Society.” — SD 1:xli
see: Mahabharata, “Çanti Parva” [tr. K. M. Ganguli], 1890: “There is no duty which is higher than Truth . . .” — p. 526 (§ clxii)

— xv —

“My doctrine is not mine, but his that sent me.”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “My doctrine is not mine, but his that sent me.” — p. 131 (John 7:16)

— xvi —

Modern science insists upon the doctrine of evolution . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Modern science insists upon the doctrine of evolution; so do human reason and the ‘secret doctrine,’ and the idea is corroborated by the ancient legends and myths, and even by the Bible itself when it is read between the lines.  We see a flower slowly developing from a bud, and the bud from its seed.  But whence the latter, with all its predetermined programme of physical transformation, and its invisible, therefore spiritual forces which gradually develop its form, color, and odor?  The word evolution speaks for itself.  The germ of the present human race must have preëxisted in the parent of this race, as the seed, in which lies hidden the flower of the next summer, was developed in the capsule of its parent-flower; the parent may be but slightly different, but it still differs from its future progeny.” — 1:152-3
The antediluvian ancestors of the present elephant and lizard . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The antediluvian ancestors of the present elephant and lizard were, perhaps, the mammoth and the plesiosaurus; why should not the progenitors of our human race have been the ‘giants’ of the Vedas, the Völuspa, and the Book of Genesis?  While it is positively absurd to believe the ‘transformation of species’ to have taken place according to some of the more materialistic views of the evolutionists, it is but natural to think that each genus, beginning with the mollusks and ending with monkey-man, has modified from its own primordial and distinctive form.”  — 1:153

Preliminary Notes

— 1 —

“Facies totius Universi, quamvis infinitis modis variet . . .”
p/q: Spinoza, Opera, ed. C. H. Bruder, 1844: “. . . facies totius universi, quae quamvis infinitis modis variet, manet tamen semper eadem [the sum of the whole universe, which though it varies in infinite modifications, yet it always remains the same] . . .” — 2:332 (Epistola LXVI)
see: Harold Joachim, A Study of the Ethics of Spinoza, 1901: “If we proceed on this plan, through more and more complex grades of individuals in which the unity comprehends more and more . . . we shall ultimately conceive the whole extended universe as a single individual . . . it will comprehend the infinite variety of changes and processes which make up ‘the face of the corporeal universe’ {In Ep. 64, Spinoza gives . . . ‘facies totius universi, quae quamvis infinitis modis variet, manet tamen semper eadem’}.” — p. 87 & fn.

— Footnotes

“Out of the ground the Lord God formed every beast of the field . . .”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And out of the ground the Lord God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he would call them . . .”  — p. 3 (Genesis, 2:19)
“male and female” . . . “made in his (God’s) image and after his likeness”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.” — p. 2 (Genesis, 1:27)
see: John Covel, Some Account of the Present Greek Church, 1722: “I find indeed two Images of the one Invisible God exprest in Scripture; one is Man himself in general, made in his Image and after his likeness . . .” — p. 352

— 2 —

seven human beings with the faces of ravens . . . “the (Seven) great gods created”
p/q: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “Legend of Creation from Cutha tablet. . . . human beings . . . with the faces of ravens . . . these the great gods created . . .” — pp. 102-3
“In the midst of the Earth they grew up . . .”
p/q: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876:
“16. in the midst of the earth they grew up and became great,
  17. and increased in number,
  18. Seven kings brothers of the same family . . .” — p. 103
These are the Seven Kings of Edom
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “It is written: ‘And these are the Kings that reigned in the land of Edom.’ (Gen. xxxvi, 31.) . . . ‘they did not remain in their places, because the forms of the kings had not been formed as it ought to be . . .’ ” — pp. 386-7
the first race, which was imperfect . . . born before the “balance” (sexes) existed . . .
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “. . . reference is made to the seven androgenic kings who were first made, who were imperfect and were destroyed {Zohar: Siphrah D’Tznioothah . . . Idrah Zootah, 292b. La Kabbale, p. 205 sq.}. — p. 246 & fn.
      “The idea [of balance] . . . is especially noticeable in our own earth, through the difference of sex and the tendency to unification, by which the existence itself is preserved. . . . ‘Before the Balance existed . . . the primordial kings died . . .’ ” — p. 118
Seven Kings, brethren, appeared and begat children . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘Seven kings, brethren, appeared and begat children.  6000 in number were their peoples, etc.’ (Hibbert Lect., pp. 372-373.)  The god Ner or Nergal, the deity of death, was deputed to destroy these.” — p. 246
“By bringing into equilibrium (or balance) those who did not yet exist”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “This Balance hangs in the Place (Maqom) which is No-Thing (Ayin).  In the same were brought into equilibrium those who did not yet exist.” — p. 118 (Siphrah D’Tznioothah)

— Footnotes

“This is the mystery that to this day was hidden. . . .”
p/q: The Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1884: “Then said Pimander, This is the Mystery that to this day is hidden and kept secret; for Nature being mingled with man, brought forth a Wonder most Wonderful . . . seven Men, all Males and Females, and sublime, or on high, according to the Natures of the seven Governors.”   — p. 11 (ii.29)
the translator wonders “for whom these seven men are intended?” . . .
p/q: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes Trismegistus, tr. John David Chambers, 1882: “For whom these Seven Men are intended is questionable; but the difficulty may perhaps be solved thus: The original pattern Man being masculine-feminine, represents Adam with Eve . . . and the Seven whom Nature procreated may signify, in like manner, the succeeding Patriarchs named in Genesis . . .” — p. 9 fn.

— 3 —

the traditions of Esoteric Philosophy . . . [in] the Egyptian “Books of Thoth
see: Alexander Wilder, “The Eclectic Philosophy,” 1868: “Ammonius [Saccus] declared that the system of doctrine and moral life . . . was taught in the Books of Thoth, or Hermes Trismegistus, from which records Pythagoras as well as Plato derived his philosophy.  They were regarded by him as being substantially identical with the teachings of the sages of the remote East.” — p. 72 (Transactions of the Eclectic Medical Society)
the generic name of the Kabiri was the “Holy Fires”
see: Paul Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Il nous paraît plus probable que le nom des Cabires a une origine grecque . . . nous inclinons à le faire dériver de καίω, brûler.  Les Cabires seraient donc ‘ceux qui brûlent’ [It seems very probable to us that the name of the Kabiri has a Greek origin . . . we are inclined to derive it from καίω, to be on fire.  The Kabiri would thus be ‘those who are on fire’] . . .” — p. 268
the “Kabir born of the Holy Lemnos” . . .
p/q: Paul Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Pindare, dans un passage qui nous a été conservé par l’auteur des Philosophoumena, cite ‘le Cabire né de la sainte Lemnos’ parmi les personnages qui étaient considérés . . . comme les ancêtres du genre humain {Philosoph. éd. Miller, p. 96} [Pindar, in a passage that was preserved for us by the author of Philosophoumena, cites ‘the Kabir born of holy Lemnos’ among the personages who were considered . . . as ancestors of humankind] . . .” — pp. 268-9
this Kabir . . . Adamas, was, in the traditions of Lemnos . . . born from the bosom of the Earth.
p/q: Paul Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “. . . le Cabire dont parle Pindare était donc, dans les traditions de Lemnos, le type de l’homme primitif, né du sein de la terre. . . . Nous savons, en effet, qu’un des personnages des mystères de Samothrace, qui portait le nom d’Adamas, y était représenté comme l’homme archétype, comme le premier mâle dans l’ordre de la génération [the Kabir of whom Pindar speaks was thus, in the traditions of Lemnos, the type of primitive man, born from the bosom of the earth. . . . We know in fact that one of the personages of the mysteries of Samothrace, who had the name Adamas, was there represented as a human archetype, as the first male in the order of generation].” — p. 269

— Footnotes

 description of Creation . . . the Flood . . . were written “before the time of Moses”
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “This story is supposed to have happened about b.c. 1600, rather earlier than the supposed age of Moses . . . I have given the various fragments of the Legends describing the Creation, Flood, time of Nimrod . . .” — p. 300

— 4 —

Adam Kadmon is the Sephirothal tree
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “In their totality and unity the ten Sephiroth represent the archetypal man . . . Adam Qadmon . . . This is the qabalistical ‘tree of life,’ on which all things depend.” — p. 28 (Introduction)
the “Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil” . . . “hath around it seven columns” . . .
p/q: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “This is the tree which hath two paths . . . (namely, good and evil, because it is the tree of the knowledge of good and evil).  And it hath around it seven columns (that is, the seven palaces) . . .” — p. 104 (Book of Concealed Mystery, v.32)
“The word Adam used in these legends for the first human being . . .”
p/q: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “The word Adam used in these legends for the first human being is evidently not a proper name, but is only used as a term for mankind.  Adam appears as a proper name in Genesis, but certainly in some passages is only used in the same sense as the Assyrian word . . .” — p. 86

— Footnotes

Vide § “Adam-Adami,” in Part II.
see: § xvi, “Adam-Adami,” SD 2:452-8.

— 4-5 —

Samothrace . . . was overflowed very suddenly by the waters of the Euxine . . .
see: M. N. Bouillet, Dictionnaire Classique de l’Antiquité, 1841: “SAMOTHRACE . . . Diodore de Sicile (l.5.) raconte, que, long-temps avant l’expédition des Argonautes, cette île fut submergée par les eaux du Pont Euxin, qui s’ouvrirent tout à coup un passage dans la Méditerranée [Samothrace . . . Diodorus Siculus (l.5.) recounts that long before the expedition of the Argonauts, this island had been submerged by the waters of the Euxine (the Black Sea), which suddenly opened up a passage into the Mediterranean].” — 2:420

— 5 —

(the mound of Kouyunjik . . . yielded to Layard’s excavations over twenty thousand fragments . . .)
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “In the mound of Kouyunjik, opposite the town of Mosul, Mr. Layard discovered part of the Royal Assyrian library, and further collections, also forming parts of this library, have been subsequently found by Mr. H. Rassam, Mr. Loftus, and myself.  Sir Henry Rawlinson, who made the preliminary examination of Mr. Layard’s treasures, and who was the first to recognize their value, estimated the number of these fragments of inscriptions at over twenty thousand.” — p. 2
the race which was the first to fall into generation . . .
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “It appears from line 18 that the race of human beings spoken of is the zalmat-qaqadi, or dark race, and in various fragments of these legends they are called Admi or Adami, which is exactly the name given to the first man in Genesis.” — pp. 85-6
the Babylonians recognised two principal Races . . .
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “It has already been pointed out by Sir Henry Rawlinson that the Babylonians recognized two principal races: the Adamu, or dark race, and the Sarku, or light race, probably in the same manner that two races are mentioned in Genesis, the sons of Adam and the sons of God.  It appears . . . that it was the race of Adam, or the dark race, which was believed to have fallen . . .” — p. 86
these seven Gods, each . . . created a man . . .
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “The obverse gives a series of speeches and statements respecting the newly created man, who was supposed to be under the especial care of the [seven] deities. . . . The various divine titles or names, ‘the god of noble life’ . . . ‘the god of noble lips [saviour from death of the gods imprisoned],’ are all most probably titles of Hea.” — p. 85
the god Zi; the god Ziku (noble life, Director of purity); the god Mirku (noble crown) . . .
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “The god Zi . . . The god Ziku (Noble life) quickly called; Director of purity . . . The god Mir-ku (noble crown) . . . saviour from death . . . of the gods imprisoned, the accomplisher of restoration . . . May he be established, and may his will not fail . . . in the mouth of the dark races which his hand has made. . . . The god Libzu wise among the gods . . . The god Nissi . . . The god Suhhab . . . The god Hea . . .” — pp. 82-4

— Footnotes

[Samothrace overflowed] See Pliny, 4, c. 12; Strabo, 10; Herodotus, 7 c. 108; Pausanias, 7, c. 4
p/q: M. N. Bouillet, Dictionnaire Classique de l’Antiquité, 1841: “. . . cette île fut submergée par les eaux du Pont Euxin . . . Hérod., 7, c. 108. — Pline, 4, c.12. — Strab., 10 . . . Paus., 7, c. 4 [this island had been submerged by the waters of the Euxine . . . Herodotus, 7, c. 108; Pliny, 4, c. 12; Strabo, 10 . . . Pausanias, 7, c. 4].” — 2:420

— 6 —

Airyanem Vaego (see Bund. 79, 12) wherein was born the original Zoroaster
see: Zend-Avesta, Pt. 1, tr. James Darmesteter, 1880: “Now we read in the Bundahish that Zartusht founded his religion by offering a sacrifice in Irân Vêj (Airyanem Vaêjô) {Bund. 79, 12}. . . . In the Avesta itself we read that Zoroaster was born and received the law from Ormazd on a mountain, by the river Dareja . . .” — p. xlix & fn. (Vendidad, Intro. iii)

— Footnotes

we mean the “Amshaspend,” called “Zarathustra . . .”
see: C. C. J. Baron Bunsen, God in History, 1868: “. . . the Parsee conception of the seven Amshaspands . . . is brought out only by representing Ahura-mazda . . . as one of several beings, in conjunction with whom . . . he constitutes one Whole.” — 1:282-3
see: Godfrey Higgins, Anacalypsis, 1836: “Now, what is the meaning of the complicated word Zoroaster, or Zoradust [Zarathustra]? . . . we arrive at an incarnation of the Deity [Ahura-mazda] . . .” — 1:86-7
“the lord and ruler of the Vara made by Yima”
p/q: Zend-Avesta, Pt. 1, tr. James Darmesteter, 1880: “And Ahura Mazda spake unto Yima . . . ‘make thee a Vara {‘an enclosure’ . . . the Var Jam-kard, ‘the Var made by Yima’} . . .’ ” — pp. 15-16 & fn. (Vendidad, ii.22, 25)
      “O Maker of the material world, thou Holy One!  Who is the lord and ruler [of the Vara made by Yima]?
      Ahura Mazda answered: ‘. . . thyself, Zarathustra.’ ” — p. 21 (Vendidad, ii.43)

— 7 —

Apollo . . . abandoning his Hellenic sanctuaries . . .
see: Paul Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Son exil est un exil volontaire; c’est celui du dieu voyageur qui, chaque année, aime à quitter ses sanctuaires de Grèce et à prendre la route d’une lointaine et mystérieuse région où il doit séjourner, pour en revenir à une époque fixe [His exile is a voluntary exile; it is one of a traveling god, who every year loves to leave his sanctuaries in Greece and go on his way to a far and mysterious region, where he has to remain, to come back at a fixed point in time].” — p. 107
Εγγὺς γὰρ νυκτός τε καὶ ἤματός εἰσι κέλευθοι, says a verse in the Odyssey (x. 86).
p/q: Paul Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “. . . dans un vers de l’Odyssée, X, 86: ‘Ἐγγὺς γὰρ νυκτός τε καὶ ἤματός εἰσι κέλευθοι [in a verse from The Odyssey, x. 86: ‘for the ways of night and of day are close together’].” — p. 108 fn.
The land of the Hyperboreans . . . extended beyond Boreas . . .
see: Paul Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Cette région est la région hyperboréenne, celle qui s’étend au delà de Borée, le dieu de l’hiver et des ouragans, qui avait son séjour sur la chaîne des monts Riphées: région idéale, dont les anciens ont en vain cherché à déterminer la place dans le voisinage de la Scythie ou sur les bords du Danube {Voir Völcker, Myth. Geogr., 145-170} [That region is the Hyperborean region, which stretches out beyond Boreas, the god of winter and hurricanes, who had his abode on the mountain chain Riphaeus: an ideal region, which the ancients in vain tried to locate near Scythia or on the borders of the Danube].” — p. 107 & fn.
a real Continent . . . which knew no winter . . . nocturnal shadows never fall upon it
see: Paul Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Située au delà du règne de Borée, elle échappe à sa funeste action; elle ne connaît point les rigueurs de l’hiver; les ombres de la nuit ne l’enveloppent jamais [Situated beyond the kingdom of Boreas, it escapes her disastrous action; it does not know the rigours of winter; the shadows of the nights never shroud it] . . .” — p. 108
the favourite abode of Apollo . . . its inhabitants . . . his beloved priests and servants
p/q: Paul Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Ce royaume de l’éternelle lumière devait être le séjour favori du dieu radieux, d’Apollon, qui aimait à s’y transporter et à y vivre une partie de l’année . . . Les Hyperboréens étaient conçus comme les prêtres et les serviteurs chéris du dieu [That kingdom of eternal light had to be the favorite abode of the radiant god Apollo, who loved to travel there and live there a part of the year . . . The Hyperboreans were known as priests and cherished servants of the god].” — p. 108
a Continent which . . . extended from Madagascar to Ceylon and Sumatra
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Thus Mr. Sclater, on zoological grounds, claims the late existence of a continent which he calls Lemuria, extending from Madagascar to Ceylon and Sumatra . . .” — p. 47

— 7-8 —

Wallace . . . “extends the Australia of tertiary periods to New Guinea and the Solomon Islands . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “. . . for similar reasons Mr. Wallace extends the Australia of Tertiary periods to New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, and perhaps to Fiji, and from its marsupial types infers a connection with the northern continent during the Secondary period.” — p. 47

— 8 —

The famous island of Plato of that name was but a fragment of this great Continent.
see: A. P. Sinnett, Esoteric Buddhism, 1885: “The proper home of the fourth race, which directly preceded our own, was that continent of which some memory has been preserved even in exoteric literature — the lost Atlantis.  But the great island, the destruction of which is spoken of by Plato, was really but the last remnant of the continent.” — p. 64

— Footnotes [8-9]

Mr. Sclater supposes a land  . . . formerly uniting Africa, Madagascar, and India . . .
see: Alfred Russel Wallace, Geographical Distribution of Animals, 1876: “. . . a few words may be said about Lemuria, a name proposed by Mr. Sclater for the site of a supposed submerged continent extending from Madagascar to Ceylon and Sumatra, in which the Lemuroid type of animals was developed.” — 1:76
Wallace shows . . . the hypothesis of such a land is quite uncalled for . . .
see: Alfred Russel Wallace, Geographical Distribution of Animals, 1876: “But we must not . . . make this hypothetical land one of our actual Zoological regions.  It represents what was probably a primary Zoological region in some past geological epoch; but what that epoch was and what were the limits of the region in question, we are quite unable to say.” — 1:76
But he admits . . . a much closer proximity of India and Australia . . .
see: Alfred Russel Wallace, Geographical Distribution of Animals, 1876: “It is evident therefore, that during much of the tertiary period, Ceylon and South India . . . probably formed part of an extensive southern continent or great island.  The very numerous and remarkable cases of affinity with Malaya, require however some closer approximation to these islands . . .” — 1:328
“Now it is proved that . . . this region of North Africa was in fact a peninsula of Spain . . .”
p/q: Oscar Schmidt, The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “Now it is proved that, in geologically recent times, this region of North Africa was in fact a peninsula of Spain, and that its union with Africa was effected on the north by the rupture of the Straits of Gibraltar, and on the south by an upheaval to which the Sahara owes its existence.  The shores of the former Sea of Sahara are still marked by the shells of the same Gasteropoda that live on the shores of the Mediterranean.” — p. 224

— 9 —

“These secrets . . . were divulged to the men of the secret science . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myers, 1888: “These secrets were made known to the men of the secret science but not to the geographers {Zohar iii, fol. 10a}.”  — p. 139 & fn.
2,500,000 years represent the time since the beginning of the tertiary age
p/q: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “Again, if 2,500,000, according to Croll, represents the time since the beginning of the Tertiary Age, the whole incrusted age of the world would be 131,600,000 years, which I do not feel disposed to allow.” — p. 369
Mr. Croll “allows fifteen millions since the beginning of the Eocene period . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “On the other hand, Mr. Croll . . . allows fifteen millions since the beginning of the Eocene period . . .” — p. 84

— 10 —

These gentlemen . . . maintain that man existed so far back as in the Secondary Age.
see: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “I omit discussing the doubtful assertions of the extreme antiquity of man, which come to us from American observers, such as are based on supposed footprints in rocks of secondary age . . .” — p. 85

— Footnotes

Sir Charles Lyell . . . “happily invented the terms Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene” . . .
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “I have hitherto assumed a certain acquaintance, upon the part of the general reader, with the terms Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene, happily invented by Sir Charles Lyell to designate three of the four great divisions of the Tertiary age.” — p. 87
In Thomson and Tait’s “Natural Philosophy,” one finds only ten million years allowed . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “Sir William Thomson, on the basis of the observed principles of cooling, concludes that not more than ten million years can have elapsed since the temperature of the earth was sufficiently reduced to sustain vegetable life {Thomson and Tait: Natural Philosophy, Appendix D, also §§ 832 . . . (but 847-9 cancelled in Glasgow address); Trans. Roy. Soc. Edinb., xxiii, pt. I, 157, 1862}.” — p. 179 & fn.
Sir W. Thomson’s estimate as “a minimum of 98 and a maximum of 200 millions of years . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Mr. Darwin, arguing upon Sir W. Thompson’s estimate of a minimum of ninety-eight and maximum of two hundred millions of years since the consolidation of the crust, and on Mr. Croll’s estimate of sixty millions, as the time elapsed since the Cambrian period, considers that the latter is quite insufficient to permit of the many and great mutations of life which have certainly occurred since then.” — p. 83
In the same work (Nat. Phil.) 80 millions are given from the time of incipient incrustation . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “The time required for the earth to cool from incipient incrustation to its present state, based on the thermal conductivity of rock-masses and the rate of increase of heat toward the earth’s centre.  Sir William Thomson concludes that this time cannot exceed 80,000,000 years {Thomson and Tait: Nat. Phil.}” — p. 356 & fn.
basing his arguments [on] the limits to the age of the Sun’s heat . . . Croll allows 60 millions of years
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “. . . Mr. Croll [allows] . . . sixty millions of years in all since the beginning of the Cambrian period.  He bases his arguments on the limit to the age of the sun’s heat as detailed by Sir William Thompson.” — p. 84

— 11 —

the minimum time required for the formation of sedimentary strata . . .
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Thus Mr. T. Mellard Reade . . . concludes that the formation of the sedimentary strata must have occupied at least six hundred million years {“Limestone as an Index of Geological Time,” Proceedings, Royal Society, London, vol. xxviii., p. 281} . . .” — p. 82 & fn.
[Darwin] demands for the organic transformations according to his theory . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “. . . Darwin thought 300 million years demanded by the organic transformations which his theory contemplates . . .” — p. 180
Lyell and . . . Houghton . . . placing the beginning of the Cambrian Age at 200 and 240 millions
see: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Sir Charles Lyell and Professor Haughton respectively estimated the expiration of time from the commencement of the Cambrian at two hundred and forty and two hundred millions of years . . .”  — p. 84
Mr. Huxley . . . placed the beginning of the incrustation of the earth 1,000 million years ago
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “. . . Huxley is disposed to demand a thousand millions.” — p. 180
during “The Miocene Age” . . . Greenland . . . “had almost a tropical climate
see: “Physical Geology,” July 4, 1878: “There is abundant evidence to show that during the miocene tertiary period the northern parts of the continents of America and Europasia possessed a nearly common forest vegetation, with a temperate climate . . . Greenland (Disco), lat. 70° . . . Spitzbergen (West Coast), lat. 77°.”  “. . . The Island of Saghalien and the Peninsula of Kamchatka contain miocene coal beds, requiring at least a sub-tropical climate {Spitzbergen . . . in miocene times, supported a vegetation pointing to like conditions of climate} . . .” — p. 267 & fn. (Nature, v. 18)
“During the Miocene Age, Greenland (in N. Lat. 70°) developed an abundance of trees . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “. . . during the Miocene age, Greenland (in N. Lat. 70º) developed an abundance of trees, such as the yew, the Redwood, a Sequoia allied to the Californian species, beeches, planes, willows, oaks, poplars, and walnuts, as well as a Magnolia and a Zamia.” — p. 91

Part I — Anthropogenesis

— 14 —

In primeval times, a maiden . . .
p/q: The Kalevala, tr. John Martin Crawford, 1888:
“In primeval times, a maiden,
  Beauteous Daughter of the Ether,
  Passed for ages her existence
  In the great expanse of heaven . . .”
 
“Seven hundred years she wandered . . .
  Seven hundred years she labored
  Ere her first-born was delivered.”
 
“Ere a beauteous duck descending,
  Hastens toward the water-mother . . .”
 
“Lightly on the knee she settles,
  Finds a nesting-place befitting,
  Where to lay her eggs in safety.
  Here she builds her humble dwelling,
  Lays her eggs within, at pleasure,
  Six, the golden eggs she lays there,
  Then, a seventh, an egg of iron . . .” — 1:5, 6, 7, 8 (Rune I)

— 15 —

they who revolve driving their chariots around their Lord, the One Eye
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The chariots . . . of the planets: kept in their orbits by aerial chains . . .”  “I have thus described to you, Maitreya, the chariots of the . . . planets, all which are fastened to Dhruva by aerial cords. . . . {the Kūrma and Linga enumerate seven principal winds which perform this function}.” — 2:299, 305 & 306 fn. (ii.12)
see: A. A. Macdonell, Vedic Mythology, 1897: “The eye of Sūrya [the Sun] is mentioned several times . . . In the AV. he is called the ‘lord of eyes’ . . . and is said to be the one eye of created beings . . .” — p. 30

— 16 —

The water-men terrible and bad . . . created from . . . her first, second, and third . . .
see: Gerald Massey, The Hebrew and Other Creations, 1887: “These were the primitive people of the past . . . who were held to have been created without souls . . .”  “Seven such races are described in the Bundahish . . . as the earth-men, the men of the water . . . and the men with tails.” — pp. 24, 25
The flames came. . . . They dried out the turbid dark waters.
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “[Rudra] enters into the seven rays of the sun, drinks up all the waters (of the globe), and causes all moisture . . . to evaporate; thus drying up the whole earth.” — 5(I):191
the goat-men, and the dog-headed men, and the men with fishes’ bodies
see: Gerald Massey, The Hebrew and Other Creations, 1887: “These early races were first represented by Totemic zoötypes, and were afterwards abominated as the dog-men, monkey-men . . . created in the likeness of animals, reptiles, fish, or birds.” — p. 25
he separated the waters, and that was heaven above, the first heaven.
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myers, 1888: “ ‘Elohim said: Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters.’ . . . He created 7 heavens Above.  He created 7 earths Below . . .”  “And the Lower earths where do they come from?  They are from the chain of the earth and from the Heaven Above.” — pp. 415, 416
The Lords of the Flame remain behind. . . . they would not create.
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “From Brahmā . . . were born mind-engendered progeny . . . they did not multiply themselves . . . they were without desire or passion . . . estranged from the universe, and undesirous of progeny.” — 1:100-2 (i.7)

— 17 —

These three produced . . . a shadow with no sense . . .
see: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “. . . this creation of beings, without . . . the ‘Living Fire,’ produced but creatures of matter and astral light . . . the ‘witless’ seven spirits begotten by ‘Karabtanos’ and the ‘spiritus’ . . .” — 1:301

— 18 —

The Sons of Wisdom . . .
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — III,” April 1887: “In all Puranas the Maharishis are said to be the mind-born sons of Prajapati or Brahma . . . he commenced the creation of man by forming, or bringing into existence by his own intellectual power, these Maharishis and these Manus. . . . [He] is still the overshadowing Logos . . .”  “. . . the Logos is indicated in [ch. x], verse 11: ‘I, dwelling in them, out of my compassion for them, destroy the darkness born from ignorance by the shining light of spiritual Wisdom.’ ”— pp. 444, 445 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
Some entered . . . Some projected the Spark.  Some deferred . . .
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — III,” April 1887: “. . . Sanaka, Sanandana, Sanatkumara and Sanatsujata, who were also included among the mind-born sons of Prajapati. . . . It is well known that Sanaka and the other three refused to create, though the other sons had consented to do so . . .” — p. 444 (The Theosophist, v. 8)

— 19 —

the Lords of Wisdom . . . created “Sons of Will and Yoga,” by Kriyasakti
see: Stanza VII, 27: “How did they create, since the ‘Lords of Wisdom’ are identical with the Hindu Devas, who refuse ‘to create’?  Clearly they are . . . those elder sons of Brahmā, ‘Sanandana and the other sons of Vedhas’ . . . The power, by which they first created . . . was by Kriyasakti . . .” — 2:172-3
see: T. Subba Row, “The Twelve Signs of the Zodiac,” 1885: “Kriyāsakti: — The mysterious power of thought which enables it to produce external, perceptible, phenomenal results by its own inherent energy.  The ancients held that any idea will manifest itself externally if one’s attention is deeply concentrated upon it.  Similarly an intense volition will be followed by the desired result.” — p. 111 (Five Years of Theosophy)
the first animals were produced. . . . The animals separated . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “This great sage [Daksha], for the furtherance of creation . . . made movable and immovable things, bipeds and quadrupeds, and subsequently, by his will, gave birth to females . . . From that period forwards, living creatures were engendered by sexual intercourse.” — 2:10 (i.15)
The two-fold man separated also.
see: Oscar Schmidt, The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “Use and disuse . . . elucidate the separation of the sexes . . . In the Vertebrata especially, each sex possesses such distinct traces of the reproductive apparatus characteristic of the other, that even antiquity assumed hermaphroditism as a natural primæval condition of mankind.” — p. 186

— 20 —

Let us dwell in the others. . . . Then all men became endowed with Manas.
see: H. P. Blavatsky, The Key to Theosophy, 1889: “Manas is also called Kshetrajna, ‘embodied Spirit,’ because it is . . . the Manasa-putras, or ‘Sons of the Universal Mind,’ who created, or rather produced, the thinking man, ‘manu,’ by incarnating in the third Race . . .” — pp. 135-6 fn.
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — IV,” July 1887: “ ‘. . . this body is called Kshetra (Upadhi or vehicle).  That which knows this (Kshetra) the wise call Kshetragna (the real self or Ego). . . . I am the Kshetragna in all Kshetras . . .’ ” — p. 635 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
They took wives . . . from the mindless . . . They bred monsters.
see: Calmet’s Dictionary of the Holy Bible, 1830: “. . . [in] Enoch, and some passages of the LXX. . . . it is said, ‘the sons of God saw the daughters of men, and took them wives, from whom the giants descended’ . . .”  “There are three opinions remarkable in authors who have written on the fall of angels: some attribute the cause of it — (1.) to their pride and presumption: others (2.) to their envy of man: others (3.) to their irregular love of women.” — 1:433

— 21 —

The fifth . . . ruled over by the first divine Kings . . . who taught and instructed it.
see: Frederick von Schlegel, The Philosophy of History, 1835: “The Indian traditions acknowledge and revere the succession of the first ancestors of mankind, or the holy Patriarchs of the primitive world, under the name of the seven great Rishis, or sages of hoary antiquity . . .” — 1:147

— 22 —

the one eye (Loka-Chakshub) of our world
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “SŪRYA.  The sun or its deity. . . . The names and epithets of the sun are numberless.  He is Savitṛi, ‘the nourisher’ . . . Loka-chakshuh, ‘eye of the world’ . . .” — pp. 310, 311
Lha is the ancient word in trans-Himalayan regions for “Spirit” . . .
see: Ernest Eitel, Hand-book of Chinese Buddhism, 1888: “DÊVA (Singh. Dewa. Tib. Lha. . . .) . . . lit. spirits of heaven.  (1.) General designation of . . . all inhabitants of the Dêvalôkas who are subject to metempsychosis.” — p. 42
the “Seven Eyes of the Lord” in the Christian religion
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . behold a candlestick all of gold, with . . . seven lamps . . .”  “. . . these seven, which are the eyes of the Lord . . .” — pp. 1173-4 (Zechariah, 4:2, 10)
      “And I saw in the midst of the throne . . . seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God . . .” — p. 323 (Revelation, 5:6)

— 23 —

“The seven . . . create the world” . . . the fabricators . . . of Hermes
see: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes Trismegistus, tr. John D. Chambers, 1882: “But the Mind, The God . . . [begat] by Word another Mind Creator . . . [who] created some Seven Administrators {‘The Seven Spirits which are before His throne’ (Rev. i.4); ‘The Seven Spirits of God, and the Seven Stars’ (ibid. i.20; iii.1); ‘Seven lamps of fire burning before the throne, which are Seven Spirits of God’ (ibid. iv.5) . . .}, encompassing in [seven] circles the sensible world . . . Immediately from the downborne elements sprung forth The Word of The God to the pure creation of all Nature . . .” — pp. 4-5 & fn. (Poemandres, i.9-10)
“His breath gave life to the seven”
see: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes Trismegistus, tr. John D. Chambers, 1882: “By the Word of the Lord were the [seven] Heavens made, and all the host of them by the breath of His mouth (. . . καὶ τῳ πνεύματι [Spirit] . . .), Ps. xxxiii.6.” — p. 5 fn. (Poemandres, i.10)

— 24 —

This Logos is the apex of the Pythagorean triangle.
see: G. Oliver, The Pythagorean Triangle, 1875: “. . . in the celebrated Pythagorean triangle, consisting of ten points, the upper single dot or jod is monad or unity . . .” — p. 18
      “From this eternal Monad, however, from this primeval Unity . . . there sprang an infinite duality.” — p. 48
      “ ‘God . . . fills up the whole circle of the universe, but makes His particular abode in the centre . . .’ ” — p. 51
      “. . . the centre was . . . the Verbum fiat, the natural Word of God . . .” — p. 59
it becomes the Tetraktis . . . the four-lettered Tetragrammaton in the manifested Kosmos
see: G. Oliver, The Pythagorean Triangle, 1875: “. . . the tetrad or tetractys was called Kosmos, the world . . . the sensible world, which is properly what Pythagoras meant by the word Kosmos, is Fire, Air, Water, and Earth.” — pp. 111-12
hence spring the wondrous laws of matter: hence the “primal impress”
see: Frederick Temple, The Relations Between Religion and Science, 1885: “[God] did not make the things, we may say; no, but He made them make themselves. . . . thus to impress His Will once for all on His creation, and provide for all its countless variety by this one original impress . . . creating the original elements of matter, determining their number and their properties . . . creating the various laws of chemical and physical action . . .” — pp. 115-16

— 25 —

minus Force, Mulaprakriti is . . . non-existent
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — I,” Feb. 1887: “Now we see the first manifestation of Parabrahmam is a Trinity . . . It consists of Mulaprakriti [Root-Nature], Eswara or the Logos, and the conscious energy of the Logos, which is its power and light . . .”  “This light . . . is the life of the whole of nature.” — p. 305
      “The universe . . . does not . . . spring into existence merely on account of the potentialities locked up in Mulaprakriti.  It comes into existence mainly through the instrumentality of the one source of energy and power existing in the cosmos, which we have named the Logos . . . Matter acquires all its attributes . . . by the action of this light that emanates from the Logos upon Mulaprakriti.” — p. 306 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
The “Heavenly Man” . . . Tikkoun, the firstborn . . . the universal form and idea
see: C. W. King, The Gnostics and Their Remains, 1887: “. . . the First-born of God, the Tikkun, or ‘Universal Type’ (Platonic Idea) . . . is the creator, preserver, and prime animator of the world.  He is the ‘Light of light,’ possessing the three primitive forces of the Godhead: the light, the spirit, and the life.” — p. 34
the manifested Logos, Adam Kadmon . . . of the Universe itself . . . the second Logos
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “Especially was this idea in the Primordial Adam, the content of the invisible and visible universe . . . the Logos of St. John which created all Things . . .”  “[Philo] teaches, as does the Qabbalah, that . . . the Deity created perfect spiritual types . . . these were also thought of as active causes which brought disorganized matter into order.  Through these spiritual powers the Deity was asserted to act in the universe.  They were his ministers, the logoi . . .” — p. 301
Dianoia and Logos are synonymous, Nous being superior . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “Philological Notes,” March 1887: “. . . I read διάνοιᾶ and λόγος as synonymous: νοῦς being superior, and closely in affinity with το αγαθον.  Thus νοῦς and ἐπιστήμη belong together, διάνοιᾶ and λόγος: one being the superior apprehending, the other the comprehending — one noetic, and the other phrenic.” — p. 131 (The Platonist, v. 3)
Man was regarded in several systems as the third Logos. . . .
see: S. F. Dunlap, Sōd, The Son of the Man, 1861: “. . . the Christians and Gnostics agreed on one point; namely, that the Anointed is the ‘WISDOM,’ the LOGOS. . . . The doctrine that the ‘WISDOM’ is the Demiurg [creative Logos] . . . belongs to the Gnosis (the old ‘Oriental Philosophy’) . . .”  “The Heavenly MAN is the Divine THOUGHT, which is usually named the LOGOS, or the Word.” — pp. 64-5, 66
It is the three Heads of the Kabala: “Unum intra alterum, et alterum super alterum
p/q: S. F. Dunlap, Sōd, The Son of the Man, 1861: “ ‘Three heads are hewn in one another and over one another. . . . Tria capita exsculpta sunt, unum intra alterum, et alterum supra alterum.’ ” — pp. 78-9 (Idra Suta, Sohar, III. 288, b)
“Every Universe (world or planet) has its own Logos”
see: Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church (II), 1884: “Each world has a beginning and an end . . . Origen mediates the transition from God to the world by the eternal generation of the Logos . . .” — p. 541
The Sun was always called by the Egyptians “the eye of Osiris”
see: Enoch: The Second Messenger of God, [by E. V. H. Kenealy, 1872]: “One of the symbols of Osiris, or God in his solar aspect, was an Eye.  Sallust, the philosopher, called the Sun the Eye of Heaven . . .” — 2:89
light made manifest . . . “which is the Mind and divine intellect of the Concealed”
see: Dictionary of Christian Biography, ed. Smith & Wace, 1877: “The Supreme Being or the En Soph . . . cannot be comprehended by the intellect . . . Nor can He be the direct creator . . . [En Soph] sent forth from the fulness of his infinite light one spiritual substance or [divine] intelligence. . . . when the Concealed of the Concealed wished to reveal himself, he first made a single point.  The Infinite was entirely unknown, and diffused no light, before this luminous point violently broke through into vision.” — 1:357
It is symbolised generally by the Dragon and the Serpent
see: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes Trismegistus, tr. John David Chambers, 1882: “. . . darkness was brought down in part having become dreadful and horrible, sinuously terminated . . . the darkness changed into a certain moist nature . . . giving forth smoke as if from fire . . .” — p. 2 (Poemandres, i.4)
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘. . . under the form of a long serpent, extended hither and thither, the tail (of the serpent) is in its head . . . It watches and hides itself.  Once, in a thousand . . . (? years or periods of time); it is manifested.’ ” — p. 233
see: Gerald Massey, Natural Genesis, 1883: “The Sesha-Naga of India . . . As Ananta it typifies the Vague Infinite. . . . The Serpent with Seven heads forms the support of Vishnu in the Abyss of the Waters when he dreams or muses in the Intervals of Creation . . .” — 1:350

— Footnotes

see the Notes thereon published in the “Theosophist” . . .
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita,” Lectures I-IV: February, March, April & July, 1887, The Theosophist, v. 8.

— 26 —

In the epic poem of Finland, the Kalewala . . .
see: The Kalevala: The Epic Poem of Finland, tr. John Martin Crawford, 2 vols., New York: J. B. Alden, 1888.
the Serpent of Evil . . . is born from the “spittle of Suoyatar . . .”
see: The Kalevala, tr. John Martin Crawford, 1888: “Hiisi, the Finnish devil . . . was brought into the world consentaneously with Suoyatar, from whose spittle, as sung in The Kalevala, he formed the serpent.” — 1:xxii (Preface)
“. . . endowed with a living Soul by the Principle of Evil,” Hisi
see: The Kalevala, tr. John Martin Crawford, 1888:
“Hisi . . . Made himself to be creator,
  Breathed a soul into the spittle . . .
  Thus was born the evil serpent,
  This the origin of evil.” — 2:436
A strife is described between the two, the “thing of Evil” . . . and Ahti . . . Magic Lemminkainen
see: The Kalevala, tr. John Martin Crawford, 1888:
“ ‘Whither art thou driving, Ahti {Lemminkainen} . . .’
  ‘To the feastings of Pohyola . . .’ ”
 
“In the way, a serpent lying . . .
  Hundred-eyed, the heinous serpent,
  And a thousand tongues . . .
  ‘Close thy mouth, thou thing of evil . . .’
  Hardly had the hero ended,
  When the monster . . .
  Pounces with his mouth of venom
  At the head of Lemminkainen . . .” — 2:428, 432-4 (Rune 26) & 739 note (Glossary)
Ilmatar, the virgin “daughter of the air,” she “who fell from heaven into the sea”
p/q: The Kalevala, tr. John Martin Crawford, 1888: “The Finns proper regard the chief heroes . . . as descendants of the Celestial Virgin, Ilmatar . . .” — 1:xxxii (Preface)
      “Ilmatär.  Daughter of the Air, and mother of Wainamoinen.”  “Waīnamoinen. . . . The chief hero of the Kalevala . . . whose mother, Ilmatar, fell from the air into the ocean.” — 2:739, 744
“Hews the wall with might of magic . . .”
p/q: The Kalevala, tr. John Martin Crawford, 1888:
“Hews the wall with might of magic,
  Breaks the palisade in pieces,
  Hews to atoms seven pickets,
  Chops the serpent-wall to fragments . . .”
 
“When the monster, little heeding,
  Hissing with his tongue in anger,
  Plying like the forked lightning,
  Pounces with his mouth of venom
  At the head of Lemminkainen;
  But the hero, quick recalling,
  Speaks the master-words of knowledge,
  Words that came from distant ages,
  Words his ancestors had taught him . . .” — pp. 432, 434 (Rune 26)
In China the men of Fohi (or the “Heavenly Man”) . . .
see: Universal History, v. 20, 1748: “. . . the vast ocean of eternity that preceded the creation of the world. . . . the water, or liquid mass . . . resembles the chaos of Ovid . . . The Tien hoam xi, Ty hoam xi, and Gin hoam xi, i.e. The august family of heaven, the august family of earth, and the august family of men . . . that immediately come after the liquid mass . . . denote the creation of the heavens, of the earth, and of man. . . . the august family of men . . . [are] antediluvian generations preceding Noah . . . Fo-hi . . . is placed at the head of those generations . . . which seems to imply that Adam and Fo hi were the same person.” — pp. 153-4
the twelve Tien Hoang . . . with human Faces and Dragon bodies
see: Augustus Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries among the Mayas and the Quiches, 1886: “Of these rulers we again find . . . the twelve children of the emperor of Heaven, Tien-Hoang, who had the body of a serpent.” — p. 96

— Footnotes [26-7]

“The Serpent has been connected with the god of wisdom . . .”
p/q: Charles Staniland Wake, The Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “The serpent has been connected with the god of Wisdom from the earliest times of which we have any historical notice.  This animal was the especial symbol of Thoth or Taut, a primeval deity of Syro-Egyptian mythology, and of all those gods, such as Hermes and Seth, who can be connected with him.  This is true also of the third member of the primitive Chaldean triad, Héa or Hoa.” — p. 73
the most important titles of this deity refer to “his functions as the source of all knowledge . . .”
p/q: Charles Staniland Wake, The Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “According to Sir Henry Rawlinson, the most important titles of this deity refer to ‘his functions as the source of all knowledge and science.’  Not only is he ‘the intelligent fish,’ but his name may be read as signifying both ‘life’ and a ‘serpent,’ and he may be considered as ‘figured by the great serpent which occupies so conspicuous a place among the symbols of the gods on the black stones recording Babylonian benefactions.’ ” — p. 73
Esculapius, Serapis, Pluto, Knoum and Kneph, are all deities with the attributes of the serpent.
p/q: Charles Staniland Wake, The Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “[The serpent] was also the symbol of other gods of health and the like attributes, as stated by the learned Dupuis in the chapters entitled ‘Esculapius, Serapis, Pluto, Esmun, Cneph, and all the divinities with the attributes of the serpent.’ ”  — p. 75
The crown formed of an asp, the Thermuthis, belongs to Isis, goddess of Life and Healing.
p/q: Charles Staniland Wake, The Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “That the idea of health was among the Egyptians intimately associated with the serpent, is shown, moreover, by the crown formed of the asp, of sacred Thermuthis, having been given particularly to Isis, a goddess of Life and Healing.” — p. 75
The Upanishads have a treatise on the Science of Serpents . . .
p/q: Charles Staniland Wake, The Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “The Upanishads refer to the science of serpents, by which is meant the wisdom of the mysterious Nagas who, according to Buddhistic legend, reside under Mount Meru, and in the waters of the terrestrial world.  One of the sacred books of the Tibetan Buddhists is fabled to have been received from the Nagas, who, says Schlagentweit, are ‘fabulous creatures, of the nature of serpents, who occupy a place among the beings superior to man, and are regarded as protectors of the law of the Buddha.’ ” — p. 72
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “. . . the Nagas, fabulous creatures of the nature of serpents, who occupy a place among the beings superior to man, and are regarded as protectors of the law of the Buddha.” — p. 31

— 27 —

figures of clay . . . (compare the “Symbols of the Bonzes”)
see: Nicolas Longobardi, Traité sur la Religion des Chinois, 1701: “Les symboles sont aussi en usage dans les Sectes des Bonzes . . . Ces symboles sont des figures humaines . . . Les Taoçu, à l’imitation des Bonzes, se servent presque des mêmes figures humaines, pour signifier . . . les Elémens dont l’homme est compose [The symbols are also used in the sects of the Bonzes . . . These symbols are human figures . . . The Tao-tzu, in imitation of the Bonzes, use almost the same human figures, to signify . . . the Elements of which man is made] . . .” — p. 103 (Leibnitii Opera Omnia, v. 4)
men were created by the “Sons of God” descending on Earth
see: Charles Churchill, Mount Lebanon, 1853: “. . . the Druses utterly reject the idea of the descent of mankind from a single pair.  Contemporary and simultaneously with the first manifestation amongst men of the ‘Universal Intelligence,’ the human form in which the Deity ‘was clothed upon’ was called  ‘Albar.’ . . . ‘Those who believed in Albar . . . were called Binni Ullah, or the sons of God.’ ”  “. . . the divine and glorious Humanity of the Lord is anterior to all created substances, and is the prototype of the human form . . .” — 2:46, 68

— Footnotes

Gautama Buddha “is said to have taught them . . .”
p/q: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “. . . Nāgārjuna received the book Paramārtha . . . from the Nāgas . . . To these spiritual beings Sākyamuni is said to have taught a more philosophical religious system than to men, who were not sufficiently advanced to understand it at the time of his appearance.” — p. 31
The Mandragora is the mandrake of the Bible . . .
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And Reuben went in the days of wheat harvest, and found mandrakes in the field, and brought them unto his mother Leah.  Then Rachel said to Leah, Give me, I pray thee, of thy son’s mandrakes.” — p.  38 (Genesis, 30:14)
“Like mandrakes torn out of the earth . . .”
p/q: William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet:
“As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
              . . . where, as they say,
  At some hours in the night spirits resort;
              . . . with loathsome smells;
  And shrieks like mandrakes, torn out of the earth,
  That living mortals, hearing them, run mad . . .” — IV.iii, 39, 43-4, 46-8

— 27-8 —

“. . . Mercury receives seven times more light and heat from the Sun . . .”
see: G. Fellows Harrison, “New Theories of Light and Heat,” Oct. 6, 1855: “. . . the planets in the solar system derive light and heat from the sun according to the square of the distance they are from him: thus they say Mercury receives about seven times more light and heat than our earth, Venus about twice as much . . .” — p. 325 (Mechanics’ Magazine, v. 63)

— 28 —

Mithra, the genius . . . established between the Sun and the Moon . . .”
p/q: J- E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “ ‘. . . Mithra n’est ni un dieu, ni le soleil, mais un génie établi entre le soleil et la lune, compagnon perpétuel du soleil tout . . . en différant essentiellement’ [Mithra is neither a god nor the sun, but a genius established between the sun and the moon, constant companion of the sun while differing essentially from it].” — 4:161
Pausanias shows him as having an altar in common with Jupiter . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Pausanias, livre V, nous dit qu’il avait un autel commun avec Jupiter.  On l’appelait Fils de Jupiter et Apollon; on lui donnait des ailes, pour exprimer la course du soleil, on l’appelait encore Nuntium ou Soleil-loup, ‘solaris luminis particeps, participant à la lumière solaire’ [Pausanias, Book V, tells us he had an altar in common with Jupiter.  He was called the Son of Jupiter and Apollo; he was given wings to express the path of the sun, he was also called Nuntium or Sun-wolf, ‘solaris luminis particeps,’ participating in the sunlight].” — 4:161
Virgil depicts him as taking “his wand to evoke from Orcus the souls plunged therein”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Virgile le peint ainsi: ‘Tum virgam capit, hac animas ille vocat Orco; il prend sa verge qui lui sert à l’évocation des âmes plongées dans le Tartare’ [Virgil describes him as follows: ‘Tum virgam capit, hac animas ille vocat Orco; he takes his wand which he uses to evoke the souls plunged into Tartarus’].” — 4:161
see: Virgil, Works, 1872:
“Tum virgam capit (hac animas ille evocat Orco
  Pallentis, alias sub Tartara tristia mittit . . .)
  [Then he takes his wand (with this he summons the pale departed souls
  from Orcus and sends others down to gloomy Tartarus . . .)].” — 2:284
(See also the 21st Fargard of the Vendidad on the celestial militia.)
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Mais ce n’était pas leur seul emprunt sidéral, car le 21e fargard des Vendidad donne un chant à refrain sur toute la milice céleste [But it was not their only sidereal derivation, because the 21st fargard of the Vendidad gives a verse with a refrain about the entire celestial militia].” — 4:161 fn.
He is the golden-coloured Mercury, the χρυσοφαὴς Ἐρμῆς . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “C’est le χρυσοφαὴς Ἐρμῆς, le Mercure couleur d’or, que les prêtres défendaient de nommer.  C’est l’un des deux chiens qui gardent le troupeau, autrement dit l’Hermès-Anubis ou Agathodæmon.  C’est l’Argus qui veille sur la terre et que la terre prend pour le soleil.  C’est un des deux assesseurs du soleil.  C’est par lui que l’empereur apostat se recommande toutes les nuits au Soleil [This is the χρυσοφαὴς Ἐρμῆς, the golden-colored Mercury, which the priests forbade to name.  This is one of two dogs that guard the flock, in other words Hermes-Anubis or Agathodæmon.  This is the Argus who watches over the earth and which the earth takes to be the sun.  This is one of two assistants of the Sun.  It was through him that the apostate emperor prays to the Sun every night].” — 4:162
“All the theologians agree to say that Mercury and the Sun are one. . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . ‘car, dit le savant Vossius, tous les théologiens affirment que Mercure et le Soleil ne sont qu’un . . . C’était le plus éloquent et le plus sage des dieux, ce qui n’était pas étonnant, étant si voisin de la sagesse et du Verbe de Dieu, qu’il se confondait avec eux {Idolâtrie, 1. II, p. 373} [because, says the learned Vossius, all the theologians maintain that Mercury and the Sun are but one . . . He was the most eloquent and the wisest of the gods, which was not surprising, because, being so close to the wisdom and to the Word of God, he was confused with them].” — 4:162 & fn.
The Hermes-Sarameyas of the Greeks is closely related to the Hindu Saram and Sarameya . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Il est évident que l’Hermès Sarameyas des Grecs remonte à ce divin lévrier Sarama des Indiens, ‘qui garde pour le maître des cieux le troupeau d’or des étoiles et des rayons solaires’ [It is obvious that the Hermes Sarameyas of the Greeks traces its origin back to this divine dog Saramā of the Hindus, ‘who guards the golden flock of stars and solar rays for the master of the heavens’].” — 4:162

— Footnotes

“In the book of Hammannunah . . . the earth turns upon itself in the form of a circle . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “. . . many centuries before Copernicus wrote his work on the ‘Revolution of the Heavenly Bodies,’ which was about 1542 A.D., the Zohar stated . . . that: ‘In the book of Hammannunah, the Old (or, the Ancient), we learn through some extended explanations, that the earth turns upon itself in the form of a circle; that some are on top, the others below; that all creatures change in aspect, following the manner of each place, keeping however in the same position, but there are some countries of the earth which are lightened, whilst others are in darkness; these have the day when for the former it is night; and there are countries in which it is constantly day, or in which at least the night continues only some instants {Zohar iii, fol. 10a}.” — p. 139 & fn.

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each of the seven First-born (the primordial human groups)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “In the beginning of the Kalpa, as Brahmā purposed to create a son . . . [a youth] appeared; crying with a low cry . . . ‘Rudra be thy name . . . be composed; desist from tears.’  But, thus addressed, the boy still wept seven times; and Brahmā therefore gave to him seven other denominations: and to these eight persons regions . . . and posterity belong.” — 1:115-16
Lohitanga (the “fiery-bodied,” Venus, or Sukra)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “He also assigned to them their respective stations, the sun, water, earth, air, fire, ether . . . and the moon . . . Now hear an account of their progeny, by whose successive generations this world has been peopled. . . . Śanaiśchara (Saturn), Śukra (Venus), the fiery-bodied {Lohitānga} (Mars) . . . and Budha (Mercury).” — 1:116-17
The first is born under the Sun
see: Original Sanskrit Texts, tr. J. Muir, 1868-73: “ ‘To Mārtaṇḍa (i.e. Vivasvat, the Sun) was born the wise and mighty Manu . . . on whom a race was founded.’ ” — 1:126 (Mahābhārata, Ādi Parvan, 3128)
Brihaspati (Jupiter)
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ANGIRAS . . . He was one of the seven Maharshis or great Ṛishis, and also one of the ten Prajāpatis or progenitors of mankind. . . . As an astronomical personification he is Bṛihaspati, the regent of the planet Jupiter, or the planet itself.” — p. 16
Sani, Saturn, the Krura-lochana (evil-eyed) and the Asita (the dark)
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ŚANI.  The Planet Saturn. . . . he is called Krūra-dṛis and Krūra-lochana, ‘the evil-eyed one.’  He is also . . . Asita, ‘the dark.’ ” — p. 278

— Footnotes

“As it is above so it is below” is the fundamental axiom of occult philosophy.
see: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Smaragdine Tablet of Hermes. — The foundation of Hermetic knowledge, according to the occult system of viewing the phenomena of life . . . ‘That which is above is as that which is below, and that which is below is as that which is above . . .’ ” — p. 677
As the logos is seven-fold . . . it appears as seven logoi under seven different forms
see: T. Subba Row, “The Constitution of the Microcosm,” Aug. 1887: “. . . the Logos has seven forms.  In other words there are seven kinds of Logoi in the cosmos.” — p. 706 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
“each of these is the central figure of one of the seven main branches . . .”
p/q: T. Subba Row, “The Constitution of the Microcosm,” Aug. 1887: “Each of these has become the central figure of one of the seven main branches of the ancient Wisdom-religion.” — p. 706 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
the seven principles which correspond to the seven distinct states of Pragna, or consciousness . . .
p/q: T. Subba Row, “The Constitution of the Microcosm,” Aug. 1887: “It has seven distinct principles, which correspond with seven distinct states of Pragna or consciousness. . . . The seven principles are allied to seven states of matter, and to seven forms or force.” — p. 706 (The Theosophist, v. 8)

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Venus . . . as a Globe poised over a Cross, and the Earth, as a Globe under a Cross
p/q: J- E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . on voit cette planète figurée dans les plus anciennes tables astronomiques par une croix sous un globe, pendant que la terre, sa sœur, l’est au contraire par une croix sur un globe [we see this planet represented in the most ancient astronomical tables as a cross under a globe, while the earth, its sister, on the contrary, is represented as a cross over a globe].” — 4:164
Venus or Sukra . . . is the son of Bhrigu, one of the Prajapati . . . and is Daitya-Guru . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ŚUKRA. The planet Venus and its regent.  Śukra was son of Bhṛigu and priest of Bali and the Daityas (Daitya-guru).” — p. 307
      “BHṚIGU. A Vedic sage.  He is one of the Prajāpatis and great Ṛishis . . .”  “DAITYAS. . . . They are a race of demons and giants, who warred against the gods . . .” — pp. 54, 76
the symbol is transformed . . . (See first pp. of Book I) . . .
see: Proem: “When the diameter line is crossed by a vertical one . . . it becomes the mundane cross.  Humanity has reached its third root-race; it is the sign for the origin of human life to begin.  When the circumference disappears and leaves only Cross it is a sign that the fall of man into matter is accomplished, and the fourth race begins.” — SD 1:5
The Egyptians symbolized Ank, “life,” by the ansated cross . . . another form of Venus
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “The Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “With the Egyptians this symbol was given as ankh1 . . . and by them called ank (I. being, life) . . . As ankh2 the same was the sign of the goddess Venus.” — p. 262 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— Footnotes

the bearded Venus
see: John P. Lundy, Monumental Christianity, 1876: “The two figures above shown . . . were found at or near old Paphos.  One is the bearded Venus . . . as Sir William Jones remarks, ‘Venus, presiding over generation, and, on that account, exhibited sometimes of both sexes . . . as in her bearded statue at Rome . . .’ ” — p. 324

— 31 —

The word Ank in Hebrew, with the personal suffix . . . “is the personal pronoun Anochi” . . .
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “The Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . ank (I. being, life) being the same word with the Hebrew anochi (the personal pronoun I).” — p. 262 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
the hermaphrodite goddess Adanari . . .
see: Edward Moor, The Hindu Pantheon, 1810: “. . . the Mighty Power, having divided his own substance, became male and female; and from that female produced Viraj. . . . from which it is likely that the Hindu sculptors and painters have derived their idea of the half male, half female, figure, seen in the cave on Gharipuri (Elephanta) . . . represented in plates 7. and 24. called Ardha Nari.” — p. 83
Vishnu . . . represented with a lotus growing out of his navel . . .
see: Edward Moor, The Hindu Pantheon, 1810: “The portion of plate 7. . . . represents . . . Narayana, or Vishnu, reposing on the vast thousand-headed serpent, Sesha, contemplating and willing the creation of the world: the creative power Brahma, is seen springing from his navel on a lotos . . .” — p. 26
shown . . . as double-sexed (Vishnu and Lakshmi)
see: Edward Moor, The Hindu Pantheon, 1810: “Lacshmi is seated [with Vishnu] . . . On the top of the picture are written in Sanscrit these words — Shesheshahi, Narayana, Lacshmi, sahit; meaning Narayana with Lacshmi, on Sesha.” — p. 27
Pythagoras calls Sukra-Venus the Sol alter, “the other Sun.”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . Vénus, que Pythagore appelait sol alter, ou l’autre soleil [Venus, which Pythagoras called sol alter, or the other Sun] . . .” — 4:164
see: Pliny, Natural History, tr. Bostock & Riley, 1855: “. . . Venus . . . when it precedes the day and rises in the morning, it receives the name of Lucifer, as if it were another sun [sol alter] . . . Pythagoras, the Samian, was the first who discovered its nature . . .” — 1:29 (ii.6)
Of the “seven palaces of the Sun,” that of Lucifer Venus is the third . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Il ne faut pas oublier en outre que le Zohar assigne toujours Sammaël le troisième palais . . . parmi les sept palais principaux du soleil.  Vénus, en effet, occupe le troisième rang, en partant du soleil [Moreover, we must not forget that the Zohar always assigns the third palace, of the seven main palaces of the Sun, to Samael.  Venus, in fact, occupies the third rank, starting from the Sun].” — 4:165
Sukra’s car . . . is said to be drawn by an ogdoad of “earth-born horses” . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The chariot of the son of Chandra (Budha or Mercury) . . . is drawn by eight bay horses, of the speed of the wind.  The vast car of Śukra (Venus) is drawn by earth-born horses . . . The splendid car of Bhauma (Mars) is . . . drawn by eight horses, of a ruby red, sprung from fire.  Bṛihaspati (Jupiter), in a golden car drawn by eight pale-coloured horses . . .” — 2:304 (ii.12)
Venus . . . is now placed by theologians between the horns of the mystic Lucifer.
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Une très-remarquable coïncidence est encore celle qui existe, dans la configuration de Vénus, entre les cornes du Lucifer Mystique dont ‘une est abattue’ . . . et cette bizarrerie zoologique qui donne au croissant de cette planète ‘l’apparence d’une corne tronquée’ [One very remarkable coincidence is again the one that exists, in the configuration of Venus between the horns of the mystic Lucifer, of which ‘one is downcast’ . . . and that bizarre zoological quality that gives to the crescent of that planet ‘the appearance of a truncated horn’] . . .” — 4:164

— Footnotes

The ansated Cross . . . Venus, “signifying . . . Isis . . . Eve, Hauvah . . .”
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “The Cabbalah — IX,” Masonic Review, May 1887: “. . . the number 10, ‌‌‌the chosen symbolical picture of male-female, which is the letter jod and Hauva, or Eva.  The picture of the number 10 also indicates . . . Venus, or Isis, — all carrying the same idea of the Mysteries of Creation.” — p. 198
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “The Cabbalah — XI,” Masonic Review, Oct. 1887: “. . . 10 . . . the picture of the circle with its diameter line, the parts of the ansated cross, the generative source . . .” — p. 138
Athenaeus shows that the first letter of Satan’s name was . . . an arc and crescent . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . si nous en croyons Athénée, ‘la première lettre du nom de Satan se traçait autrefois comme un arc et comme un croissant’ et serait-ce en honneur de cette planète, qu’ils continuent à adorer, que les enfants du Croissant auraient fait de celui-ci la base de leur blason [if we believe Athenaeus about this, the first letter of Satan’s name was in bygone days outlined by an arc and a crescent . . . and would it be in honor of that planet that they continue to worship, that the children of the Crescent would have made of it the basis of their coat of arms]?” — 4:164

— 32 —

Venus changes . . . with the Earth . . . many and great were their common changes
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . s’il faut en croire le témoignage de l’antiquité, Vénus aurait subi . . . des modifications tellement extraordinaires, qu’elles ne pourraient résulter que de la transformation complète de sa nature [if we have to believe the testimony of antiquity, Venus would have undergone . . . such extraordinary modifications that they could only have resulted in the complete transformation of its nature] . . .” — 4:165
to connect the last changes of the planet with the Noachian and mythical Deluge . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . saint Augustin . . . (Cité de Dieu, 1. XXI, ch. viii) rapporte . . . que ‘cette étoile aurait changé de couleur, de grandeur, de figure et de cours.’  Cet événement . . . serait arrivé l’an 1796 avant l’ère chrétienne, c’est-à-dire à peu près à l’époque du déluge, qui inclinait la terre sur son axe [St. Augustine . . . (City of God) reports . . . that ‘this heavenly body would have changed color, size, shape and course.’  This event . . . would have taken place in the year 1796 before the Christian era, that is, almost in the time of the Deluge, which made the Earth lean on its axis].” — 4:165
Sukra went to Siva asking him to protect . . . the Daityas and Asuras, from the fighting gods
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The Hari-vanśa relates that he [Śukra] went to Śiva and asked for means of protecting the Asuras against the gods . . .” — p. 307
to further his object he performed a Yoga rite “imbibing the smoke of chaff . . . for 1,000 years”
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “. . . for obtaining his object he performed ‘a painful rite, imbibing the smoke of chaff with his head downwards for a thousand years.’ ” — p. 307

— Footnotes

the association between the serpent and the idea of darkness had an astronomical foundation. . . .
p/q: C. Staniland Wake, The Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “The association between the serpent and the idea of darkness had an astronomical foundation.  The position which the constellation Draco at one time occupied showed that the Great Serpent was the ruler of the night.  This constellation was formerly at the very centre of the heavens, and it is so extensive, that it was called the Great Dragon.  Its body spreads over seven signs of the Zodiac . . .” — p. 79
Dupuis . . . “sees in the Dragon . . . a reference to the celestial serpent” . . .
p/q: C. Staniland Wake, The Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “. . . Dupuis, who sees in the Dragon of the Apocalypse a reference to the celestial serpent, says, ‘It is not astonishing that a constellation so extended should be represented by the author of that book as a great dragon with seven heads, who drew the third part of the stars from heaven and cast them to the earth’ {Dupuis, Tom. iii. p. 255}.” — p. 79 & fn.
Seth . . . was . . . “a great god universally adored in Egypt . . .”
p/q: C. Staniland Wake, The Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “ ‘Seth was at one time,’ says Bunsen, ‘a great god, universally adored throughout Egypt, who conferred on the sovereigns of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Dynasties the symbols of life and power.  The most glorious monarch of the latter dynasty Sethos, derives his name from this deity.  But, subsequently, in the course of the Twentieth Dynasty, he is suddenly treated as an evil demon, inasmuch that his effigies and name are obliterated on all the monuments and inscriptions that could be reached.’ ” — p. 60
Sukra is the son of Bhrigu
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ŚUKRA.  The planet Venus and its regent.  Śukra was son of Bhṛigu . . . Śukra is known by his patronymic Bhārgava . . .” — p. 307
Bhrigu the great Rishi . . . founder of the Race of Bhargavas . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “BHṚIGU. . . . one of the Prajāpatis and great Ṛishis . . . the founder of the race of the Bhṛigus or Bhārgavas, in which was born . . . Paraśu Rāma.” — p. 54

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for killing Sukra’s mother, Vishnu was cursed . . . to be reborn seven times on the Earth
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In his [Śukra’s] absence . . . Vishṇu killed his mother, for which deed Śukra cursed him ‘to be born seven times in the world of men.’ ” — p. 307
All have a double physical and spiritual nature.”
see: Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1884: “For Generation and Time, in Heaven and in Earth, are of a double Nature; in Heaven they are unchangeable and incorruptible; but on Earth they are changeable and corruptible.” — p. 62 (x.34)
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘All that which is found (or exists) upon the Earth, has its spiritual counterpart also to be found on High, and there does not exist the smallest thing in this world, which is not itself attached to something on High, and is not found in dependence upon it.’ ” — p. 109
Pratyagâtma (. . . the Logos . . . appearing at the beginning of every new Manvantara)”
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — I,” Feb. 1887: “This Logos may be called . . . Pratyagatma or Sabda Brahmam. . . . a centre of spiritual energy which is unborn and eternal, and which exists in a latent condition in the bosom of Parabrahmam at the time of pralaya, and starts as a centre of conscious energy at the time of cosmic activity.” — p. 303 (The Theosophist, v. 8)

— Footnotes

in “the first Earth of the astral world,” inhabitants dressed as the peasants in Europe . . .
p/q: Camille Flammarion, Pluralité des Mondes Habitées, 1869: “Sur une première Terre dans le monde astral. ‘. . . Je vis ensuite quelques habitants qui étaient d’une basse condition, vêtus à peu près comme les paysans en Europe. . . . Sur une quatrième terre du monde astral, il y a des hommes vêtus et des hommes non vêtus.’ ”  “ ‘Ensuite il se présenta à lui, sur la droite, plusieurs autres femmes qui faisaient paître des brebis et des agneaux’ [On the first Earth in the astral world. ‘. . . Then I saw some inhabitants who were of a low station, dressed almost like the peasants in Europe . . . On the fourth earth of the astral world, there are people with clothes on and people without clothes.’  ‘After that, several women appeared to him on the right, who looked after sheep and lambs’].” — pp. 237-8
see: Emanuel Swedenborg, The Earths in the Universe, and Their Inhabitants, 1875: “Afterwards I saw some of the inhabitants, who were of the meaner class, clothed nearly like the country-people in Europe.”  “Whilst the spirit who had been a prelate and preacher was with those who were clothed, there appeared a woman of a very beautiful countenance, in a plain simple dress . . . Afterwards there appeared to him on the right several other women, who had the care of sheep and lambs . . .” — pp. 91, 110 (§§ 134, 162)
the mistaken idea that other worlds and planets have the same identical beings . . .
see: Camille Flammarion, Pluralité des Mondes Habitées, 1869: “. . . l’astronome Huygens . . . s’est laissé lui-même égarer . . . en croyant voir sur les autres mondes des créations identiques à celles qui existent dans celui-ci [the astronomer Huygens . . . has deluded himself . . . into believing that he saw on the other worlds creations identical to those that exist on this one].” — p. 239
possessing the same figures, senses, brain-power, arts, sciences, dwellings . . .
see: Camille Flammarion, Pluralité des Mondes Habitées, 1869: “. . . ils ont la même desposition de corps . . . des vêtements leur sont semblablement nécessaires; le commerce, la guerre, les besoins divers et les passions de l’homme se trouvent là comme ici; les habitants des planètes se bâtissent des demeures par une architecture analogue à la nôtre, ils connaissent la marine et pratiquent la navigation . . . les règles sûres de la géométrie, les théorèmes de la mathématique, les lois de la musique, cultivent les beaux-arts, — en un mot, sont la reproduction fidèle de l’état de l’humanité terrestre [they have the same disposition of the body . . . their clothes are similarly necessary; trade, war, the various needs and passions of man are over there as they are here; the inhabitants of the planets build their dwellings with an architecture similar to ours, they know navigation . . . the unfailing rules of geometry, mathematical theorems, the laws of music, they foster the fine arts, — in a word, they are a faithful reproduction of the state of humanity on this earth].” — p. 240

— 34 —

Thus there is but one absolute Upadhi . . .”
see:  T. Subba Row, “Prakriti and Parusha,” 1885: “Prakriti may be looked upon . . . as the Upadhi {vehicle} of Parabrahmam . . . As our great Sankaracharya truly observes . . . ‘Parabrahmam is Prakriti, there being no other Upadanam.’ ” — pp. 210-11 & fn. (Five Years of Theosophy)
The informing Intelligences, which animate these various centres of Being . . .”
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “The gods . . . derive their divine nature from . . . the supreme intelligence . . . All gods are, therefore, embodiments and multiplications of one and the same supreme wisdom . . .” — pp. 107-8
Dhyani Buddhas . . . Bodhisattvas . . . manifestations of that . . .”
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “There is a first, chief Buddha, Ādi Buddha . . . the being who is without beginning or end . . . ‘the supreme intelligence . . . the president of the five Dhyāni Buddhas.’ ”  “By the name of Dhyāni Buddha . . . celestial beings are designated . . . The Dhyāni Buddhas have the faculty of creating from themselves by virtue of Dhyāna, or abstract meditation, an equally celestial son, a Dhyāni Bōdhisattva . . .” — pp. 50-2

— Footnotes

the worship of the human Bodhisattvas, or Manjusri . . .
see: Ernest Eitel, Hand-book of Chinese Buddhism, 1888: “MAÑDJUŚRĪ . . . A legendary Bodhisattva . . . It is said . . . that he was in the retinue of Sākyamuni, and . . . that he is now a Buddha . . . Hiuen-tsang (A.D. 603), who saw at Mathurā a stūpa containing the remains of Mañdjuśrī’s body, connects his worship especially with the Yogātchārya School.” — pp. 94-5

— 35 —

“Seven seems to have been the sacred number par excellence . . .”
p/q: Auguste Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries among the Mayas and Quiches, 1886: “Seven seems to have been the sacred number par excellence among all civilized nations of antiquity.  Why?  This query has never been satisfactorily answered.  Each separate people has given a different explanation, according to the peculiar tenets of their religion.  That it was the number of numbers for those initiated to the sacred mysteries there can be no doubt.  Pythagoras, who had borrowed his ideas on numbers from the Egyptians, calls it the ‘Vehicle of life,’ containing body and soul, since it is formed of a quartenary, that is: Wisdom and Intellect; and a trinity or action and matter.  Emperor Julian, in Matrem [Hymn to the Mother of the Gods, § 173] and in Oratio, expresses himself thus: ‘Were I to touch upon the initiation into our secret mysteries, which the Chaldees bacchised, respecting the seven-rayed god, lighting up the soul through him, I should say things unknown to the rabble, very unknown, but well-known to the blessed Theurgists.’ ” — p. 143
Speaking of the prevalence of seven as a mystic number . . .
p/q: Auguste Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries among the Mayas and Quiches, 1886: “The prevalence of seven as a mystic number among the inhabitants of the ‘Western Continent’ is not less remarkable.  It frequently occurs in the Popol-Vuh.  We find it besides in the seven families said by Sahagun and Clavigero to have accompanied the mystical personage named Votan, the reputed founder of the great city of Nachan, identified by some with Palenque.  In the seven caves from which the ancestors of the Nahualts are reported to have emerged.  In the seven cities of Cibola, described by Coronado and Niza . . . In the seven Antilles; in the Seven heroes who, we are told, escaped the deluge.” — p. 148
In China, 1, 3, 5, 7, are called “celestial numbers” . . .
p/q: Auguste Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries among the Mayas and Quiches, 1886: “In China it occupies a conspicuous place among the celestial or perfect numbers, as 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, are called in the y-king, or Canonical book of Changes . . .” — p. 141

— Footnotes

to prove that the esoteric learning of the Aryans and the Egyptians was derived from the Mayas
see: Auguste Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries among the Mayas and Quiches, 1886: “We have already said how the Maya sages have taken care to perpetuate their cosmogonical conceptions, by causing the narrative of the creation to be carved, in high relief, over the doorway of the east façade of the palace at Chichen-Itza, and that these conceptions were identical with those of the Hindoos and the Egyptians.”  “There is every reason to believe that the cosmogonical conceptions, so widely spread, originated with the Mayas . . .” — pp. 112, 113

— 36 —

Examine the Mexican MSS . . .
see: Auguste Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries among the Mayas and Quiches, 1886: “The complex form of the mystical T . . . a reminiscence of the yaxche, the sacred tree of the Mayas . . .”  “[Illustration] From a Mexican MS. in British Museum. (Add. MS. b. m. 9789.)” — pp. 133-4
from the top of the trunk two branches shoot horizontally to the right and left . . .
p/q: Auguste Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries among the Mayas and Quiches, 1886: “The Mayas and other peoples of Central America, in the sculptures or paintings, always represented their sacred trees with two branches shooting horizontally from the top of the trunk, thus presenting the appearance of a cross or tau.” — p. 134
Man. . . . He is the mystic square . . . His symbol is the cube unfolded . . .
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “The cube unfolded becomes, in superficial display, a cross proper . . . this kind of measure was made to co-ordinate with the idea of the origin of human life . . . while the faces [of the cube] originally represented are but 6, the use of the two bars [in the cube unfolded] counts the square as 4 for the upright and 3 for the cross-bar, making 7 in all.” — pp. 50-1
“The universe . . . hath a Ruler . . . set over it . . . the First Power after the One.”
see: Ralph Cudworth, True Intellectual System, 1845: “For St. Cyril doth indeed cite several passages out of Hermaic writings . . . ‘The world hath a governor set over it, that Word of the Lord of all . . . this is the first power after himself . . .’ ” — 1:559
“The Spirit, whose essence is eternal, one and self-existent,” emanates a pure ethereal light
p/q: “Explanation of the Gods of the Hindoo Religion,” 1843: “In this authentic Sanscreet treatise, the ‘independent Spirit, whose essence is eternal, sole, and self-existent,’ is represented as, in the first place, giving birth to a certain pure ætherial light . . .” — p. 256 (Freethinkers’ Information, No. 33)

— 37 —

the dual-man, or the Androgyne . . . whose generic name is Adam Kadmon
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. Macgregor Mathers, 1887: “. . . Heavenly Man . . . the Adam Qadmon, the sephirotic image . . . And ‘the mystery of the earthly and mortal man is after the mystery of the supernal and immortal One’ . . . All souls are pre-existent in the world of emanations, and are in their original state androgynous . . .” — p. 34 (Introduction)
It is they who complete man, whose ethereal form is emanated . . .
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. Macgregor Mathers, 1887: “And Tetragrammaton Elohim formed the substance of man, completed (him) formation by formation from the most ethereal (portion) of the refined (element of) earth . . . ‘Ophir Men Ha-Adamah, from the dust of the ground’ . . .” — pp. 226-7 (Greater Holy Assembly, xxxix.929, 937)
the foundation of the Kabala and all its mystic books is made to rest upon the ten Sephiroth
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “The foundation of the mystic books of the Cabbalah, already spoken on, is made to rest upon the Ten Sephiroth . . .” — p. 266 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
[Diagram] wherein the circle is the naught, its vertical diameter line . . . primal one . . .
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . the Ten Sephiroth, or the 10 Numbers, the picture of which is this:
Diagram
wherein the circle is the naught, its vertical diameter line is the first or primal One, — from which springs the 2, the 3, and so on to 9, the limit of the digits.” — p. 266 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
 
The 10 is the first Divine Manifestation containing “every possible power . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “This 10 is the first Divine Manifestation, which contains every possible power of exact expression of proportion . . .” — p. 266 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
the Sephiroth “were the numbers or emanations of the Heavenly Light . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . these Sephiroth were the numbers or emanations of the heavenly Light (20612 to 6561), they were the 10 Words, DBRIM, 41224, the light of which they were the flux was the Heavenly man, the Adam-KDM, (the 144 – 144); and the Light, by the New Testament or Covenant (41224), created God; just as by the Old Testament God (Alhim, 31415) creates Light (20612 to 6561).” — p. 266 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
the three lights are described as: — (1) The clear and penetrating, that of Jehovah . . .
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “There are three kinds of light: — (1) clear and penetrating, that of Jehovah, — (2) reflected light. — and (3) light in the abstract.” — p. 266 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— 37-8 —

“This light abstractly taken (in a metaphysical or symbolical sense) is Alhim . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “This Light, abstractly taken, (in a metaphysical or symbolic sense) is Alhim (Elohim, God) while the clear penetrating Light is Jehovah.  The light of Alhim belongs to the world in general, in its allness and general fulness, but the light of Jehovah is that pertaining to the chiefest production, man, whom this light penetrated to and made.” — p. 266 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— 38 —

The author . . . refers the reader to Inman’s “Ancient Faiths embodied in Ancient Names” . . .
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “For the penetrating power of light and its effect, see Inman’s Ancient Faiths under Ancient Names, Vol. 2, page 648.” — p. 266 fn. (Masonic Review, v. 65)
an engraving of “the vesica piscis, Mary and the female emblem . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “As to the pictures, the author [Inman] says: ‘The vesica piscis, Mary, and the female emblem, copied from a Rosary of the blessed Virgin Mary, which was printed at Venice, 1542, with a license from the Inquisition, and consequently orthodox.’ ” — p. 266 fn. (Masonic Review, v. 65)
Occultists call this light Daiviprakriti in the East . . . It is the light of the logos
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — I,” Feb. 1887: “This Logos may be called . . . the divine Christos who is eternally in the bosom of his father.”  “In the same manner Parabrahmam radiates from the Logos, and manifests itself as the light and energy of the Logos.”  “This light from the Logos is called Daiviprakriti in the Bhagavad Gita . . .” — pp. 303, 305 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
“To the fulness of the world in general . . . the term Elohim-Jehovah applies . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “To the fulness of the world in general with its chiefest content, man, the term Elohim-Jehovah applies.  In extracts from Sohar, the Rev. Dr. Cassel, to prove that the Cabbalah sets forth the doctrine of the Trinity, among other things says: ‘Jehovah is Elohim (Alhim). . . . That is, — by three steps God, (Alhim) and Jehovah became the same, and though separated, each and together they are of the same One.’ ” — p. 266-7 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
Vishnu . . . “striding through the seven regions of the Universe in three steps.”
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In the Ṛig-veda Vishṇu is . . . described as striding through the seven regions of the universe in three steps . . .” — p. 360
“Now light . . . as shown, is 20612 to 6521 . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “Now Light, as shown, is 20612 to 6561, as the proper enunciation of the integral and numerical relation of diameter to circumference of a circle.  God (Alhim, that is 31415 to One, a modified form of the above) is the reduction of this, so as to obtain a standard unite One, as the basis, in general, of all calculation and all mensuration.  But for the production of animal life, and for especial time measure, or the lunar year, that influence which causes conception and embryotic development, the numbers of the Jehovah measure (the ‘man even Jehovah’ measure), viz., 113 to 355, have to be specialized.” — p. 267 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— Footnotes

See “Source of Measures,” pp. 276, et seq. App. VII
see: J. Ralston Skinner, Source of Measures, 1875: “The first sentence in 4 Gen. 1, is: ‘And Adam knew Eve, his wife; and she conceived and bare Cain, and said, I have gotten a man from the Lord’ . . . A better and more literal rendering is: ‘. . . I have measured a man, even Jehovah.’ ” — pp. 276-7 (Appendix VII)

— 38-9 —

“But this last ratio is but a modified form of light . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “But this last ratio is but a modified form of Light, or 20612 to 6561, as a pi value, being only a variation of the same (that is 20612 to 6561 is 31415 to one, and 355 to 113 is 31415 to one, or Alhim or God), — and in such a manner that one can be made to flow into and be derived from the other: — and these are the three steps by which the Unity and sameness can be shown of the Divine names.  That is, the two are but variations of a same ratio, viz., that of pi.  The object of this comment is to show the same symbolic measuring use for the Cabbalah, as taught, with that of the Three Covenants of the Bible, and with that of Masonry as just noticed.” — p. 267 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— 39 —

“First then, the Sephiroth are described as Light . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “First then, the Sephiroth are described as Light, that is, they themselves are a function of, indeed, the same as, the manifestation of the Ain-Soph; and they are so from the fact that ‘Light’ represents the ratio of 20612 to 6561, as part of the ‘Words,’ DBRIM, 41224, or, as to the Word, Dabar, 206 (= 10 cubits).  ‘Light’ is so much the burden of the Cabbalah as to explaining the Sephiroth, that the most famous book on the Cabbalah is called Sohar or ‘Light.’ ” — p. 267 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“In this we find . . . ‘The Infinite was entirely unknown and diffused no light . . .’ ”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “In this we find expressions of this kind: ‘The Infinite was entirely unknown and diffused no light before the luminous point violently broke through into vision’ — ‘When He first assumed the form (of the crown, or the first Sephira,) He caused 9 splendid lights to emanate from it, which, shining through it, diffused a bright light in all directions:’ — that is, these 9 with his one (which was the origin, as above, of the 9), together, made the 10, that is Image1, or Image2, or the sacred Ten (numbers, or Sephiroth), or Jod, — and these numbers were ‘the Light.’  Just as in the Gospel of St. John, God (Alhim, 31415 to one) was that Light (20612 to 6561) by which (Light) all things were made.” — pp. 267-8 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“by which (Light) all things were made”
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “In the beginning was the Word . . . and the Word was God. . . . All things were made by him . . . In him was life; and the life was the light of men.” — p. 120 (John, 1:1, 3-4)
we find Plato stating the deity geometrizes in fabricating the Universe
see: Plato, Works, v. 2, tr. Henry Davis, 1849: “. . . it is the business of geometry to concern itself with eternal being.”  “And think you not then, that the true astronomer will feel just the same, when he looks up to the orbits of the stars, — reckoning, indeed, that the heavens and all in them are established by the heavenly architect in the most beautiful manner possible for the formation of such works . . .” — pp. 216, 220 (Republic, vii.9, 11)
The Kabalistic book, the Sepher Jezirah, opens with a statement of the hidden wisdom . . .
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “The Cabbalistic book, the Sepher Jetzirah . . . opens with a statement of the hidden wisdom of God (Alhim), in Sephrim, (Sephiroth).” — p. 268 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“In thirty and two paths, hidden wisdom, established Jah, jhvh . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “ ‘In thirty and two paths, hidden wisdom, established Jah, IHVH, Tzbaoth, Elohi of Israel, Alhim of Life, El of Grace and Mercy, — exalted uplifted Dweller on high, and King of Everlasting, and His name, — Holy! in Three Sephrim, viz., B—S’ph-r, V—S’ph-r, V—Siph-o-r.’ ” — p. 268 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“This Comment sets forth ‘the Hidden Wisdom’ of the original text . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “This comment sets forth the ‘hidden wisdom’ of this original text by hidden wisdom, that is, by the use of words carrying a special set of numbers and a special phraseology, which will set forth the very explanatory system which we find to fit so accurately in the Hebrew Bible . . .” — p. 268 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— 39-40 —

“In setting forth his scheme . . . the one word Sephrim (Sephiroth) . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “In setting forth his scheme, to enforce it, and to finish out his detailed exposition in a general postulate, — viz., the one word ‘Sephrim’ (Sephiroth), of the Number Jetzirah, the author explains the separation of this word in the three subordinate ones, a play upon a common word s-ph-r, or number.” — p. 268 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— 40 —

The prince Al-Chazari says to the Rabbi: — “I wish now that thou wouldest impart to me . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “The prince Al-Chazari says to the Rabbi: ‘I wish now that thou wouldest impart to me some of the chiefest or leading principles of Natural Philosophy, which, as thou sayst, were in former times worked out by them (the ancient wise ones);’ — to which the Rabbi makes answer: ‘To such principles appertains the Number of Creation of our race-father Abraham’ (that is Abram and Abraham, or numbers 41224 and 41252).” — pp. 268-9 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
He then says that this book of Number treats of teaching the Alhim-ness and One-ness . . .
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “He then says that this book or number treats of teaching the ‘Alhim-ness and One-ness through (DBRIM)’ viz., the numbers of the word ‘Words.’  That is, it teaches the use of the ratio 31415 to One, through 41224, which last, in the description of the Ark of the Covenant, was divided into two parts by the two tables of stone on which these DBRIM, or 41224, were written or engraved, — or 20612 x 2.  He then comments on these three subordinately used words, and takes care as to one of them to make the comment, ‘And Alhim (31415 to One) said let there be Light (20612 to 6561).’ ” — p. 269 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
The three words as given in the text are: ספר ספר סיפור . . .
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “The words as given in the text are — ספר ספר סיפור and the Rabbi, in commenting on them, says: ‘It teaches the Alhim-ness (31415) and One-ness (the diameter to Alhim), through Words (DBRIM = 41224), by which on the one side there is infinite expression in heterogeneous creations, and on the other side a final harmonic tendency to One-ness’ (which, as every one knows, is the mathematical function of pi of the schools, which measures, weighs, and numbers the stars of heaven, and yet resolves them back into the final oneness of the Uni-verse) — ‘through Words . . .’ ” — p. 269 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“Their final accord perfects itself in that Oneness . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “ ‘Their final accord perfects itself in that One-ness that ordains them, and which consists in ספר ספר סיפור’ that is, the Rabbi, in his first comment, leaves the jod, or i, out of one of the words, whereas afterward he restores it again.  If we take the values of these subordinate words, we find them to be 340, 340 and 346; — together these are 1026, and the division of the general word into these has been to produce these numbers, — which, by T’mura, may be changed in various ways, for various purposes.” — p. 269 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
turn to Stanza IV. . . . to find . . . the number of the 21 Prajâpati . . .
see: Stanza IV, 3: “In the Mahabhārata the Prajāpati are 21 in number, or ten, six, and five (1065), thrice seven.” — SD 1:90

— 40-1 —

Jehovah is but a lunar and “generation” god.  (See Book 1 . . .)
see: “The Moon, Deus Lunus, Phœbe”: “For the ‘Fathers’ — such as Origen or Clemens Alexandrinus — the Moon was Jehovah’s living symbol: the giver of Life and the giver of Death, the disposer of being — in our World.” — SD 1:387

— 41 —

primal intelligence . . . It cannot be comprehended, nor can it be located . . .
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . the wise men who enunciated the Cabbalah dealt first with the fact of a primal intelligence . . . This intelligence, they declared, could not be comprehended at all, — could not be located, — could not be named, though the cause of all.  They, therefore, designated it by a term of negation, and called it the Ain Soph, — the inscrutable, the unknowable, the unnameable.” — p. 257 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
His remarks are quoted in Part II. . . .
see: “The Theogony of the Creative Gods” [quoting J. Ralston Skinner], SD 1:429, 432, 443-4.
“Mental perception . . . to become physical perception . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “But mental perception, to become physical perception, must have the cosmic principle of Light: — and, by this, our mental circle must become visible through light; or, for its complete manifestation the circle must be that of physical visibility, or Light itself.  Such conceptions, thus formulated, became the ground-work of the philosophy of the Divine manifesting in the universe.” — p. 258 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“under s’ph-r is to be understood calculation and weighing . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “ ‘Under s’ph-r is to be understood, — calculation and weighing of created bodies.  For the calculation, by means of which a body must be constructed in harmony or symmetry, by which it must be in construction rightly arranged and made to correspond to the object in design, consists at last in number, extension, mass, weight; — co ordinate relation of movements, then harmony of music, must consist altogether by number, that is s’ph-r.’ ” — p. 270 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“By Sippor (s’phor) is to be understood the words of Alhim . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “ ‘By Sippor (s’phor) is to be understood the words of Alhim . . . whereunto joins or adapts itself the design to the frame or form of construction; for example, — it was said “Let Light be.”  The work became as the words were spoken, that is, as the numbers of the work came forth.’ ” — p. 270 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— 42 —

“Sankhya” Philosophy . . . Purusha mounts on the shoulders of Prakriti . . .
see: Monier Williams, Hinduism, 1880: “But although Prakṛiti is the sole originator of creation, yet, according to the pure Sānkhya, it does not . . . create at all to any practical purpose unless it comes into union with Purusha . . . But each separate soul . . . is a looker on, uniting itself with unintelligent Prakṛiti, as a lame man mounted on a blind man’s shoulders . . .” — p. 197
Evolution, not creation, by means of words . . . in the philosophies of the East
see: Joseph H. Allen, “The Mind of Paganism,” Feb. 1880: “The world is seen as the successive emanations and withdrawals of the divine Reason, the eternal Logos [the Word]. . . . Thus the fundamental conception is not creation, but evolution or emanation.” — p. 124 (Unitarian Review, v. 13)
see: The Upanishads, Part I, tr. F. Max Müller, 1879: “How the one Sat became many, how what we call the creation, what they call emanation . . . constantly proceeds and returns to it, has been explained . . . by ancient prophets and poets.” — p. xxxi (Preface)
Ex oriente lux.
see: “The Upanishads,” Oct. 1881: “ ‘. . . at present we may perceive shining through, in the writings of the learned, the native pantheism of India . . . ex oriente lux [out of the East, light].’ . . . Schopenhauer’s words are useful in this respect that they call attention to a fact . . . that there is a school of modern thought which . . . sets a high value on an ancient literature which can be held up as an early possession of our race . . .” — p. 256 (The Month, v. 43)
the name of the first man . . . Müller’s negation notwithstanding
see: F. Max Müller, Introduction to the Science of Religion, 1873: “If the first man were called in Sanskrit Adima, and in Hebrew Adam, and if the two were really the same word, then Hebrew and Sanskrit could not be members of two different families of speech . . .” — p. 302
(Ad-ad, “the only one”)
p/q: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “. . . Macrobius states that Adad meant ‘the only one’ in Syrian . . .” — p. 231 (Lecture IV)
in Assyrian, “father” whence Ak-Ad or “father-creator”
see: François Lenormant, Chaldean Magic, 1877: “The sign meaning ‘father,’ in the Assyrian abu, is phonetically at or ad, because the word ‘father’ was ad . . . in the Accadian . . .” — p. 357
see: C. Staniland Wake, Serpent-Worship, 1888: “In Assyrian . . . ak signifies a ‘Creator’ . . .” — p. 111
Vide Part II. of this Volume, § “Adam-Adami.”
see: “Adam-Adami,” SD 2:452-8.

— Footnotes

Ak-Ad meaning “Son of Ad” (like the sons of Ad in Ancient Arabia).
see: C. Staniland Wake, Serpent-Worship, 1888: “Thus Ak(k)-Ad may well be ‘the sons or lineage of Ad’ . . .”  “Nor is the idea that the Chaldean Akkad were literally ‘the sons of Ad’ without historical basis.” — pp. 110, 111
Ad-ad . . . was the Ad-on or ‘Lord’ . . . and consort of Ad-ar-gat . . .
see: J. Lemprière, Bibliotheca Classica, 1833: “Adad, an Assyrian deity supposed to be the sun. (Macrobius) . . . states, that the name Adad means ‘One’ . . . and that the goddess Adargatis was assigned to this deity as his spouse . . .”  “ ‘Adonis, or Adonai . . . was an Oriental title of the sun, signifying Lord . . .’ ” — 1:26, 27
Gan-Æden (Eden) or Gandunia was Babylonia
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “. . . the primitive home of Tammuz had been in that ‘garden’ of Edin [Gan ’Eden], or Eden, which Babylonian tradition placed in the immediate vicinity of Eridu.” — pp. 237-8 (Lecture IV)
see: François Lenormant, Chaldean Magic, 1877: “. . . Gan-Dunyas, as numerous examples bear witness, is a designation for the particular district of Babylon, called since the time of the Cissian dynasty the city of Kar-Dunyas.” — p. 393
According to Swedenborg’s mysticism Adam was not a man but a church . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1887: “According to the doctrines of Swedenborg, Adam signified not a man, but a church of Primitive Light.” — p. 17

— 43 —

“The breath returning to the eternal bosom . . .”
see: A. E. Waite, The Mysteries of Magic, 1886: “. . . O Imperishable Breath of Life . . . which dost breathe forth and draw in the life of all beings in the ebb and flow of thine eternal speech . . .” — p. 122 (“Writings of Éliphas Lévi”)
Adam Kadmon . . . “The first emanation of the Father-Mother or divine nature”
see: Isaac Myer, “Hindu Symbolism — II,” Nov. 1886: “The androgene or male-female, the Great Appearance . . . under the form of the double-sexed first emanation. . . . This symbol, the divine type of the first male and female . . . the Adam Kadmon or Heavenly Adam of the Kabbalah.” — pp. 251-2 (The Path, v. 1)
Aditi and Vâch . . . “Mothers of all living” and “of the gods”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “Aditi is called Deva-mātṛi, ‘mother of the gods’ . . . In the Vishṇu Purāṇa . . . she is called ‘the mother of the gods’ and ‘the mother of the world.’ ” — p. 3
see: Texts of the White Yajurveda, tr. Ralph T. H. Griffith, 1899: “Aditi: regarded as the Cosmic Cow . . .”  “. . . Aditi the General Mother of all living beings.” — pp. 29 fn., 273 fn.

— Footnotes [43-44]

“It takes earth and water to create a human soul”
p/q: Henry Cornelius Agrippa, Three Books of Occult Philosophy, 1898: “For Moses writes, that only Earth and Water bring forth a living soul.” — 1:45
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.  And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.” — p. 3 (Genesis, 2:6-7)
Mars is identical with Kartikeya . . . born without the intervention of a woman . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “KĀRTTIKEYA.  The god of war and the planet Mars . . . He is said in the Mahā-bhārata and Ramāyaṇa to be the son of Śiva or Rudra, and to have been produced without the intervention of a woman.” — p. 152
born of the Sweat of Siva, Sivâ Gharmaja and the Earth . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “MANGALA.  The planet Mars, identified with Kārtikeya, the god of war.  He was a son of Śiva and the Earth . . . He is also called Śiva-gharma-ja, ‘born of the sweat of Śiva’ . . . [and] Lohita, ‘the red’ . . .” — p. 198
“Mars . . . being the god of war and of bloodshed . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “Mars . . . his being the god of war, and of bloodshed, was but a secondary idea flowing out of the primary one of shedding blood in conception, for the first time.” — p. 186

— 44 —

“Man was created by the Sephiroth . . . and they engendered . . . the earthly Adam.”
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Man was at length created by the ten Sephiroth (the Heavenly Adam), and they engendered by common power the earthly Adam.” — p. 411
“Behold Man is become as one of us.”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And the Lord God said, ‘Behold, the man is become as one of us.” — p. 4 (Genesis, 3:22)
Brahmâ-Prajâpati creates Virâj and the Rishis . . . called “the Mind-born sons of Brahmâ”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “PRAJĀ-PATI.  ‘Lord of creatures,’ a progenitor, creator. . . . and as the secondary creator of the ten Ṛishis, or ‘mind-born sons’ of Brahmā, from whom mankind has descended.  It is to these ten sages, as fathers of the human race, that the name Prajā-pati most commonly is given.” — p. 239
I shall send thee a fire when thy work is commenced. . . . Thou art not ready.”
see: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “These [progenitors] all create men, but fail in their final object.  Desiring to endow man with an immortal spirit . . . Prometheus fails in his attempt to steal the divine fire . . . In the Codex Nazaræus we see Bahak-Zivo . . . unable to ‘construct creatures,’ for he is equally unacquainted with . . . ‘the consuming fire which is wanting in light.’ ” — 1:298
Kumuda-Pati is the Moon . . . in his region of Soma-loka
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In the Purāṇic mythology Soma, as the moon . . . son of Dharma [a Prajāpati] . . .”  “The moon has many names . . . Kumuda-pati, ‘lord of the lotus’ . . .” — pp. 302, 303
the Pitris (Pitar or “Fathers”) are sons of the Gods
see: Theodore Goldstücker, Literary Remains, 1879: “Pitṛi (a Sanscrit word literally meaning father . . . in the plural Pitaras . . . Anglicised to Pitṛis) . . .”  “The Pitṛis reside in a world of their own, called Pitṛi-loka, which is sometimes supposed to be the moon . . .” — 1:133, 134
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “PITṚIS. . . . the fathers . . . the first Pitṛis were the sons of the gods.” — p. 235
they are generally known as the “lunar” ancestors
see: Louis Jacolliot, Histoire des Vierges, 1874: “. . . les pitris, ancêtres lunaires du genre humain [the Pitris, the lunar ancestors of the human race].” — p. 34
Pitri-pati is the lord or king of the Pitris, Yama, the god of Death and the Judge of mortals.
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “PITṚI-PATI.  ‘The lord of the Manes.’  Yama, judge of the dead.” — p. 236

— Footnotes

one who commands war. . . . the aggressive Zodh
see: C. de Beauvoir Stocks, “Folk-lore and Customs of the Lap-chas of Sikhim,” 1925: “. . . the Spirit of the Kangchen-Dzod-Nga . . . who is shortly called Dzod-nga . . . He is represented as the War-God in Sikhim . . .” — p. 357 fn. (Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, N.S. XXI)
Cain . . . [slew his] “brother,” whose “blood crieth from the ground” . . .
p/q: Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And the Lord said unto Cain . . . the voice of thy brother’s blood crieth unto me from the ground.  And now art thou cursed from the earth, which hath opened her mouth to receive thy brother’s blood from thy hand . . .” — p. 5 (Genesis, 4:9-11)
Apollo Karneios is . . . the Hindu Krishna Karna.  “Karna” means radiant . . .
p/q: Edward Balfour, Cyclopædia of India, 1885: “The Greeks and Celts worshipped Apollo under the title of Carneios, which . . . is derived from Carnos . . . One of the titles of Krishna, the Hindu Apollo, is Carna, ‘the radiant,’ from Carna, a ray . . .” — 3:922

— 45 —

the son of the Moon (Soma) is Budha (Mercury), “the intelligent” and the Wise
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘. . . Verily, thou art wise.’  And, hence, his name was Budha {‘He who knows.’  Much erroneous speculation has originated in confounding this Budha, the son of Soma, and regent of the planet Mercury, — ‘he who knows,’ ‘the intelligent,’ — with Buddha, any deified mortal, or ‘he by whom truth is known’; or, as individually applicable, Gautama or Śākya . . . The two characters have nothing in common}.” — 4:4, 4-5 fn. (iv.6)
the “first War in Heaven,” the Târaka-mâya
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Then there ensued a fierce contest, which, being on account of Tārakā (or Tārā), was termed the Tārakā-maya or Tārakā war.” — 4:3 (iv.6)
Brihaspati . . . whose wife Târâ . . . had been carried away by the Moon, Soma
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Soma . . . carried off Tārā, the wife of Bṛihaspati, the preceptor of the gods. . . . Soma refused to relinquish her.  Uśanas, out of enmity to Bṛihaspati, took part with Soma.” — 4:2 (iv.6)

— Footnotes

Brihaspati . . . or Brahmanaspati . . . is priest sacrificer . . . the Purohita . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In the Ṛig-veda the names of Bṛihaspati and Brahmanaspati alternate . . . He is the suppliant, the sacrificer, the priest, who intercedes with gods on behalf of men . . . and is also designated as the Purohita (family priest) of the divine community.” — p. 63

— 46 —

Man’s organism was adapted in every race to its surroundings. . . . (see Part III. of this Volume)
see: “Organic Evolution and Creative Centres,” SD 2:731-41.
the changeless (avikâra) immutable nature (Essence, sadaikarûpa) . . .”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “[Vishṇu] is Avikāra, not subject to change: Sadaikarūpa, one invariable nature . . .” — 1:14-15 fn.
“(a state of) causality (vyakta), from invisible it became visible
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . he is the indiscrete (Avyakta) cause of the world, as well as the discrete (Vyakta) effect; or the invisible cause and visible creation.” — 1:15 fn.

— 46-7 —

The smallest of the small (the most atomic of atoms, or aniyâmsam aniyâsam)”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the smallest of the small {Aṇīyāṃsam aṇīyasāṃ . . . ‘the most atomic of the atomic’} . . .” — 1:15 & fn.

— 47 —

became one and the many (ekanekárûpa)”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “[Vishṇu] is both single and manifold (Ekānekarūpa) . . .” — 1:15 fn.
the earth . . . Sarpa Rajni, “the Queen of the Serpents,” and “the mother of all that moves”
p/q: Aitareya Brahmanam, tr. Martin Haug, 1863: “They chant the verses (seen) by the Queen of the Serpents (Sarpa-rājnī); because the earth (iyam) is the Queen of the Serpents, for she is the queen of all that moves (sarpat).” — 2:358-9 (Bk V: iv.23)
Narada, the son of Brahmâ in Matsya Purâna
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘Brahmā then created mind-begotten sons . . .’ ”  “The Matsya agrees with Manu, in adding Nārada to the list . . .” — 1:101 fn.
Narada . . . the progeny of Kasyapa and the daughter of Daksha
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . it was agreed . . . that Nārada should be again born, as the son of Kaśyapa, by one of Daksha’s daughters.” — 2:18 fn.

— Footnotes

Achyuta . . . not subject to fall . . . the Unfalling . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ACHYUTA.  ‘Unfallen;’ a name of Vishṇu or Kṛishṇa.  It has been variously interpreted as signifying ‘he who does not perish with created things’ . . . and in the Skanda Purāṇa as ‘he who never declines (or varies) from his proper nature.’ ” — p. 2
it is the reverse of chyuta, “the Fallen”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “[He] who is in all created things; the unchanged, imperishable {Or Achyuta . . . a common name of Vishṇu, from a privative and Chyuta, fallen} . . .” — 1:15 & fn.

— 48 —

He is . . . Deva Rishi (divine Rishi, more than a demi-god)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . divine Ṛishis, (or sages who are demigods also, as Nārada) . . .” — 3:68 (iii.6)
yet he is cursed by Daksha and even by Brahmâ
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The Mahā-bhārata and some Purāṇas state that he [Nārada] frustrated the scheme which Daksha had formed for peopling the earth, and consequently incurred that patriarch’s curse to enter again the womb of a woman and be born.”  “The Nārada-pancha-rātra relates that Brahmā advised his son Nārada to marry, but Nārada censured his father as a false teacher . . . Brahmā then cursed Nārada to lead a life of sensuality . . .” — pp. 218, 219
He informs Kansa that Bhagavat . . . would incarnate in the eighth child of Devaki . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Nārada informed Kaṃsa that the supporter of the earth, Vishṇu {Bhagavat} would be the eighth child of Devakī; and, his wrath being excited by this report, he placed both Vasudeva and Devakī in confinement.” — 4:259 & fn. (v.1)
from the cloud on which he is seated . . . he lauds Krishna . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Kṛishṇa stood, unharmed and smiling, after the destruction of the demon . . . Nārada, the Brahman, invisible, seated in a cloud, beheld the fall of Keśin, and delightfully exclaimed: ‘Well done! lord of the universe . . .’ ” — 4:340-1 (v.16)
Narada — who is called . . . Pesh-Hun, the “Messenger”
see: Monier Williams, Sanskrit-English Dictionary, 1872: “Piśuna . . . an epithet of Nārada (the messenger and informant of the gods) . . .” — p. 576
“Kali-Kâraka,” strife-maker, “Kapi-vaktra,” monkey-faced . . . Deva-Brahmâ
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “. . . Nārada should be born again of Brahmā and one of Daksha’s daughters; he was hence called . . . Deva-brahmā.”  “Nārada has the appellations, Kali-kāraka, ‘strife-maker;’ Kapi-vaktra, ‘monkey-faced;’ Piśuna, ‘messenger or spy.’ ”— p. 219
Sir W. Jones . . . calls him “the eloquent messenger of the gods”
p/q: The Book of God: The Apocalypse of Adam-Oannes [by E. V. H. Kenealy], 1867: “A very distinguished son of Brahma . . . named Narad, (says Jones), whose actions are the subject of a Purana, bears a strong resemblance to Hermes, or Mercury.  He was . . . an eloquent Messenger of the gods . . .” — p. 60
see: Sir William Jones, “On the Gods of Greece, Italy, and India,” 1798: “. . . Nāred, whose actions are the subject of a Purāna, bears a strong resemblance to Hermes or Mercury: he was . . . an eloquent messenger of the Gods . . .” — p. 265 (Asiatick Researches, v. 1)
a great Rishi, “who is for ever wandering about the earth, giving good counsel” . . .
p/q: The Book of God: The Apocalypse of Adam-Oannes [by E. V. H. Kenealy], 1867: “The Hindus preserve the tradition in the name Narad, whom they believe to be a great Prophet, who is for ever wandering about the earth, giving good counsel.” — p. 60

— Footnotes

Brahmâ had communicated to Narada . . . that all men whatsoever, even Mlechchhas . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The Bhāgavata is communicated to the Ṛishis . . . it was originally communicated by Brahmā to Nārada, that all men whatsoever, Hindus of every caste, and even Mlechchhas, outcasts or barbarians, might learn to have faith in Vāsudeva.” — 1:xl-xli (Preface)

— 49 —

Narada . . . visits the so-called nether or infernal regions, Pâtâla.
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “[Nārada] also went down to the infernal regions (Pātāla), and was delighted with what he saw there.” — p. 219
the thousand-headed Sesha . . . who bears . . . the entire world like a diadem . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Below the seven Pātālas is the form of Vishṇu, proceeding from the quality of darkness, which is called Śesha {the great serpent on which Vishṇu sleeps during the intervals of creation} . . . He has a thousand heads . . . and the thousand jewels in his crests give light to all the regions. . . . Śesha bears the entire world, like a diadem, upon his head; and he is the foundation on which the seven Pātālas rest.” — 2:211-12 & fn. (ii.5)

— Footnotes

having given his astronomical knowledge to Garga . . . who propitiated him . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The ancient sage Garga {One of the oldest writers on astronomy amongst the Hindus}, having propitiated Śesha, acquired from him a knowledge of the principles of astronomical science, of the planets, and of the good and evil denoted by the aspects of the heavens.” — 2:213 & fn. (ii.5)

— 49-50 —

Asuramaya, to whom the epic tradition points as the earliest astronomer . . .
p/q: Albrecht Weber, The History of Indian Literature, 1882: “The epic tradition, again, gives as the earliest astronomer the Asura Maya, and asserts that to him the sun-god himself imparted the knowledge of the stars.” — p. 253

— 50 —

identified . . . with the “Ptolemaios” of the Greeks . . .
p/q: Albrecht Weber, The History of Indian Literature, 1882: “. . . this ‘Asura Maya’ is identical with the ‘Ptolemaios’ of the Greeks; since this latter name, as we see from the inscriptions of Piyadasi, became in Indian ‘Turamaya,’ out of which the name ‘Asura Maya’ might very easily grow . . .” — p. 253
“since this Maya is distinctly assigned to Romaka-pura in the West”
p/q: Albrecht Weber, The History of Indian Literature, 1882: “. . . and since, by the later tradition (that of the Jnāna-bhāskara, for instance) this Maya is distinctly assigned to Romaka-pura in the West.” — p. 253
Weber . . . [thinks] Hindus never knew of a Zodiac . . . till “they had borrowed one . . .”
p/q: Albrecht Weber, The History of Indian Literature, 1882: “. . . the signs of the zodiac, which were unquestionably borrowed by the Hindūs from the Greeks . . .” — p. 229
(Vide “The Zodiac and its Antiquity”)
see: “The Zodiac and Its Antiquity”: “M. Bailly, the famous French astronomer . . . asserts that the Hindu systems of astronomy are by far the oldest . . . [p. 658].” — SD 1:647-68
“in addition to the natural obstacles which impede investigation . . .”
p/q: Albrecht Weber, The History of Indian Literature, 1882: “. . . in addition to the natural obstacles which impede investigation, there still prevails a dense mist of prejudice and preconceived opinions hovering over the land, and enfolding it as with a veil.” — p. 2

— 50-1 —

the calendar elsewhere mentioned . . . (But see “Chronology of the Brahmins” . . .)
see: “The Chronology of the Brahmins”: “The best and most complete of all such calendars . . . is the already mentioned Tamil calendar called the ‘Tirukkanda Panchanga’ . . . [et seq.].”— SD 2:67-70

— 51 —

The work . . . relates to the chonology of the orthodox teachings.
see: Edward Balfour, Cyclopædia of India, 1885: “. . . the Samvat, or era of Vikramaditya, which follows the luni-solar reckoning, is also extensively employed in the ordinary affairs of life.  The almanac being thus a necessity, great numbers of almanacs are published in all the principal languages. . . . The Hindu almanac is everywhere called Panchanga, because it must exhibit five (pancha) distinct matters: — 1. the tithi or lunar day; 2. the vara or solar day of the week; 3. the nakshatra or lunar asterism for each day; 4. the yoga, the conjunctions and transits of the planets, eclipses, etc.; 5. the karanas or subdivisions of the lunar day.” — 3:100

— Footnotes

The “Tirukkanda Panchanga
see: R. S. Perinbanayagam, The Karmic Theater, 1982: “The information in these Pancānkams is used to order the activities of everyday life.  One of the Pancānkams is known as the Vākiya Pancānkam, the other is known as the Tirukkanita Pancānkam, and both claim the same sage, one Rāmalinga Munivar, as the founder. . . . Rāmalinga Munivar appears to have arrived in Jaffna in the seventeenth century and to have put into palm-leaf manuscripts what was an oral tradition.” — p. 46
for the Kali Yug 4986 [1884-1885]
see: Monier Williams, Indian Wisdom, 1875: “The present Kali-yuga is reckoned to have begun February 18th, 3102 b.c. . . .” — p. 333 fn.

— 52 —

chaos on Earth . . . in which monsters . . . were generated
see: Gerald Massey, The Natural Genesis, 1883: “The Egyptians had their museum of monsters . . .”  “. . . it is feasible that the mythical dragon of the abyss, the waters of source, was founded on the crocodile . . . The crocodile was a type of the first goddess, Typhon.  And if there be a first god in Egyptian mythology it is Sevekh, her son, who bore her image as the Crocodile. . . . The Egyptian mythology begins with the Eight gods that ruled Am-Smen, the Place of Preparation or of Chaos.”  “The Eight then are composed of the genitrix Typhon and her brood of Seven. . . . the Seven Children of Revolt . . . {Ritual, ch. xvii}.” — 1:320-2 & fn.
also in the Chaldean account of creation, on the Cutha Tablets
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “Men with the bodies of birds of the desert, human beings . . . with the faces of ravens . . . in the midst of the earth they grew up and became great . . . Seven kings brothers of the same family . . .” — p. 103 (“Legend of Creation from Cutha Tablet”)

— Footnotes

“the plants came into being three ages (Triyugam) before the gods”
p/q: H. W. Wallis, The Cosmology of the Rig Veda, 1887: “In one passage at the beginning of the well-known physician’s hymn, we read that ‘the plants came into being three ages before the gods {triyugām X. 97. 1}.’ ” — p. 96 & fn.

— 53 —

repeated in the account of Pymander
see: The Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1884: “And the Circulation . . . out of the lower or downward-born Elements, brought forth unreasonable or brutish Creatures . . .” — p. 10 (ii.16)
The verses . . . checked by the Cosmogony, as given by Berosus . . .
see: Ancient Fragments, comp. Isaac Preston Cory, 1832: “The first fragment preserved by Alexander Polyhistor . . . the Chaos is pourtrayed by the confusion of limbs of every kind of animal . . .” — pp. xi-xii (Preface)
      “There was a time in which there existed nothing but darkness and an abyss of waters, wherein resided most hideous beings . . . human figures were to be seen with the legs and horns of goats: some had horses’ feet: while others united the hind quarters of a horse with the body of a man . . .” — pp. 23-4 (Berosus, “Of the Cosmogony and Deluge”)
“The water-men terrible and bad”
see: Gerald Massey, The Hebrew and Other Creations, 1887: “. . . the pre-Adamite races of men . . . were the primitive people of the past . . . who were held to have been created without souls . . .”  “Seven such races are described in the Bundahish . . . as the earth-men, the men of the water . . . and the men with tails.  These were the soulless people.” — pp. 24, 25
the great Deep (the Watery Abyss . . .) was the birthplace and abode of Ea, Wisdom
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “. . . with the early Akkadian philosophers of Eridu, there was not anything unholy in the watery abyss, the home and mother of Ea or Wisdom . . .” — p. 244
But with the Semites . . . the fathomless Deep of Wisdom becomes . . . sinful Substance
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “But in the Semitic account, the abyss is the chaotic opposition to the present order of nature and is evil.” — pp. 244-5
and Ea is changed into Tiamat, the dragon slain by Merodach
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The old Akkadian deity of Wisdom, Ea or Hea, was a sea or water god who lived in the Great Crystalline Sea . . . and who was called: ‘mighty bond of heaven and earth.’ ”  “In the later or Semitic period, a new idea appears, Merodach the sun-god of light, has a struggle with Tiamat considered as the evil dragon of darkness, which ends in the defeat of the latter . . .” — pp. 243-4
two great creations are mentioned, the Padma and the Vârâha, the present
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “When the three worlds are but one mighty ocean, Brahmā . . . sleeps upon his serpent-bed . . . for a night of equal duration with his day; at the close of which he creates anew {The only Kalpas usually specified are . . . the last, or the Pādma, and the present or Vārāha}.” — 1:52-3 & fn. (i.3)
when the Earth was lifted out of the water by Brahmâ, in the shape of a boar . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “Boar Incarnation [Varāha Avatāra] . . . the creator Prajāpati, afterwards known as Brahmā, took the form of a boar for the purpose of raising the earth out of the boundless waters.” — p. 34
Creation is shown as a sport, an amusement (Lîlâ) of the creative god.
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The creation of the world is very commonly considered to be the Līlā . . . sport or amusement, of the supreme being.” — 1:20 fn.
The Zohar speaks of primordial worlds, which perished as soon as they came into existence.
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “The Zohar says, ‘There were old worlds, which perished as soon as they came into existence: were formless, as they were called sparks. . . . These sparks are the primordial worlds which could not continue, because the Sacred Aged had not as yet assumed his form . . .’ ” — p. 408 (Idra Suta, iii. 292b)

— Footnotes

(See Book I. “The Seven Creations”)
see: “The Seven Creations,” SD 1:445-60.

— 53-4 —

“the Holy One” had successively created and destroyed sundry worlds . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Rabbi Abahu in the Bereshith Rabba, Parsha ix., expressly says, ‘From this we see that the Holy One . . . had successively created and destroyed sundry worlds before He created the present world . . .’ ” — p. 408

— 54 —

For the words, “This one pleases me,” are repeated in Genesis i. 31
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “ ‘[The Holy One] said, This pleases me; the previous ones did not please me’ — alluding in this place to Gen. i. 31.” — p. 408
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good.” — p. 2 (Genesis, 1:31)
our actual creation was preceded by others
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “The Babylonian Genesis . . . is essentially local in character; but the local elements have been combined . . . to form that great epic of the Creation whose fragments have come to us from the library of Nineveh. . . . in each case the present creation has been preceded by another.” — p. 390
and as shown by the author of “The Qabbalah” . . . The Kabala [La Kabbale] states the same.
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “In the Qabbalah reference is made to the seven androgenic kings who were first made, who were imperfect and were destroyed {Zohar: Siphrah D’Tznioothah, beg. Idrah Rabbah, 128a, 135b.  Idrah Zootah, 292bLa Kabbale [by Adolphe Franck], p. 205 sq.}.” — p. 246 & fn.
the abyss of waters . . . wherein resided most hideous beings . . .
p/q: Ancient Fragments, comp. Isaac Preston Cory, 1832: “There was a time in which there existed nothing but darkness and an abyss of waters, wherein resided most hideous beings . . . There appeared men, some of whom were furnished with two wings, others with four, and with two faces.  They had one body but two heads . . . Other human figures were to be seen with the legs and horns of goats: some . . . resembling in shape the hippocentaurs.  Bulls likewise were bred there with the heads of men; and dogs . . . with the tails of fishes . . .” — pp. 23-4 (Berosus, “Of the Cosmogony and Deluge”)
 combinations of various animals and men . . . assuming each other’s shapes . . .
p/q: Ancient Fragments, comp. Isaac Preston Cory, 1832: “In short, there were creatures in which were combined the limbs of every species of animals.  In addition to these, fishes, reptiles, serpents, with other monstrous animals, which assumed each other’s shape and countenance.” — p. 24 (Berosus, “Of the Cosmogony and Deluge”)
The feminine element . . . is personified by Thalatth — the Sea
see: Ancient Fragments, comp. Isaac Preston Cory, 1832: “The person, who presided over them, was a woman named Omoroca; which in the Chaldæan language is Thalatth; in Greek Thalassa, the sea . . .” — p. 25 (Berosus, “Of the Cosmogony and Deluge”)
Polyhistor says: “Belus came and cut the woman asunder . . .”
p/q: Ancient Fragments, comp. Isaac Preston Cory, 1832: “. . . Belus came, and cut the woman asunder: and of one half of her he formed the earth, and of the other half the heavens; and at the same time destroyed the animals within her. . . . (Such, according to Polyhistor Alexander, is the account which Berossus gives in his first book.)” — pp. 25-6 (“Of the Cosmogony and Deluge”)
“with the Akkadians each object and power of Nature had its Zi, Spirit. . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “With the Akkadians each object and power of nature had its Zi or spirit.  The Akkadians formed their deities into triads, usually of males, the Semites also had triadic deities but introduced sex.” — p. 246

— Footnotes

According to the commentator Kwoh P’oh in the work called Shan-Hai-King . . .
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “The Shan Hai King — According to the commentator Kwoh P’oh (a.d. 276-324), this work was compiled three thousand years before this time, or at seven dynasties’ distance.  Yang Sun of the Ming dynasty (commencing a.d. 1368), states that it was compiled by Kung Chia (and Chung Ku?) from engravings on nine urns made by the Emperor Yü, b.c. 2255.” — p. 27
an interview is mentioned with men having two distinct faces on their heads . . .
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Wang Ch’i had an interview with men having two distinct faces on their heads . . .” — p. 386 (Appendix III, Preface to “Wonders by Land and Sea”)
Chung Ku at the time of the last emperor of the Hia dynasty . . .
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Chung Ku was an historiographer, and at the time of the last Emperor of the Hia dynasty (b.c. 1888), fearing that the Emperor might destroy the books treating of the ancient and present time, carried them in flight to Yin.” — p. 27

— 55 —

“the Lord of Angels” destroys the men in the abyss . . .
p/q: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “. . . lord of the upper region and the lower region lord of angels . . . with his flame, his weapon, that men he enclosed . . . he destroyed . . . and there were not left the carcasses and waste . . .” — p. 102 (“Legend of Creation from Cutha tablet”)
After which they . . . create men with the bodies of birds of the desert . . .
p/q: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “Men with the bodies of birds of the desert, human beings . . . Seven kings brothers of the same family . . .” — p. 103 (“Legend of Creation from Cutha tablet”)
who “were destroyed” because they were not “perfect” . . .
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “. . . the Perfect Primordial Ideation Man or Adam, comprises . . . All Things . . . And because that constitution of (the Perfect Man) Adam was not at that early time found, they (the Primitive Kings of Edom . . .) could not exist . . . until the complete formation of Adam came forward. . . . {the Perfect Ideation Adam, who was at first an Androgene, but who had been separated into the two sexes}.” — p. 138 & fn.
lizards with birds’ wings, and serpents’ heads on animal bodies
see: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Are the composite creatures of Chaldæan mythology so very much more wonderful than . . . the flying lizard of Malaysia . . . Does not geological science . . . disclose the previous existence of intermediate types . . . connecting the great divisions of the animal kingdom, of reptile-like birds and bird-like reptiles?” — pp. 18-19

— Footnotes

“The three Ribhus” who yet become “thrice seven in number” of their gifts
see: Ṛig-Veda-Sanhitā, Book 2, tr. H. H. Wilson, 1850: “The Ṛibhus have divided into four the new ladle . . . May they, moved by our praises, give to the offerer of the libation many precious things, and perfect the thrice seven sacrifices.” — p. 48 (xx.6-7)
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ṚIBHUS.  Three sons of Su-dhanwan . . . Through their assiduous performance of good works they obtained divinity . . . They are supposed to dwell in the solar sphere . . . [as] rays of the sun . . . By command of the gods . . . they made a single new sacrificial cup into four.” — p. 267
Remember the “winged Races” of Plato
see: Plato, Works, v. 1, tr. Henry Cary, 1848: “The rest follow, all eager for the upper region, but being unable to reach it they are . . . striking against each other . . . and many break many of their feathers . . . it is the nature of the wing by which the soul is borne aloft . . . but whenever from inability to keep up . . . filled with oblivion and vice, and so weighed down, and from being weighed down has lost its wings, and fallen to the earth . . .” — p. 324 (Phædrus, 59-60)
and the Popol-Vuh accounts of the first human race . . .
see: Max Müller, Chips from a German Workshop, 1867-75: “Four men are mentioned as the real ancestors of the human race . . . their creation was a wonder wrought by the Creator.  They could reason and speak, their sight was unlimited, and they knew all things at once.” — 1:336-7 (“Extracts from the ‘Popol Vuh’ ”)

— 56 —

monsters . . . were a possibility . . . by the bare fact of “Reversion
see: Charles Darwin, On the Origin of Species, 1864: “So again characters which formerly were useful . . . may reappear from the law of reversion, though now of no direct use.” — p. 178

— Footnotes

In the first volume . . . by M. de Quatrefages . . . Races were already scattered . . .
see: “Societies and Academies,” Nature, Nov. 4, 1886: “Note accompanying the presentation of his work entitled ‘An Introduction to the Study of the Human Races,’ by M. de Quatrefages.  This is the first volume of the ‘Bibliothèque d’Ethnologie’ . . . he now shows that even in Quaternary times the human race had already spread over the whole earth . . . This ubiquity of Quaternary man already suggested the existence of the species in the previous epoch, and direct proofs of this fact have recently been multiplied . . .” — p. 23
since the post-tertiary period . . . man has not altered one iota in his physical structure
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “. . . an unknown cause began to accelerate the development of the intelligence in this anthropoid being. . . . The physical characters already acquired remained almost unaltered . . . Animals unaffected by this unknown cause which separates us from them, continued to undergo morphological transmutations, so that since the Miocene epoch there has been a great change in the terrestrial fauna.  With man only did the form remain the same.” — p. 117
Why should he alone have escaped transformation? . . .
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “The superiority acquired by the intelligence has, moreover, removed our race for ever from the law of the action of morphological transmutations.” — p. 117
the human organism . . . existed already . . . in those far distant geological periods . . .
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “Thus, man was most certainly in existence during the quaternary epoch . . . He has . . . seen miocene times, and consequently the entire pliocene epoch. . . . He may then have been contemporaneous with the earliest mammalia, and go back as far as the secondary period.”  “. . . he has been contemporary with species of mammalia which have not even seen the commencement of the present epoch.  There is then nothing impossible in the idea that he should have survived other species . . . or have appeared upon the globe with the first representatives of the type to which he belongs by his organisation.” — pp. 152, 153

— 57 —

— Footnotes

In the esoteric system the seven principles in man are represented by seven letters.
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “Seven are the paths (if the Tetragrammaton be written in this way partially complete), IVD, HH, V, H . . . for occultly Adam is denoted . . .” — p. 95 (Book of Concealed Mystery, V.2)
The first two are more sacred than the four letters of the Tetragrammaton.
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “The number 2, or the Duad. . . . This Sephira is the active and evident Father [2nd Sephira], to whom the Mother is united, who is the number 3.” — p. 24
      “. . . IHVH, the Tetragrammaton . . . signifies the Lesser Countenance, Microprosopus . . .” — pp. 31-2
      “The first two letters, I and H, Yod and He, are the father and mother of Microprosopus . . .” — p. 41
The “Three Fires,” Pavaka, Pavamâna, and Suchi
see: The Upanishads, Part II, tr. Max Müller, 1884: “The earth is the Gārhapatya-fire, the sky the Dakshiṇa-fire, the heaven the Āhavanīya-fire; and therefore they are also the Pavamāna (pure), the Pāvaka (purifying), and the Śuchi (bright).” — p. 332 (Maitrāyana-Brāhmaṇa-Upanishad, vi.34)
see: Selections from the Mahābhārata, ed. Francis Johnson, 1842: “The sacred fire of the Hindus, which was originally one, is said to have been made threefold by Purūravas. . . . 1st, Gārhapatya, perpetual household fire . . . is to be always burning . . . It is the pure Vestal flame, the emblem of Eternal light . . .” — p. 14 fn.
Pavaka, Pavamâna, and Suchi, who had forty-five sons . . . 49 fires
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Pāvaka, Pavamāna, and Śuchi . . . They had forty-five sons, who, with the original son of Brahmā, and his three descendants, constitute the forty-nine fires.” — 1:156 (i.10)
Pavamâna (fire produced by friction) is the parent of the fire of the Asuras
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Pavamāna was the parent of Kavyavāhana, the fire of the Pitṛis . . . [and] of Saharaksha, the fire of the Asuras.” — 1:156 fn.
Suchi (Solar fire) is the parent of the fire of the gods . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Śuchi is solar (Saura) fire . . . [parent] of Havyavāhana, the fire of the gods . . .” — 1:156 fn.
and Pavaka (electric fire) is the father of the fire of the Pitris (See Vayu Purana)
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The Vāyu Purāṇa enters into a very long detail of the names and places of the whole forty-nine fires.  According to that, also, Pāvaka is electric or Vaidyuta fire . . .” — 1:156 fn.
      “P. 156, notes . . . Pāvaka, I think, is called parent of Kavyavāhana.” — 5(I):387 (Corrigenda)
The Suras, who became later the A-Suras.
see: W. J. Wilkins, Hindu Mythology, 1882: “In the Purānas and other of the later writings . . . the Suras were the gods, the A-suras were not-gods, and therefore the enemies or opponents of the gods.  In the Vedas the name Asura is applied more frequently to the gods themselves . . . ‘Varuna was the all-knowing Asura, Prajāpati, the Supreme Being; Indra, the Maruts, Tvastri, Mitra, Rudra . . . Vāyu . . . were all Asuras.’ ” — p. 364

— 58 —

Brahmâ . . . “Possessed of the desire and of the power to create . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . in the beginning of each Kalpa, does Brahmā repeatedly create the world, possessing the power that is derived from the will to create . . . {‘Possessed of the desire and of the power to create, and impelled by the potencies of what is to be created, again and again does he, at the outset of a Kalpa, put forth a similar creation.’}.” — 1:87-8 & fn. (i.5)
(see Vishnu Purâna . . . Also “Manava Dharma Shastra,” I. 30.)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The writer may have had in mind a stanza of the Mānava-dharma-śastra: I., 30.” — 1:88 fn.
Brahmâ assuming . . . “four bodies invested by three qualities
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā then, being desirous of creating the four orders of beings . . . collected his mind into itself.  Whilst thus concentrated, the quality of darkness pervaded his body; and thence the demons (the Asuras) were first born . . . Continuing to create, but assuming a different shape . . . from his mouth proceeded the gods, endowed with the quality of goodness. . . . He next adopted another person, in which the rudiment of goodness also prevailed; and . . . the progenitors (the Pitṛis) were born from his side. . . . Brahmā then assumed another person, pervaded by the quality of foulness; and from this, men . . . were produced . . .[these] are the four bodies of Brahmā invested by three qualities.” — 1:79-81 (i.5)
when Brahmâ wants to create . . . “he collects Yoga-like (Yúyujè) his mind”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā . . . desirous of creating the four orders of beings, termed gods, demons, progenitors, and men, collected his mind into itself {‘Collecting his mind into itself’ . . . is the performance of the Yoga (Yūyuje)}.” — 1:79-80 & fn. (i.5)
Mahat, or Intellect . . . the “first product” of Pradhana
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Then from that equilibrium of the qualities (Pradhāna), presided over by soul, proceeds the unequal development of those qualities (constituting the principle Mahat or Intellect) at the time of creation {The first product of Pradhāna . . . the principle called Mahat, literally, ‘the Great’}.” — 1:29 & fn.

— 59 —

“Having concentrated his mind into itself and the quality of darkness pervading . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā . . . collected his mind into itself.  Whilst thus concentrated, the quality of darkness prevaded his body and thence the demons (Asuras) were first born, issuing from his thigh.  Brahmā then abandoned that form which was composed of the rudiment of darkness, and which, being deserted by him, became night.” — 1:79-80 (i.5)
(See Part II., § “The Fallen Angels.”)
see: “On the Myth of the ‘Fallen Angel,’ in its Various Aspects,” SD 2:475-505.
in the Rig-Veda, the “Asuras” are shown as Spiritual divine beings . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ASURA.  ‘Spiritual, divine.’  In the oldest parts of the Ṛig-veda this term is used for the supreme spirit, and is the same as the Ahura of the Zoroastrians. . . . According to the Taittirīya Brāhmana, the breath (asu) of Prajāpati became alive, and ‘with that breath he created the Asuras.’ ” — p. 27
later on . . . their name began to be derived from a privative, and sura, god
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “It afterwards acquired an entirely opposite meaning, and came to signify, as now, a demon or enemy of the gods. . . . In this sense a different derivation has been found for it . . . the initial a is taken as the negative prefix, and a-sura signifies ‘not a god’ . . .” — pp. 27-8
Continuing to create, Brahmâ assumes another form . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Continuing to create, but assuming a different shape . . . from his mouth proceeded the gods, endowed with the quality of goodness.  The form abandoned by him became day . . .” — 1:80 (i.5)
“Brahmâ thought of himself . . . as the father of the world.”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “He next adopted another person . . . and, thinking of himself as the father of the world, the progenitors (the Pitṛis) were born from his side.” — 1:80-1 (i.5)

— Footnotes

“by day the gods are most powerful . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . and hence by day the gods are most powerful, and by night the demons.” — 1:80 (i.5)
“whosoever shall say to this mountain be thou removed . . .”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . Whosoever shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea; and shall not doubt in his heart, but shall believe that those things which he saith shall come to pass; he shall have whatsoever he saith.” — p. 63 (Mark, 11:23)

— 60 —

This body of Brahmâ when cast off became the Sandhya . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The body, when he [Brahmā] abandoned it, became the Sandhyā (or evening twilight), the interval between day and night.” — 1:81 (i.5)
Brahmâ assumed his last form . . . “and from this men were produced.”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā then assumed another person, pervaded by the quality of foulness; and from this, men, in whom foulness (or passion) predominates, were produced.” — 1:81 (i.5)
This body when cast off became the dawn, or morning twilight
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Quickly abandoning that body, it became morning twilight, or the dawn.” — 1:81 (i.5)

— Footnotes

The same idea [of collective creators] is found in . . . Genesis, with their “Lord” and “God”
see: Henry Pratt, New Aspects of Life and Religion, 1886: “The Hebrew designation of the Creator, Elohim, in the first chapter of Genesis . . . means ‘forces.’ ” — p. 42
      “In reading the Pentateuch, it is noticeable that God is first called Elohim, then Jehovah Elohim, and then Jehovah.  Of these, Elohim is in the plural, and really signifies gods.” — p. 63
      “. . . how are we to know that Jehovah was not a personating spirit . . . of the One unknown and unknowable God? . . . and it is on the faith of the assertion of this personator that the names El, Eloah, Elohim and Shaddai, have been read and interpreted . . . as ‘the Lord God Almighty’ . . .” — p. 145
which are the Elohim and the Androgynous Eloha
see: Christian D. Ginsburg, The Kabbalah, 1865: “From the junction of the foregoing opposites emanated again the masculine or active potency . . . represented by El ( אל ) . . . From this again emanated the feminine or passive potency . . . represented by the divine name Eloha ( אלה ) . . . and from this again the uniting potency . . . represented by the divine name Elohim ( אלהים ) . . .” — p. 9
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “Elohim is a compound made up of El, a masculine singular, meaning the all-embracing God; to this ה, or h, is added . . . constituting El-h [’Elōha, Elōah], or male and female.” — p. 180

— 61 —

The Sadducees . . . knew not of, and rejected, any angels
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “For the Sadducees say that there is no resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit . . .” — p. 191 (Acts, 23:8)
opposing even the immortality of the human Soul
see: Hiram Mattison, The Immortality of the Soul, 1866: “The Sadducees denied the immortality of the soul, if not all purely spiritual existence.” — p. 56
the only “Angels” spoken of are the “Sons of God” mentioned in Genesis vi.
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “The Nephilim were in the earth in those days, and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them . . .” — p. 7 (Genesis, 6:4)
(who are now regarded as the Nephilim, the Fallen Angels)
see: John Fleming, The Fallen Angels, 1879: “. . . the historian observes . . . that ‘the Nephilim’ were then in the earth — thus designing to inform his readers . . . that the Sons of God, of whom he had spoken, were no others than those known as the Nephilim — this being the established and recognized designation of certain angels, who left their heavenly habitation, for the purpose of companying with women.” — p. 102
Ea, Wisdom, that which was disfigured . . . into Tismat, Tisalat and Thallath of Berosus
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “Hea [Ea], maker of fate, lord of the deep, god of wisdom and knowledge . . .” — p. 53
      “. . . in the Creation tablet the first existence is called Mummu Tiamatu, a name meaning the ‘sea-water’ or ‘sea chaos.’ . . . Tiamatu appears also as Tisallat and agrees with the Thalatth of Berosus . . . [and] with the statement of Genesis, i. 2. where the chaotic waters are called . . . ‘the deep,’ the same word as the Tiamat of the Creation text . . .” — pp. 64-5
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “In the later or Semitic period . . . Tiamat [is] considered as the evil dragon of darkness . . . but with the early Akkadian philosophers of Eridu, there was not anything unholy in the watery abyss, the home and mother of Ea or Wisdom . . . But in the Semitic account, the abyss is the chaotic opposition to the present order of nature and is evil.” — pp. 244-5
“How art thou fallen . . . O bright star and son of the morning”!
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “How art thou fallen from heaven, O day star [Lucifer], son of the morning!” — p. 894 (Isaiah, 14:12)
 Smith’s “Assyrian Discoveries” . . . The “Tablet with the story of the Seven Wicked Gods or Spirits
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “There is another legend . . . the legend of the seven evil spirits, which I have given in my former work, ‘Assyrian Discoveries,’ p. 398.
      Tablet with the story of the Seven Wicked Gods or Spirits [translation follows].” — p. 107
1. In the first days the Evil Gods . . .
p/q: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876:
“1. In the first days the evil gods
  2. the angels who were in rebellion, who in the lower part of heaven
  3. had been created,
  4. they caused their evil work
  5. devising with wicked heads . . .” — p. 107

— 62 —

7. There were seven of them (. . . the fourth being a ‘serpent’ . . .)
p/q: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “7. There were seven of them. . . . 11. the fourth was a serpent . . .” — p. 108
15. The seven of them . . .
p/q: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “15. The seven of them messengers of the god Anu their king.” — p. 108
the “Messengers of Anu” . . . overpowered by the same Sin . . .
see: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “At this time Bel of this matter head and . . . Sin (the moon), Shamas (the sun), and Ishtar (Venus) in the lower part of heaven to control it he appointed. . . . In those days those seven evil spirits . . . before the light of Sin fiercely they came . . . Shamas and Vul (the god of the atmosphere) the warrior to their side they turned . . . Ishtar with Anu the king into a noble seat . . . they raised and in the government of heaven they fixed.” — p. 109 (§§ 28-41)
It is Michael, “who is like unto God” . . . leader of the celestial hosts . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Michael (Hebrew . . . Who is like unto God?) — The protecting angel of Israel (Dan. x. 13), and leader of the celestial hosts, as Lucifer is of the infernal hosts.” — p. 485

— 63 —

As shown by Bentley, the “War of the Titans against the gods” in Hesiod . . .
see: John Bentley, Historical View of the Hindu Astronomy, 1825: “The War between the Gods and the Giants in the West, described by Hesiod in his Theogony . . . appears to have been derived from the Hindus . . .” — p. 36
“all the planets, except Saturn, were on the same side of the heavens . . .”
p/q: John Bentley, Historical View of the Hindu Astronomy, 1825: “. . . we find that the eclipse we are in quest of fell on Thursday, the 25th October, in the year 945 B.C. . . . From which it will appear, that all the planets, except Saturn, were on the same side of the heavens with the sun and moon.” — p. 28
the “burning” fiery Saraph (Seraphim) mentioned by Isaiah (vi. 2-6) . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Seraphim . . . The plural of the word . . . saraph, ‘burning or fiery,’ and applied to celestial beings, described by Isaiah vi. 2-6.  They were supposed to be in attendanace at the Throne of the Almighty . . .” — p. 662
Melha is the Lord of the “Flames”
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “. . . Melha, or Melhai gyalpo, ‘the lord of the genii of fire’ . . .” — p. 251
when he appears on Earth, he assumes the personality of a Buddha
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “Melha, the God of fire . . . in representations not having for object to show his wrath, his attitude and type are those of a Buddha.” — pp. 207-8
the Llas are Spirits of the highest Spheres
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “The highest class are the Lha, ‘spirits, highest beings, gods,’ Sanskr. Deva; they rank next to the Buddhas, and inhabit the six celestial regions (Sanskr. Devalōkas).” — p. 91
whence the name of the capital of Tibet, Lha-ssa
see: Abbé Huc, Travels in Tartary, Thibet and China, 1852: “. . . a Lha (spirit), all radiant with light, stayed him . . . Tsong-Kaba, docile to the supernatural voice, entered the Land of Spirits (Lha-Ssa) . . .” — 2:48

— 64 —

not less than 52,000,000 years ago — and probably much more — the Moon originated . . .
p/q: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “. . . Mr. [G. H.] Darwin . . . is led therefore to assume . . . that the moon actually did separate from the earth after the earth had attained the condition of a molten or plastic mass. . . . The epoch was not less than fifty-two million years ago — probably much more.” — p. 259
he retraced the course of tidal retardation of the earth’s rotary motion . . .
p/q: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “Proceeding from the starting point already determined by the researches of Ferrel (1853), Helmholtz, Purser, Sir William Thomson and Delaunay, Mr. [G. H.] Darwin has attempted to retrace the course of tidal retardation of the earth’s rotary motion through the long æons of the past.” — pp. 258-9
and placed the Moon . . . at only “a fraction of its present distance”
p/q: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “. . . it follows that at some epoch in the past the moon’s distance was but a fraction of its present distance . . .” — p. 259
The tidal elevation concurring with the swing of the globular mass . . .
p/q: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “The tidal elevation would concur with the natural swing of the earth-mass; and, at a time when the centrifugal tendency was nearly equal to gravity, the concurrence of the tidal and oscillatory movements might quite overcome gravitation, and the tidally elevated mass might completely separate from the earth.” — p. 260

— Footnotes

Compare Sir R. S. Bull’s article in “Nature” . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “. . . Professor Robert S. Ball, {In a lecture . . . published in Nature, xxv, 79-82, 103-7, Nov. 24 and Dec. 1, 1881} of Dublin, has lately advanced the opinion that enormous lunar tides were produced upon earth during the Palæozoic ages.” — p. 263 & fn.

— 65 —

Varuna is dragged down from the infinite Space, to reign as Neptune over the finite Seas.
see: A. A. Macdonell, Vedic Mythology, 1897: “It is in the highest heaven that the Fathers behold Varuṇa [the all-envoloping sky].”  “In the AV. Varuṇa appears divested of his powers as a universal ruler, retaining only the control of the department of waters.”  “Thus he ultimately became in post-Vedic mythology an Indian Neptune, god of the Sea.” — pp. 23, 25-6, 28
We are taught by the Greeks (See “Iliad” IV., 201, 246) . . .
see: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Les plus anciens indices qui nous restent de ces premières conceptions se trouvent dans deux passages de l’Iliade {IV, 201; 246} [The oldest indications that are left to us of these first ideas are to be found in two passages of the Iliad {IV. 201, 246}.” — pp. 2-3 & fn.
that all things, gods included, owe their being to the Ocean and his wife Tethys
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Il y est dit que toutes les choses et tous les dieux doivent leur naissance à Océan et qu’Océan a pour épouse Téthys [There it is said that all things and all the gods owe their birth to Oceanus and that Tethys is Oceanus’ wife].” — p. 3

— Footnotes

The goddess . . . in the account of Berosus, was Thallath, in Greek Thalassa, “the Sea.”
p/q: Ancient Fragments, comp. Isaac Preston Cory, 1832: “ ‘There was a time in which there existed nothing but darkness and an abyss of waters, wherein resided most hideous beings, which were produced of a two-fold principle. . . . The person, who presided over them, was a women named Omoroca; which in the Chaldean language is Thalatth; in Greek Thalassa, the sea . . .’ ” — pp. 23-4, 25 (Berosus, “Of the Cosmogony and Deluge”)
Neras . . . and Kimnaras . . . created by Brahmâ in the commencement of the Kalpa
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The great progenitor of the world, having formed . . . in the commencement of the Kalpa . . . Naras (centaurs, or beings with the limbs of horses and human bodies), and Kiṃnaras (beings {‘men’} with the heads of horses) . . .” — 1:86-7 & fn. (i.5)

— 66 —

 for chronological information, one is told by . . . Pengelly . . . “We do not know.”
see: W. Pengelly, “On the Devonian Age of the World,” Aug. 1861: “The rocks composing the earth’s crust contain . . . a history of changes . . . The time required for these mutations must have been vast beyond human comprehension . . . In the existing state of our knowledge it is impossible to convert geological into astronomical time . . .” — p. 332 (The Geologist)

— Footnotes

For a similar admission see Prof. Lefèvre’s Philosophy, p. 481.
see: André Lefèvre, Philosophy, 1879: “All estimate of geological duration is not merely impossible but necessarily imperfect; for we are ignorant of the causes, though they must have existed, which may have quickened or retarded the progress of sedimentary deposits. . . . And what is even the duration of the organic evolution itself compared with the eons that preceded it . . .” — pp. 480-1

— 67 —

the farthest date . . . “the earliest distinctly visible point . . .”
p/q: E. B. Tylor, “Anthropology,” 1878: “. . . the farthest date to which documentary record extends, is now generally regarded by anthropologists as but the earliest distinctly visible point of the historic period, beyond which stretches back a vast indefinite series of prehistoric ages.” — p. 117 (Encyclopædia Britannica, v. 2)
the already mentioned Tamil calendar called the “Tirukkanda Panchanga”
see: R. S. Perinbanayagam, The Karmic Theater, 1982: “. . . there are two systems of time: civil time . . . and religious time, based on the ancient Hindu and Tamil systems of astronomy and astrology. . . . The information in these Pancānkams is used to order the activities of everyday life.  One of the Pancānkams is known as the Vākiya Pancānkam, the other is known as the Tirukkanita Pancānkam . . . The Vākiya Pancānkam has retained the original tables . . . whereas the Tirukkanita Pancānkam has introduced various corrections.” — p. 46
the “White Island, which had become Black with sin”
see: Sampson Arnold Mackey, Mythological Astronomy, 1822-3: “The White Island has disappeared . . . ‘The Indians believe the White Island became black on account of the sins of the people!’ ” — p. 71 (Key of Urania)
see: Capt. F. Wilford, “An Essay on the Sacred Isles in the West,” 1808: “The Sacred Isles in the West, of which Sweta-dwīpa, or the White Island, is the principal, and the most famous, are, in fact, the holy land of the Hindus.”  “. . . in the present wicked age and degenerated times . . . the white island, is become black, on account of the sins of mankind.” — pp. 246, 302 (Asiatic Researches, v. 8)
Asuramâya is said to have lived . . . in Romaka-pura in the West
see: Albrecht Weber, History of Indian Literature, 1882: “The epic tradition, again, gives as the earliest astronomer the Asura Maya . . . by the later tradition (that of Jnāna-bhāskara, for instance) this Maya is distinctly assigned to Romaka-pura in the West.” — p. 253
the Wise Race, the Race that never dies
see: Bishop Thomas Burnett, The Sacred Theory of the Earth, 1816: “And in the west, the Celts, the most ancient people there, had the same tradition; for the Druids, who were their priests and philosophers, derived not from the Greeks, but of the old race of wise men, that had their learning traditionally, and, as it were, hereditary from the first ages: these, as Strabo tells us, lib. 4. gave the world a kind of immortality by repeated renovations . . .” — p. 389
Asuramâya . . . the pupil of Surya (the Sun-God) himself
see: Albrecht Weber, History of Indian Literature, 1882: “The epic tradition, again, gives . . . Asura Maya, and asserts that to him the sun-god himself imparted the knowledge of the stars.” — p. 253

— 68 —

Romakúpas” means “hair-pores” . . . Raumyas . . . created from the pores of Virabhadra
p/q: Albrecht Weber, History of Indian Literature, 1882: “. . . in Mahā-Bhārata xii. 10308, the Raumyas are said to have been created from the roma-kūpas (‘hair-pores’) of Vīrabhadra, at the destruction of Daksha’s sacrifice . . .” — p. 253 fn.
From the beginning of cosmic evolution . . . 1,955,884,687 years.
see: Hans Malmstedt, “Our Position in Time on Globe D,” Oct. 1933: “. . . compare the following three numbers of years given on that page [SD 2:68] . . . the two first of them taken from the Tamil calendar and the third one from Sarasvatī [68 fn.]:
1,955,844,687 years
1,664,500,987     ''
1,960,852,987     ''
And further, let us look at the three last figures in these three numbers of years:
                 687
                 987
                 987
. . . They should all be the same, or 987 . . . It is possible, however, that a compositor . . . turned the 9 upside down and made a 6.” — p. 229 (The Theosophical Path, v. 43)

— Footnotes

Dayanand Saraswati, founder of the Arya Samaj, gives a date of 1,960,852,987.
see: The Religious History of India, comp. John Murdoch, 1900: “Dayānand held the eternity of the Vedas.  An Arya Samaj tract, Beliefs of Dayānand Sarasvatī, bears the date, 1,960,852,987 a.m. with the Christian era 1887 a.d.” — p. 159

— 69 —

The full period of one Manvantara . . . 14 “Manvantaras” plus the period of one Sâtya Yuga . . .
see: John Bentley, “Remarks on the Principal Æras and Dates of the Ancient Hindus,” 1799: “The Calpa is the greatest of all the astronomical periods, and the duration of it is 4320000000 years.  This period is composed, or made up, of the lesser yugs, &c. in the following manner.  4 Yugs, viz. a Satya, a Treta, a Dwapar, and a Cali yug, make one divine age or Maha yug; 71 Maha yugs, with a Sandhi [transition period], equal to a Satya yug, make 1 Manwantara; and 14 Manwantaras compose a Calpa . . .The duration of each . . . Manwanatara  –  308448000 [years] . . .” — p. 316 (Asiatic Researches, v. 5)
Therefore a Maha-Yuga consists of . . . 4,320,000 years.
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “If these divine years are converted into years of mortals, by multiplying them by 360 (a year of men being a day of the gods), we obtain the years of which the Yugas of mortals are respectively said to consist:
4800 x 360 =  1.728.000   [Kṛita Yuga]  
3600 x 360 =  1.296.000   [Tretā Yuga]  
2400 x 360 = 864.000   [Dwāpara Yuga]  
1200 x 360 = 432.000   [Kali Yuga]  
  4.320.000,  a Mahāyuga.” — 1:50 fn.

— Footnotes

Vaivasvata Manu
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “MANU. . . . This name belongs to fourteen mythological progenitors of mankind . . . each of whom holds sway for the period called a Manwantara . . . The Manu of the present age is the seventh, named Vaivaswata, ‘sun-born,’ who was the son of Vivaswat, the sun . . .” — p. 199
who in the Matsya Avatar allegory . . . is saved from the Deluge in a boat
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The earliest mention of the fish [Matsya] Avatāra occurs in the Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa . . . Manu found . . . a small fish, which spoke to him and said, ‘I will save thee’ from a flood which shall sweep away all creatures.  This fish grew to a large size, and had to be consigned to the ocean, when he directed Manu to construct a ship and resort to him when the flood should rise.” — p. 35
      “[In the] story, as told in the Mahā-bhārata . . . it warned Manu of the coming flood, and directed him to build a ship and to embark with the seven Ṛishis. . . .
‘And now, when all the world was deluged, nought appeared above the waves
But Manu and the seven sages, and the fish that drew the bark.
   . . . ‘Know me, the lord of all,
The great creator Brahmā, mightier than all might, omnipotent.
By me, in fish-like shape, have you been saved . . .’ ” — pp. 200-1
the “Naimitika,” occasional or incidental, “Prakritika,” elemental, “Atyantika,” the absolute . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The dissolution of all things is of four kinds: Naimittika, ‘occasional’; Prākṛitika, ‘elemental’; Ātyantika, ‘absolute’; Nitya, ‘perpetual’.” — 1:112-13 (i.7)
the latter being described as “Brahmâ’s contingent recoalescence . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “At the end of this day, a dissolution of the universe occurs {‘At the end of this day occurs a recoalescence of the universe, called Brahmā’s contingent recoalescence’} . . .” — 1:52 & fn. (i.3)
“. . . otherwise, the Logos (Krishna) would have to be reborn . . .”
p/q: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — III,” April 1887: “But even though there may be a cosmic pralaya the Logos will not perish even when it takes place; otherwise at the recommencement of cosmic activity, the Logos will have to be born again . . . In such a case, Krishna cannot call himself aja (unborn); he can only say this of himself, if the Logos does not perish . . .” — p. 443 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
the Avyaya . . . the eternal . . . assuming the character of Rudra, the Destroyer . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The eternal {Avyaya} Vishṇu then assumes the character of Rudra, the destroyer . . . [he] enters into the seven rays of the sun, drinks up all the waters of the globe . . . Thus fed . . . the seven solar rays dilate to seven suns, whose radiance glows above, below, and on every side, and sets the three worlds and Pātāla on fire.” — 5(I):191-2 & fn.

— 69-70 —

360 days of mortals make a year . . .
p/q: Mabel Collins & P. Sreenevas Row, “Light on the Path — III,” Nov. 1885:
“ Mortal years.  
 
360 days of mortals make a year
1
 
Krita Yuga contains
1,728,000
 
Treta Yuga contains
1,296,000
 
Dwapara Yuga contains
864,000
 
Kali Yuga contains
432,000
 
The total of the said four Yugas constitute a
Maha Yuga
4,320,000
 
Seventy-one of such Maha Yugas form the
period of the reign of one Manu
306,720,000
 
The reign of 14 Manus embraces the duration
of 994 Maha Yugas, which is equal to
4,294,080,000
 
Add Sandhis, i.e., intervals between the reign
of each Manu, which amount to 6 Maha Yugas,
equal to
25,920,000
 
The total of these reigns and interregnums of
14 Manus, is 1,000 Maha Yugas, which consti-
tute a Kalpa, i.e., one day of Brahma, — equal to
4,320,000,000
 
As Brahma’s night is of equal duration, one
day and night of Brahma will contain
8,640,000,000
 
360 of such days and nights make one year of
Brahma, equal to
3,110,400,000,000
 
100 of such years constitute the whole period
of Brahma’s age i.e., Maha Kalpa
311,040,000,000,000
  ”
                                    — pp. 115-16 (The Theosophist, v. 7)

— 70 —

(the Gibborim of the Bible)
see: John Fleming, Fallen Angels, 1879: “Dr. Delitzsch . . . gives the following as his translation of the verse [Genesis, 6:4] . . . ‘The giants were . . . on the earth in those days . . . and also, after that . . . when the Sons of God joined themselves to the daughters of men, and they bare children to them (giants arose likewise) . . .’ . . . [Delitzsch] discovers in the Gibborim, a later race of giants, less gigantic then the first.” — pp. 104-5
the Orphic Titan, the anguipedal monster known as Ephialtes
see: Victor Duruy, History of Greece, 1898: “The ancient Greeks had an instinctive knowledge of these great convulsions of Nature.  These . . . recalled to their minds the strife of the Titans against Zeus . . .
Titans
{Two anguipede [serpent-footed] Titans, each holding a rock and clasping hands, about to attack Zeus}.” — 1:127 & fn.
see: M. A. Dwight, Grecian and Roman Mythology, 1849: “The Aloeids, Otos and Ephialtes, were also sons of Poseidon.  In their ninth year, they were nine cubits in width, and nine fathoms in height.  At this early age they undertook to make war upon Zeus . . .” — p. 412
the Rakshasas and Yakshas of Lanka
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “RĀKSHASAS. . . . have been classified as of three sorts — one as a set of beings like Yakshas [elemental spirits], another as a sort of Titans or enemies of the gods, and lastly, in the common acceptation of the term, demons and fiends who haunt cemetaries . . . and vex and afflict mankind in all sorts of ways. . . . When Hanumān entered the city of Lankā . . . he saw that ‘the Rākshasas sleeping in the houses were of every shape and form.’ (Rāmāyana).” — pp. 254-5

— 70-1 —

the antiquity of man is allowed to stretch only over “tens of thousands of years”
p/q: E. B. Tylor, “Anthropology,” 1878: “This evidence is now generally accepted by geologists as carrying back the existence of man into the period of the post-glacial drift . . . this indicates an antiquity at least of tens of thousands of years . . .” — p. 115 (Encyclopædia Britannica, v. 2)

— 71 —

“ice age” is . . . a long succession of ages which “shaded without abrupt change of any kind . . .”
p/q: Archibald Geikie, “Geology,” 1879: “That long succession of ages to which the name of the Glacial Period has been given shaded without abrupt change of any kind into what is termed the Human or Recent Period.” — p. 368 (Encyclopædia Britannica, v. 10)
“the overlapping of geological periods having been the rule from the beginning of time”
p/q: Archibald Geikie, “Geology,” 1879: “This dovetailing or overlapping of geological periods has been the rule from the beginning of time, the apparently abrupt transitions in the geological record being due to imperfections in the chronicle.” — p. 368 (Encyclopædia Britannica, v. 10)
“even to-day man is contemporary with the ice-age . . .”
p/q: Archibald Geikie, “Geology,” 1879: “For it is evident that even to-day man is contemporary with the Ice Age in the Alpine valleys and in Finmark.” — p. 368 (Encyclopædia Britannica, v. 10)
“in . . . calculations of this sort . . . there is no theory . . .”
p/q: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “In calculations of this sort there is no theory, they are based on positive facts, limited only by a certain possible amount of error either way.” — p. 48

— 71-2 —

“In short, the conclusions of Geology . . . are appoximate . . . facts and not theories . . .”
p/q: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “In short, the conclusions of geology, at any rate up to the Silurian period when the present order of things was fairly inaugurated, are approximate facts and not theories, while the astronomical conclusions are theories based on data so uncertain, that while in some cases they give results incredibly short . . . in others they give results almost incredibly long . . .” — p. 48

— 72 —

the safest course “seems to be to assume that Geology really proves the duration . . .”
p/q: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “. . . the safest course, in the present state of our knowledge, seems to be to assume that geology really proves the duration of the present order of things to have been somewhere over 100 millions of years . . .” — p. 49
“Astronomy gives an enormous though unknown time in the past . . .”
p/q: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “. . . astronomy gives an enormous though unknown time beyond in the past, and to come in the future, for the birth, growth, maturity, decline, and death of the solar system of which our earth is a small planet now passing through the habitable phase.” — p. 49
“the results incredibly short,” i.e., only 15,000,000 years
p/q: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “. . . in some cases they give results incredibly short, like that of 15 millions of years for the whole past process of the formation of the solar system . . .” — p. 48
“. . . 600,000,000 years” . . . “since sedimentation began in Europe”
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “Reade . . . demands 500 million years since sedimentation began in Europe. . . . Huxley is disposed to demand a thousand millions.” — p. 180
“It is at present, and perhaps always will be, IMPOSSIBLE . . .”
p/q: W. Pengelly, “On the Devonian Age of the World,” Aug. 1861: “In the existing state of our knowledge it is impossible to convert geological into astronomical time: it is at present, and perhaps always will be, beyond our power to determine . . . how many revolutions round the sun the earth made between any two recognized and well-marked events in its geological history.” — p. 332 (The Geologist)
If it is not very material “to the bearings of modern scientific discovery . . .”
p/q: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “. . . as the immediate object of this work is concerned, viz., the bearings of modern scientific discovery on modern thought, it is not very material whether the shortest or longest possible standards of time are adopted.” — p. 49
whether “man has existed in a state of constant though slow progression . . .”
p/q: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “The conclusions as to man’s position in the universe . . . are the same whether man has existed in a state of constant though slow progression for the last 50,000 years of a period of 15 millions, or for the last 500,000 years of a period of 150 millions.” — p. 49

— 73 —

Hindu Chronology is constantly represented . . . as a fiction based on no actual computation
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “These calculations of time are . . . of no importance . . . the scheme, extravagant as it may appear, seems to admit of easy explanation. . . . these periods resolve themselves into very simple elements: the notion of four ages . . . expressed by descending arithmetical progression, as 4, 3, 2, 1; the conversion of units into thousands; and the mythological fiction, that these were divine years, each composed of 360 years of men.  It does not seem necessary to refer the invention to any astronomical computations, or to any attempt to represent actual chronology.” — 1:49-51 fn.
it is often as useful to prove what a thing is not as to show what it may be
see: F. Max Müller, Introduction to the Science of Religion, 1873: “It is the same with the student of the Science of Religion.  He wants to find out what Religion is . . . For that purpose the study of errors is to him more instructive than the study of truth . . .” — p. 9
concerning the figures that were cited a few pages back
see: “The Chronology of the Brahmins,” SD 2:68-70.

— 74 —

We are at the bottom of a cycle and evidently in a transitory state. . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “We are at the bottom of a cycle and evidently in a transitory state.  Plato divides the intellectual progress of the universe during every cycle into fertile and barren periods.  In the sublunary regions, the spheres of the various elements remain eternally in perfect harmony with the divine nature, he says; ‘but their parts,’ owing to a too close proximity to earth, and their commingling with the earthly (which is matter, and therefore the realm of evil), ‘are sometimes according, and sometimes contrary to (divine) nature.’ ” — 1:247
“When those circulations — which Eliphas Levi calls ‘currents of the astral light’ . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “When those circulations — which Eliphas Levi calls ‘currents of the astral light’ — in the universal ether which contains in itself every element, take place in harmony with the divine spirit, our earth and everything pertaining to it enjoys a fertile period.  The occult powers of plants, animals, and minerals magically sympathize with the ‘superior natures,’ and the divine soul of man is in perfect intelligence with these ‘inferior’ ones.  But during the barren periods, the latter lose their magic sympathy, and the spiritual sight of the majority of mankind is so blinded as to lose every notion of the superior powers of its own divine spirit.  We are in a barren period: the eighteenth century, during which the malignant fever of skepticism broke out so irrepressibly, has entailed unbelief as an hereditary disease upon the nineteenth.  The divine intellect is veiled in man; his animal brain alone philosophizes.” — 1:247

— 75 —

“He the Lord” . . . “when the world had become one ocean . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “He, the supreme Nārāyaṇa . . . invested with the form of Brahmā . . . He, the lord {‘when the world had become one ocean’ . . . Harivaṃśa — I., 36}, concluding that within the waters lay the earth, and being desirous to raise it up, created another form for that purpose; and, as, in preceding Kalpas, he had assumed the shape of a fish or a tortoise, so, in this, he took the figure of a boar.” — 1:55-9 & fn. (i.4)
“God” creates a firmament in the midst of the waters . . . and says “let dry land appear.”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters . . . And God said . . . let the dry land appear: and it was so.” — p. 1 (Genesis, 1:6, 9)
“Daniel . . . told off God’s providence by set times
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . Daniel, the most wonderful of all the prophets, told off God’s providence by set times . . .” — p. 271 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
the “Revelation” of John “speaks of a carefully measured cubical city . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . the Book of Revelations . . . speaks of a carefully measured cubical city descending out of the heavens.” — p. 271 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— 76 —

“But the vitalizing power of heaven lay chiefly with the moon . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “But the vitalizing power of heaven lay chiefly with the moon . . . In its vitalizing aspect, it was the Hebrew יהוה . . .” — p. 271 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“and St. Paul enjoins: ‘Let no man judge you for your observance . . .’ ”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . and St. Paul enjoins: — ‘Let no man judge you for your observance of the 7th day and the day of the new moon, — which are a shadow of things to come; but the body (or substance) is of Christ,’ i.e., Jehovah . . .” — p. 271 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “Let no man therefore judge you . . . in respect of a feast day or of the new moon, or a sabbath day: which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ.” — p. 265 (Colossians, 2:16-18)
that function of this power that “made the barren woman . . . a mother . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . that function of this power that ‘made the barren woman the joyful mother of children,’ — ‘for they are the gift of Jehovah’ . . . which is a key to the objection which her husband made . . . as to her going to the man of God: — ‘for it is neither the 7th day nor the day of new moon.’ ” — pp. 271-2 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And she called unto her husband, and said, Send me . . . one of the asses, that I may run to the man of God . . . And he said, Wherefore wilt thou go to him to-day? it is neither new moon, nor sabbath.” — p. 493 (2 Kings, 4:22-3)
The living spiritual powers of the constellations had mighty wars . . .
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “The living spiritual powers of the constellations had mighty wars marked by the movements and positions of the stars and planets, and especially as the result of the conjunction of the moon, earth and sun.” — p. 272 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
Bentley comments on the Hindu “War between the gods and the giants” . . .
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “Bentley comments on the Hindu ‘war between the gods and giants,’ as marked by the eclipse of the sun at the ascending node of the moon, 945 B.C., at which time was born, or produced from the sea, SRI (Sarai, S-r-i, the wife of the Hebrew Abram) . . .” — p. 272 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
see: John Bentley, A Historical View of the Hindu Astronomy, 1825: “When the War between the Gods and the Giants was feigned to take place in India, 945 years B.C. the solstitial Colure cut the Lunar Asterism . . . and formed the boundary between light and darkness at the moment of the autumnal equinox . . .” — p. 40
Sri is also Venus-Aphrodite the Western emblem “of the luni-solar year . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “SRI . . . who was the Venus-Aphroditus of the Westerns, emblem ‘of the luni-solar year, or the moon, the goddess of increase.’ ” — p. 272 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“the grand monument and landmark of the exact period of the lunar year . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . the grand monument and land-mark of the exact period of the lunar year and month, by which this cycle could be calculated, was Mount Sinai, — the Lord Jehovah coming down thereon.” — pp. 272-3 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
“Paul speaks (then) as a mystagogue . . . ‘For this Hagar . . . is Mount Sinai . . .’ ”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “. . . that wonderful, grand, and good man, St. Paul, speaks as a mystagogue, when he says concerning the freed woman and bond woman of Abraham: — ‘For this Hagar (the bond woman of Abraham) is Mount Sinai in Arabia.’ ” — p. 273 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “Which things contain an allegory: for these women are two covenants; the one from mount Sinai, bearing children unto bondage, which is Hagar.  For this Hagar is mount Sinai in Arabia . . .” — p. 251 (Galatians, 4:24-5)

— Footnotes

According to the wonderful chronology of Bentley
see: John Bentley, A Historical View of the Hindu Astronomy, “From the Earliest Dawn of that Science in India, to the Present Time,” 1825.
Sri is the daughter of Bhrigu, one of the Prajâpatis and Rishis . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “Lakshmī or Śrī in later times is the goddess of fortune, wife of Vishṇu . . . According to the Purāṇas, she was the daughter of Bhṛigu . . .” — p. 176
      “[Bhṛigu] is one of the Prajāpatis and great Ṛishis, and is regarded as the founder of the race of the Bhṛigus . . .”  “BHṚIGUS. ‘Roasters, consumers.’  ‘. . . who belonged to the middle or aerial class of gods.’ ”— pp. 54, 55
she is Sarasvati, “the watery,” the wife of Brahmâ
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “SARASWATĪ. ‘Watery . . .’  In the Vedas, Saraswatī . . . is celebrated in the hymns both as a river and a deity. . . . In later times Saraswatī is the wife of Brahmā, the goddess of speech and learning . . .” — p. 284
the three gods and goddesses are one, under three aspects
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Parāśara. — Śrī, the bride of Vishṇu, the mother of the world, is eternal, imperishable.  In like manner as he is all-pervading, so also is she . . . Vishṇu is meaning; she is speech . . . He is the creator; she is creation.  Śrī is the earth; Hari, the support of it. . . . Śauri (Vishṇu) is Śankara (Śiva); and Śrī is the bride of Śiva (Gauri).” — 1:118-19 (i.8)
“The Lord of Sri” is the moon . . . and “Sri is the wife of Narâyâna . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Śrī, the wife of Nārāyaṇa, the god of gods.”  “The lord of Śrī is the moon; she is his unfading light. . . . Lakshmī is the consort of Indra (Indrāṇī) . . .” — 1:118, 119 (i.8)
“Hari . . . is all that is called male . . . Lakshmi is all that is termed female. . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Hari is all that is called male; Lakshmī is all that is termed female.  There is nothing else than they.” — 1:120 (i.8)
Sri is goddess of, and herself “Fortune and Prosperity.”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Whosoever hears this account of the birth of Lakshmī [Śrī], whosoever reads it, shall never lose the goddess Fortune from his dwelling . . . And misfortune shall never visit those amongst mankind who daily recite the praises of Lakshmī, uttered by Indra, which are the origin and cause of all prosperity.” — 1:151 (i.9)

— 76-7 —

“How could a woman be a mountain? and such a mountain! . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “How could a woman be a mountain? and such a mountain!  Yet, in one sense, she was . . . Her name was Hagar, Hebrew הגר, whose numbers read 235, or in exact measure, the very number of lunar months to equal 19 tropical years to complete this cycle . . . Mount Sinai being in the esoteric language of this wisdom, the monument of the exact time of the lunar year and month, by which this spiritual vitalizing cycle could be computed, — and which mountain, indeed, was called (Fuerst) ‘the Mountain of the Moon (Sin).’ ” — p. 273 (Masonic Review, v. 65)

— 77 —

“So also Sarai (SRI), the wife of Abram, could have no child until her name was changed . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, “Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “So, also, Sarai (SRI) the wife of Abram could have no child until her name was changed to Sarah, שרה, giving to her the property of this lunar influence . . .” — p. 273 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
Sarai . . . who was “fair to look upon”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And it came to pass, when he was come near to enter into Egypt, that he said unto Sarai his wife, Behold now, I know that thou art a fair woman to look upon . . . when the Egyptians shall see thee . . . Say, I pray thee, thou art my sister . . .” — p. 14 (Genesis, 12:11-13)
Progenitors . . . those possessed of the “sacred fire” and those devoid of it
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The progenitors (Pitṛis), who . . . were created by Brahmā, were Agnishwāttas and Barhishads; the former being devoid of, and the latter possessed of, fires.” — 1:156 (i.10)
those who have, and those who have not attended . . . to their household sacred fires . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . this distinction is derived from the Vedas.  The first class, or Agnishwāttas, consists of those householders [Gṛihasthas] who, when alive, did not maintain their domestic fires, nor offer burnt-sacrifices; the second, of those who kept up the household flame, and presented oblations with fire.” — 1:156 fn.

— 78 —

Sanandana and other Vedhas, the Sons of Brahmâ . . . “were without desire or passion . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Sanandana and the other sons of Brahmā {Vedhas} were previously created by him.  But they were without desire or passion, inspired with holy wisdom, estranged from the universe, and undesirous of progeny.” — 1:100-2 & fn. (i.7)
Brahmâ . . . saw that those “embodied spirits . . . would not multiply themselves.”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “From Brahmā . . . were born mind-engendered progeny . . . embodied spirits, produced from the person {‘limbs’, gātra} of that all-wise deity. . . . But they were without desire or passion . . . This when Brahmā perceived, he was filled with wrath . . .” — 1:100-2 & fn. (i.7)
he creates other seven mind-born Sons (see “Moksha-Darma” and “Mahabhârata”) . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “But, as they did not multiply themselves, Brahmā created other mind-born sons . . . {in the Mahābhārata, Moksha Dharma, we have, in one place, Marīchi, Atri, Angiras, Pulastya, Pulaha, Kratu, and Vasishṭha . . . In another place of the same, however, we have Daksha substitued for Vasishṭha} . . .” — 1:100 & 101 fn.
see: Mahabharata, “Çanti Parva,” v. 2 [tr. K. M. Ganguli], 1891: “After this, Brahman created . . . seven sons with Daksha completing the tale.” — p. 123 (Mokshadharma Parva, § ccvii)
these Seven Sons . . . are called the seven Rishis of the Third Manvantara . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “In the third period, or Manwantara . . . The seven sons of Vasishṭha were the seven Ṛishis {‘There were (in the first Manwantara) seven celebrated sons of Vasishṭha, who (in the third Manwantara) were sons of Brahmā (i.e. Ṛishis)} . . .” — 3:5-6 & fn. (iii.1)

— Footnotes [78-9]

the Gods . . . dreading the sanctity of . . . ascetics and Yogis . . .
see: “On Personification,” June 1841: “Dhruva . . . betook himself to a life of ascetic devotion, and to the constant contemplation of the Supreme Being.  The fixed abstraction of the little child alarmed, as usual, the minor deities, who feared that the force of his sanctity might overturn their power.  They endeavoured, therefore, by every sort of distraction, to lure or terrify him from his religious exercises.  But all was in vain . . . A continuance in such a course of intense veneration procured him at last the favour of Vishnu . . .” — p. 776 (Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, v. 49)
Some Rishi-Yogis are shown in the Purânas to be far more powerful than the gods.
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Vishṇu said to him: ‘. . . A station shall be assigned to thee, Dhruva, above the three worlds {the polar star} . . . above those of the sun . . . above the regions of the seven Ṛishis and the divinities who traverse the atmosphere.’ ” — 1:173-5 & fn. (i.12)

— 79 —

Brahmâ (the collective Mahat or Universal Divine Mind)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Mahat, the Great principle, is so termed from being the first of the created principles . . . Brahmā implies that which effects the development and augmentation of created things. . . . The Purāṇas generally . . . [attribute] to Mahat or Intelligence the act of creating.  Mahat is, therefore, the divine mind in creative operation . . .” — 1:32-3 fn.
This requires a living Spiritual Fire . . . from the fifth and third states of Pleroma.
see: Pistis-Sophia, tr. G. R. S. Meade (& notes by Meade & HPB), May 15, 1890: “Within the Circle of the Hysterēma [Sensible World] is the Square of primordial Matter . . . Above this is a Triangle, primordial Spirit . . . the Triangle and Square of the Hysterēma are a reflection of the Triangle and Square of the Pleroma [Super-sensible World].”  “In this figure [8] we have a symbol of Fire or Spirit.  The vertical line . . . is the subtlest Fire; this gradually falls into the shape of triangles . . . Six planes or bases in all, and six triangles, with the point the seventh.” — p. 238 note (Lucifer, v. 6)
Cubes, which symbolize the Angelic Beings
see: Proclus, Commentaries on the Timæus of Plato, tr. Thomas Taylor, 1820: “For the beginning from the monad, gives to the soul a progression from [universal] intellect; but the termination in these cubes, evinces the harmony of all the celestial orbs . . .” — 2:100 (Book III)
see: Pistis-Sophia, tr. G. R. S. Meade, May 15, 1890: “[§ 34] . . . Sophia [universal soul] . . . emanated Seventy Logoi, which are celestial Messengers (angels) . . .” — p. 235 (Lucifer, v. 6)
independent and free Intelligences . . . “rebellious to the divine passive law”
p/q: Bishop John Kaye, The Writings and Opinions of Justin Martyr, 1829: “. . . before the creation of man, the Λόγος created Angels, who were endowed with freedom . . . πρωτόγονος, being more subtle than the rest, rebelled against the Divine Law, and persuaded others to join him in his revolt . . .” — p. 198

— 80 —

They who are called in Theology “the Thrones,” and are the “Seat of God”
p/q: Thomas Aquinas, La Somme Théologique, cm. l’Abbé Drioux, 1854: “. . . l’ordre des Trônes {Saint Grégoire et . . . saint Bernard . . . disent que les Trônes sont ainsi appelés, parce qu’ils sont le siége de Dieu} [the order of the Thrones {St. Gregory and . . . St. Bernard . . . say that the Thrones are so called, because they are the Seat of God}] . . .” — p. 579 & fn. (Q. 108, v.)
the higher Angels had broken . . . through the “Seven Circles” . . .
see: J. C. Prichard, Analysis of Egyptian Mythology, 1819: “The Pythagoreans taught that there were various orders of beings superior to men, whose souls had emanated from the deity.  The souls of the superior orders were condemned to enter into human bodies, and undergo on earth purgatorial afflictions.” — p. 205
      “The heavens were divided by these mystics into eight regions or spheres.  The eighth, or highest sphere, was . . . the region of the divine and incorruptible æther . . . the native and original abode of all intelligent and spiritual essences.  As long as they remained there . . . their nature was pure and unsullied.  Certain souls, however . . . descended into the lower world . . . passing down through the seven spheres . . .” — pp. 209-10

— 81 —

the “Lord God,” is in the original the Elohim, or Gods . . . in the plural
see: Augustus R. Grote, Genesis I – II: An Essay, 1880: “In the foregoing translation . . . it was thought advisable to use Elohim . . . instead of ‘God’ and ‘the Lord God,’ because in the first place the plural termination ‘im’ of the word Eloh-im, is lost in the English . . . secondly, our English term ‘God,’ is not a translation of Elohim, but merely a substitute . . .” — p. 31
makes the earthly Adam of dust . . . [and] breathes into him the breath of life . . .
see: Augustus R. Grote, Genesis I – II: An Essay, 1880: “And Yahveh Elohim . . . formed the man . . . of the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life and the man . . . became a living soul.” — p. 24 (Genesis, 2:7)

— 82 —

“The first man is of the Earth, the second . . . is from heaven”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual body. . . . The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit. . . . The first man is of the earth, earthy: the second man is of heaven.” — p. 234 (1 Corinthians, 15:44-5, 47)
Daksha . . . brings forth 10,000 sons for the purpose of peopling the world
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the great father of mankind [Daksha] begot five thousand mighty sons, through whom he expected the world should be peopled . . . {Bhāgavata-purāṇa, VI., 5, 43. . . . Le puissant Pradjāpati . . . eut de sa femme . . . dix mille fils [The mighty Prajāpati . . . had by his wife . . . ten thousand sons]}.” — 2:13 (i.15) & 15 fn.
Narada . . . the great Rishi . . . frustrates Daksha’s aim . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “NĀRADA. . . . He is one of the Prajāpatis, and also one of the seven great Ṛishis. . . . Another authority states that he sprang from the forehead of Brahmā . . . The Māha-bhārata and some Purāṇas state that he frustrated the scheme which Daksha had formed for peopling the earth . . .” — p. 218
persuading those Sons to remain holy ascetics and eschew marriage
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “HARYAŚWAS.  Five [or ten] thousand sons of the patriarch Daksha, begotten by him for the purpose of peopling the earth.  The sage Nārada dissuaded them from producing offspring . . .” — p. 120
“Perish in thy present (Deva or angelic) form . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘Nārada, perish (in your present form); and take up your abode in the womb.’ {Harivaṃśa, 140}.” — 2:20 fns.
calling his father Brahmâ “a false teacher” for advising him to get married
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The Nārada-pancha-rātra relates that Brahmā advised his son Nārada to marry, but Nārada censured his father as a false teacher, because devotion to Kṛishṇa was the only true means of felicity.  Brahmā then cursed Nārada to lead a life of sensuality . . .” — p. 219
the Naradiya is credited with containing 25,000 Stanzas
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Nārada or Nāradīya Purāṇa.  ‘Where Nārada has described the duties which were observed in the Bṛihat Kalpa, that is called the Nāradīya, having twenty-five thousand stanzas.’ ” — 1:li (Preface)
the fragment of about 3,000 Stanzas
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “If the number of verses [25,000] be here correctly stated, the Purāṇa has not fallen into my hands.  The copy I have analysed contains not many more than three thousand ślokas.” — 1:li (Preface)

— Footnotes

Seth . . . is not only the primitive god of the Semites . . . but also their “semi-divine ancestor.”
p/q: C. Staniland Wake, Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “Seth . . . is not only the primitive god of the Semites, but also their semi-divine ancestor.” — p. 61
“the Seth of Genesis, the father of Enoch (the man) . . .”
p/q: C. Staniland Wake, Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “. . . his genealogy as ‘the Seth of Genesis, the father of Enoch (the man) must be considered as originally running parallel with that derived from the Elohim, Adam’s father.’ [Bunsen] {God in History, Vol i., pp. 233-4.}” — p. 61 & fn.
“According to Bunsen, the Deity . . . was the primitive god . . .”
p/q: C. Staniland Wake, Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “According to Bunsen, this deity was the primitive god of Northern Egypt and Palestine, and appears as the background of religious consciousness among the Semites.” — p. 61
Seth became considered in the later Theology of the Egyptians as “an evil dæmon
see: C. Staniland Wake, Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “ ‘Seth was at one time . . . a great god, universally adored throughout Egypt . . . But, subsequently, in the course of the Twentieth Dynasty, he is suddenly treated as an evil demon . . .’ ” — p. 60
for he is one with Typhon and one with the Hindu demons
see: C. Staniland Wake, Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “The Chinese notion of the serpent or dragon dwelling above the clouds . . . reminds us of the Aryan myth of Vritra, or Ahi, the throttling snake, or dragon with three heads, who hides away the rain clouds . . . analogous to Typhon . . . [who] bore the same name as a very destructive wind which was much dreaded by the Phœnicians and Egyptians. . . . We have here a reference to the serpent as the embodiment of the Evil Being; and in the later identification of Seth with Typhon, the enemy of Osiris . . .” — pp. 76, 77

— 82-3 —

Narada is the Deva-Rishi of Occultism par excellence . . .
see: W. J. Wilkins, Hindu Mythology, 1882: “nārada. . . . He is the messenger of the gods, and is often described as imparting information that was only known to them.”  “Manu declares that he was one of the Maharishis whom he created at the beginning of the age. . . . In another birth Nārada was the son of Kasyapa and a daughter of Daksha.”  “In the Mahābhārata, Nārada figures as a religious teacher . . . Nārada was the friend and companion of Krishna . . . Great honour is given to Nārada because he is said to have revealed to Valmiki the ‘Rāmāyana,’ which opens as follows: —
‘To sainted Nārad, prince of those
 Whose lore in words of wisdom flows,
 Whose constant care and chief delights
 Were scripture and ascetic rites . . .’ ” — pp. 317, 318, 319, 320

— 83 —

among . . . “vibrating Flames and Sparks” . . . the workmen proceed to create man, “male and female” . . .
p/q: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “And therefore were the Prior Worlds destroyed . . . But these which existed not in conformation are called vibrating flames and sparks, like as when the worker in stone striketh sparks from the flint with his hammer, or as when the smith smiteth the iron and dasheth forth sparks on every side. . . . these sparks which fly forth flame and scintillate, but shortly they are extinguished. . . . And those sparks are called the Prior Worlds, and suddenly they perished. . . . Then proceeded the workman unto His work, and was conformed, namely as Male and Female.” — p. 301 (“The Lesser Holy Assembly” [Hā-’Idrā’ Zūtā’ Qaddīshā’], x.421-3, 426-7)
From a Light-Bearer . . . of insupportable brightness proceeded a radiating Flame . . .
p/q: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887:
      “429.  From a Light-Bearer of insupportable brightness proceeded a Radiating Flame, dashing off like a vast and mighty hammer those sparks which were the Prior Worlds.
        430.  And with most subtle ether were these intermingled and bound mutually together, but only when they were conjoined together, even the Great Father and Great Mother.
        431.  From Hoa, Himself, is AB, the Father; and from Hoa, Himself, is Ruach, the Spirit; Who are hidden in the Ancient of Days, and therein is that ether concealed.
        432.  And It was connected with a light-bearer, which went forth from that Light-Bearer of insupportable brightness, which is hidden in the Bosom of Aima, the Great Mother.” — p. 302 (“The Lesser Holy Assembly,” ch. 10)

— 83-4 —

“The Pre-Adamite Kings.  ‘We have learned in the Siphrah D’Tzniootha . . .’ ”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The Pre-Adamite Kings.  ‘We have learned in the Siphrah D’Tznioothah: That the At-tee’kah D’At-tee’keen Ancient of Ancients, before He prepared His Form, built kings and engraved kings, and sketched out kings, and they could not exist: till He overthrew them and hid them until after a time, therefore it is written; “And these are the kings which reigned in the land of Edom.” . . .’ ” — p. 386

— 84 —

“And they could not exist til Resha’Hiv’rah, the White Head . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “And they could not exist until Resha’Hiv’rah the White Head, the At-tee’kah D’ At-tee’keen Ancient of Ancients, arranged Himself. . . . [and] formed all forms Above and Below. . . . Before He arranged Himself in His Form, had not been formed all those whom He desired to form, and all worlds have been destroyed {Zohar iii, 135a, Brody Ed.} . . .” — p. 386 & fn.
“they did not remain in their places, because the form of the Kings had not been formed . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “. . . they did not remain in their places, because the forms of the kings had not been formed as it ought to be, and the Holy City had not been prepared {Zohar iii, 292a, Idrah Zootah. Brody Ed.}.” — p. 387 & fn.
the law which the Kabala calls the Balance . . . everything that exists does so as male and female
see: Christian D. Ginsburg, The Kabbalah, 1865: “. . . the two opposites, masculine and feminine, and the uniting principle, the development of the Sephiroth, and of life generally, is symbolically called the Balance . . .” — p. 10
Chochmah, Wisdom . . . had to diffuse itself in, and through, Binah . . . Understanding
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “Thought and the Word [’Hokhmah, Wisdom].  ‘. . . Thought, is the first (principle) of all . . . When this Thought began to diffuse itself, it came to the place where the Spirit rests . . . Binah Understanding . . . that Spirit spreads itself and brings out a Voice {’Hokhmah Wisdom, or the Word} . . . and this Voice comprises all the other Forces . . . And when they look in the degrees, this is the Thought; this is the Understanding; this is Voice . . . and all are One.’ ” — pp. 377-8 & fn.
the First Root-race . . . had to be overthrown and “hidden until after a time”
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘. . . [the] Ancient of Ancients . . . built kings . . . and they could not exist: till He overthrew them and hid them until after a time . . .’ ” — p. 386
They passed by together” . . . “And he died and another reigned in his stead”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘They passed by together’ as it is written: ‘And he died’ and another ‘reigned in his stead.’ (Gen. xxvi, 31 sq.) ‘They saw, they marveled, were troubled,’ (Ps. xlviii, 5) that they did not remain in their places, because the forms of the kings had not been formed as it ought to be, and the Holy City had not been prepared {Zohar iii, 292a}.’ ” — p. 387 & fn.

— 84-5 —

“the Emanation of the Male and Female Principles” in the Zohar (ibid.)
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The Emanation of the Male and Female Principles. . . . {Zohar iii, 290a, Brody Ed. Idra Zootah}.” — pp. 387 & 388 fn.

— 85 —

the Wisdom . . . “does not shine except in male and female.”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘This Wisdom comprises All, when it goeth forth and is illuminated from the Holy Ancient it does not shine except in male and female.’ ” — p. 387
Hohmah, Wisdom, is the Father, and Binah, understanding, is the Mother . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘Wisdom is the Father and Understanding is the Mother . . . and when they connect one with the other they bring forth and diffuse and emanate, Truth.  In the sayings of R. Ye-yeva, Sabah, i.e., the Old, we learned this; What is Binah Understanding?  But when they connect in one another, the י (Yod) in the ה (Heh), they become impregnated and produce a Son.  And therefore it is called Binah Understanding.  It means BeN YaH i.e., Son of YaH.  This is the completeness of the Whole.” — pp. 387-8
“We find it rather unwise on the part of Catholic writers . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “We find it rather unwise on the part of Catholic writers to pour out their vials of wrath in such sentences as these: ‘In a multitude of pagodas, the phallic stone, ever and always assuming, like the Grecian batylos, the brutally indecent form of the lingham . . . the Maha Deva.’  Before casting slurs on a symbol whose profound metaphysical meaning is too much for the modern champions of that religion of sensualism par excellence, Roman Catholicism, to grasp, they are in duty bound to destroy their oldest churches, and change the form of the cupolas of their own temples.  The Mahody of Elephanta, the Round Tower of Bhangulpore, the minarets of Islam — either rounded or pointed — are the originals of the Campanile column of San Marco, at Venice, of the Rochester Cathedral, and of the modern Duomo of Milan.  All of these steeples, turrets, domes, and Christian temples, are the reproductions of the primitive idea of the lithos, the upright phallus.” — 2:5
‘In a multitude of pagodas, the phallic stone . . .’
p/q: H.-R. Gougenot des Mousseaux, Les Hautes Phénomènes de la Magie, 1864: “Dans une multitude de pagodes, la pierre, encore et toujours, revêtant comme les bétyles grecs la forme brutalement impudique du lingam, est adorée sous le nom de Maha-Déva [In a multitude of pagodas, the stone, still and always adorned like the Greek batylos in the brutally lewd form of the lingam, is worshipped under the name of Mahā-Deva] . . .” — p. 24

— 86 —

Brahmâ . . . breathed out . . . “Asuras” (from Asu, breath)
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ASURA. . . . According to the Taittirīya Brāhmaṇa, the breath (asu) of Prajāpata [Brahmā] became alive, and ‘with that breath he created the Asuras.’ ” — p. 27
the newly-created men, “were the shadows of the Shadows”
see: Charles Johnston, “The Tide of Life,” May 1888: “The first man (Humanity) is Etherial too, for he is but the shadow (Chhaya) ‘in the image’ of his progenitors, because he is the ‘astral body’ or image of his Pitar (father). . . . [H.P.B.]” — p. 45 fn. (The Path, v. 3)

— 87 —

— Footnotes

“Huxley, supported by the most evident discoveries in Comparative Anatomy . . .”
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “Huxley, supported by the most evident discoveries in Comparative Anatomy, could utter the momentous sentence that the anatomical differences between man and the highest apes are less than those between the latter and the lowest apes.  In relation to our genealogical tree of man, the necessary conclusion follows that the human race has evolved gradually from the true apes.” — p. 49
“Nowhere, in the older deposits, is an ape to be found . . .”
p/q: S. R. Pattison and Friedrich Pfaff, The Age and Origin of Man, 1883: “Nowhere, in the older deposits, is an ape to be found that approximates more closely to man, or a man that approximates more closely to an ape . . . The same gulf which is found to-day between man and the ape, goes back with undiminished breadth and depth to the tertiary period.  This fact alone is sufficient to make its untenableness clear to every one . . .” — p. 51 (“The Origin of Man” by Pfaff)

— 88 —

The Endowers of man with his conscious, immortal ego, are the “Solar Angels”
see: “Additional Facts and Explanations Concerning the Globes and the Monads”: “. . . the Manasa-Dhyanis (the Solar Devas, or the Agnishwatta Pitris) the ‘givers of intelligence and consciousness’ to man . . .” — SD 1:181
“persevering ceaseless devotion” (pranidhâna) . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The sage who would bring his mind into a fit state for (the performance of) devout contemplation . . . must fix his mind intently on the supreme Brahma, practising holy study {The fifth observance is . . . praṇidhāna, ‘persevering devotion.’  See the Yoga-śāstra, II., 32} . . .” — 5(I):229 & fn. (vi.7)
Plato’s expression . . . on the (human) soul . . . “a compound of the same and the other
p/q: Voltaire, Philosophical Dictionary, 1824: “Let us see if thy reason alone can have given thee light enough by which to conclude . . . that thou hast a soul. . . . according to the divine Plato, it is a compound of the same, and the other.” — 6:179-80
see: Plato, Dialogues, tr. B. Jowett, 1874: “Now God did not make the soul after the body . . . he took of the unchangeable and indivisible essence, and also of the divisible and corporeal which is generated, and he made a third sort of intermediate essence out them both . . . and thus he compounded a nature . . . containing an admixture of the same and of the other and of the essence.” — 2:528 (Timaeus, § 34)

— 88-9 —

“there must be something within us which produces our thoughts . . .”
p/q: Voltaire, Philosophical Dictionary, 1824: “There must be something within us which produces our thoughts; that something must be very subtle; it is a breath; it is fire; it is ether; it is a quintessence; it is a slender likeness; it is an entelechia; it is a number; it is a harmony.” — 6:180

— 89 —

There are seven classes of Pitris . . . three incorporeal and four corporeal
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The Vāyu, Matsya, and Padma Purāṇas, and Hari Vaṃśa . . . agree in distinguishing the Pitṛis into seven classes; three of which are without form . . . and four are corporeal . . .” — 3:157 fn.
and two kinds, the Agnishwatta and the Barhishad
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The progenitors (Pitṛis), who . . . were created by Brahmā, were the Agnishwāttas and Barhishads; the former being devoid of, and the latter possessed of, fires.” — 1:156 (i.10)
Barhishad . . . are reborn as the Sons of Atri, and are the “Pitris of the Demons”
see: The Ordinances of Manu, tr. Burnell, ed. Hopkins, 1884: “The Barhiṣads, sons of Atri, are said (to be the fathers) of Daityas [titans] . . . and Rakṣasas [demons] . . .” — p. 68 (iii.196)
the Agnishwatta are reborn as Sons of Marichi . . . and are the Pitris of the Gods
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “According to Kullūka on the Laws of the Mānavas, III., 195, the Agnishwāttas were sons of Marīchi . . .” — 2:303 fn.
      “Agnishwāttas — sons of Marīchi, and Pitṛis of the gods (Manu, Matsya, Padma) . . .” — 3:160 fn.
the Vayu Purâna declares all the seven orders to have originally been the first gods, the Vairâjas . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the Vāyu Purāṇa declares the seven orders of Pitṛis to have been, originally, the first gods, the Vairājas, whom Brahmā, with the eye of Yoga, beheld in the eternal spheres, and who are the gods of the gods . . .” — 3:158 fn.
the Matsya adds that the Gods worshipped them
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The Matsya agrees with this latter statement, and adds, that the gods worship them . . .” — 3:159 fn.
the Harivamsa . . . distinguishes the Virâjas as one class of the Pitris only
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The Hari Vaṃśa {Sl. 935} . . . distinguishes the Vairājas as one class only of the incorporeal Pitṛis.” — 3:159 & fn.
the Secret Teachings . . . identify the Virâjas with the elder Agnishwattas
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . in the same work [Vāyu Purāṇa], we have the incorporeal Pitṛis called Vairājas . . .” — 3:158 fn.
the Rajasas, or Abhutarajasas . . . Vishnu is said . . . to have incarnated through them
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “In the third Manwantara, Tushita {Vishṇu} was again born of Satyā, as Satya . . . In the next period, Satya became Hari . . . Hari was again born . . . as Mānasa, along with the gods called Abūtarajasas {Rajasas}.” — 3:17 & fns.
“In the Raivata Manvantara, again, Hari, best of gods, was born of Sambhuti . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘In the Raivata patriarchal period, again, Hari, best of gods, was born, of Saṃbhūti, as the divine Mānasa, — originating with the deities called Rajasas.’ ” — 3:17 fn.
Sambhuti was a daughter of Daksha, and wife of Marichi
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Saṃbhūti . . . daughter of Daksha, and wife of Marīchi . . .” — 5(II):168
the Agnishwatta, who . . . are ever associated with Manasas
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “AGNISHWĀTTAS.  Pitṛis or Manes of the gods . . . descendants of Marīchi.” — p. 8
      “KAŚYAPA. . . . he was the son of Marīchi, the son of Brahmā, and he was the father of Vivaswat, the father of Manu, progenitor [Prajāpati] of mankind. . . . He is one of the seven great Ṛishis . . .” — p. 153
      “ ‘The seven Ṛishis’ . . . or the Prajā-patis, ‘the mind-born sons’ [mānasas, mānasaputras] of Brahmā . . .” — p. 268
“Manasa is no inappropriate name for a deity associated with the Rajasas. . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Mānasa is no inappropriate name for a deity associated with the Rajasas.  We appear to have, in it, mānasam — the same as manas — with the change of termination required to express male personification.” — 3:17 fn. (iii.1)
All the sons of Virâja are Manasa, says Nilakantha.
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Nilakaṇṭha says that Virāja’s sons were mānasa . . .” — 3:159 fn.

— Footnotes

the Vayu and Matsya Purânas identify . . . the Agnishwatta with the seasons . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The Vāyu and Matsya add a fourth class, the Kavyas; identifying them with the cyclic years . . . and Agnishwāttas, with the seasons; and the Barhishads, with the months.” — 2:303 fn.
The Vayu Purâna shows . . . Virâja-loka inhabited by the Agnishwattas.
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Agnishwāttas . . . The Vāyu makes them residents of Viraja-loka . . .” — 3:160 fn.

— 90 —

the incorporeal Pitris are called Vairâjas from being the Sons of Virâja
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Again, in the same work [Vāyu Purāṇa], we have the incorporeal Pitṛis called Vairājas, from being the sons of the Prajāpati Virāja . . .” — 3:158 fn.
There are thirty-three crores . . . of gods . . . “they may all be devas . . .”
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — II,” March 1887: “Do not make the mistake of thinking . . . that because we have thirty-three crores of Devas, we therefore worship thirty-three crores of gods.” — p. 360 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
“This is an unfortunate blunder . . . generally committed by Europeans. . . .”
p/q: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — II,” March 1887: “This is an unfortunate blunder generally committed by Europeans.  Deva is a kind of spiritual being, and because the same word is used in ordinary parlance to mean god, it by no means follows that we have and worship thirty-three crores of gods.  These beings, as may be naturally inferred, have a certain affinity with one of the three component upadhis into which we have divided man.” — p. 360 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
Thus the twelve great gods, Jayas, created by Brahmâ to assist him in the work of creation . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “In the beginning of the Kalpa, twelve gods, named Jayas, were created by Brahmā, as his deputies and assistants in the creation.  They, lost in meditation, neglected his commands . . .” — 2:26 fn.
they were cursed to be repeatedly born in each Manvantara . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . he cursed them to be repeatedly born in each Manwantara, till the seventh.  They were, accordingly, in the several successive Manwantaras, Ajitas, Tushitas, Satyas, Haris, Vaikuṇṭhas, Sādhyas, and Ādityas.” — 2:26-7 fn. (Vāyu Purāṇa)
they are Tushitas (in the second Kalpa), and Adityas in the Vaivasvata period . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “These, who, in the Chākshusha Manwantara, were the gods called Tushitas, were called the twelve Ādityas, in the Manwantara of Vaivaswata.” — 2:27 (i.15)

— 91 —

With the Brahmins the Pitris are very sacred, because they are the Progenitors
see: The Laws of Manu, tr. G. Bühler, 1886: “A Brāhmaṇa who has been invited to a (rite) in honour of the manes [progenitors] shall always control himself . . . For the manes attend the invited Brāhmaṇas, follow them (when they walk) like the wind . . . The (various) classes of the manes are declared to be the sons of all those sages . . . the Agnishvāttas, the children of Marīchi, are famous in the world (as the manes) of the gods.” — pp. 110-12 (iii.188-9, 194, 195)
see: Edward Davies, Celtic Researches, 1804: “ ‘On the day of the conjunction, obsequies are performed (as offerings) to the manes of the Pitris, or progenitors of the human race . . .’ ” — p. 198
their ritual is more important than the worship of the gods
p/q: The Laws of Manu, tr. G. Bühler, 1886: “For twice-born men [initiated Brahmans] the rite in honour of the manes [progenitors] is more important than the rite in honour of the gods . . .” — p. 113 (iii.203)
Pitris . . . seven classes . . . three of these are . . . formless, while four are corporeal
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The account given of the Pitṛis is much the same in all the Purāṇas.  ‘They agree in distinguishing them into seven classes, three of which are without form, or composed of intellectual, not elementary substance . . . and four are corporeal.’ ” — p. 236
it is the Asuras who form the first three classes of Pitris — . . . “born in the body of night”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā then, being desirous of creating the four orders of beings . . . collected his mind into itself.  Whilst thus concentrated, the quality of darkness pervaded his body; and thence the demons (the Asuras) were first born . . . that form which was composed of the rudiment of darkness . . . became night.” — 1:79-80 (i.5)
the other four were produced from the body of twilight
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . thinking of himself as the father of the world, the progenitors (the Pitṛis) were born from his side.  The body, when he abandoned it, became the Sandhyā (or evening twilight) . . .” — 1:80-1 (i.5)
Their fathers, the gods, were doomed to be born fools on Earth . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “According to a legend given by the Vāyu . . . the first Pitṛis were the sons of the gods.  The gods, having offended Brahmā . . . were cursed, by him, to become fools . . .” — 3:157 fn.

— Footnotes

“The Pitris are not the ancestors of the present living men . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The Pitris are not the ancestors of the present living men, but those of the human kind or Adamic race; the spirits of human races which, on the great scale of descending evolution, preceded our races of men, and were physically, as well as spiritually, far superior to our modern pigmies.  In Manava-Dharma-Sastra they are called the Lunar ancestors.” — 1:xxxviii
“In Manava-Dharma-Sastra they are called the Lunar ancestors.”
see: Manava-Dharma-Sastra, tr. A. L. Deslongchamps, 1833: “Les Pitris . . . sont des personnages divins considérés comme les ancêtres des Dieux, des Génies et du genre humain; ils habitent la lune [The Pitris . . . are divine individuals who are viewed as the ancestors of the Gods, the Genii and the human race; they inhabit the moon].” — p. 105 fn.

— 92 —

Asura means “spiritual divine,” and the word is used . . . for Supreme Spirit . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ASURA.  ‘Spiritual, divine.’  In the oldest parts of the Ṛigveda this term is used for the supreme spirit . . .” — p. 27
in the sense of a “God,” the term “Asura” is applied to Varuna and Indra and . . . Agni . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In the sense of ‘god’ it was applied to several of the chief deities, as to Indra, Agni, and Varuṇa.  It afterwards acquired an entirely opposite meaning, and came to signify, as now, a demon or enemy of the gods.” — p. 27
“Asura” is the lord Asura Visvavedas, the “all-knowing” . . .
p/q: Zend-Avesta, Part I, tr. James Darmesteter, 1880: “This god was named . . . after his spiritual attributes Asura, ‘the Lord,’ Asura viśvadevas, ‘the all-knowing Lord,’ Asura Mazdhā, ‘the Lord of high knowledge’ {Or perhaps ‘the Lord who bestows intelligence’ (Benfey, ‘Asura Medhā and Ahura Mazdāo’)}.” — p. lviii & fn. (Introduction)
the Indo-Iranian Asura was always regarded as sevenfold
see: Zend-Avesta, Part I, tr. James Darmesteter, 1880: “The Indo-Iranian Asura was often conceived as sevenfold . . . the supreme god was often made sevenfold, as well as the worlds over which he ruled.” — p. lix (Introduction)

— 93 —

(Compare also what is said about Makara and the Kumâras in connection with the Zodiac.)
see: “Poseidon’s Five Ministers,” SD 2:576-80.
Ahriman destroys the Bull created by Ormazd
see: James Freeman Clarke, “Zoroaster and the Zend-Avesta,” Aug. 1869: “. . . Ormazd had also produced the great primitive Bull, in which, as the representative of the animal world, the seeds of all living creatures were deposited.  While Ormazd was thus completing his light-creation, Ahriman, in his dark abyss, was completing a corresponding creation of darkness . . . He passed into the primal Bull . . . and injured him so that he died.” — pp. 162-3 (Atlantic Monthly, v. 24)
the Bull . . . the emblem of terrestrial illusive life
see: James Freeman Clarke, “Zoroaster and the Zend-Avesta,” Aug. 1869: “But when he died . . . the whole realm of clean animals and plants came from the Bull’s body.” — p. 163 (Atlantic Monthly, v. 24)
the “germ of sorrow”
see: Léon Boré, “Cours sur le Panthéisme,” 1839: “Enfin, Sosiosch, le dieu de la victoire . . . rendra le bonheur au monde entier après l’avoir purifié, après avoir extirpé le germe du péché et de la douleur [Finally, Sosiosh, the god of victory . . . will restore happiness to the whole world after having purified it, after having exterminated the germ of sin and sorrow].” — p. 420 (L’Université Catholique, v. 7)
Typhon cuts Osiris into fourteen pieces
see: James Freeman Clarke, Ten Great Religions, 1871: “Isis became the wife of Osiris, who went through the world taming it by means of oratory, poetry, and music.  When he returned, Typhon . . . made an ark the size of Osiris’s body . . . Osiris got into it, and they fastened down the lid . . . [Isis] then took the ark and the elder son and set sail. . . . Typhon, hunting by moonlight, saw the ark, with the body of Osiris, which he tore into fourteen parts and threw them about.” — pp. 244-5
in order to prevent his peopling the world
see: James Freeman Clarke, Ten Great Religions, 1871: “. . . Osiris is in general the productive, the creative power in nature . . . and Typhon the destructive property in nature; while Horus is the mediator between creation and destruction. . . . essentially corresponding to the Hindoo triad, Brahma, Siva, Vishnu . . .” — p. 247
and Typhon becomes . . . the Power of Darkness
see: James Freeman Clarke, Ten Great Religions, 1871: “In the Egyptian system, as in the later faith of India, the evil principle appears as a power of destruction.  Siva and Typhon are the destroying agencies from whom proceed all the mischief done in the world.” — p. 497
the three classes of the Arupa Pitris . . . “composed of intellectual not elementary substances”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “They agree {Harivaṃśa, śl. 932} in distinguishing the Pitṛis into seven classes; three of which are without form . . . or composed of intellectual, not elementary, substance . . .” — 3:157 fns.

— Footnotes

“the great red Dragon having seven heads and ten horns . . .”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And there appeared another wonder in heaven; and behold a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and seven crowns upon his heads.  And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth . . .” — p. 329 (Revelation of St. John, 12:3-4)

— 94 —

Nirmanakayas . . . reappearing on this globe . . . as Kings, Rishis, and heroes
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “These Bōdhisattvas . . . might immediately become most perfect Buddhas, did they not prefer, from unlimited charity towards animated beings . . . to re-incorporate themselves in human shape for the benefit of man.”  “Nirmānakāya . . . [the] body in which the Bōdhisattva appears upon earth in order to teach man . . .” — pp. 37, 38
“Man must not be like one of us,” say the creative gods
see: John William Colenso, The Pentateuch, Part V, 1865: “And Jehovah-Elohim said, ‘Behold, the man has become as one of us, for the knowledge of good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand and take also of the tree of life . . . and live for ever . . .’  And Jehovah-Elohim put him forth from the garden of Eden . . .” — p. 241 (Genesis, 3:22-3)
see: Proclus, On the Theology of Plato, tr. Thomas Taylor, 1816: “. . . Plato says, that the one demiurgus calls on the many demiurgi to weave together the mortal and immortal natures [Timæus, § 16] . . . however the demiurgus says, ‘Yet if these are generated and participate of life through me they will become equal to the Gods’ . . .” — 2:126 (vii.9)
the creative gods, entrusted with the fabrication of the lower animal but higher
see: Proclus, On the Theology of Plato, tr. Thomas Taylor, 1816: “After this, the demiurgus says [to the creative gods], ‘That mortal natures therefore may subsist . . . convert yourselves according to nature to the fabrication of animals, imitating the power which I employed in your generation.’ [Timæus, § 16] . . . the first demiurgus excites the second fabrication supernally from his own exalted place of survey.” — 2:127 (vii.10)

— Footnotes

their highest Archangel, St. Michael, who is shown to conquer . . . the Dragon of Wisdom
see: Dictionary of the Bible, ed. William Smith, 1863: “To present the serpent-form . . . impaled as the trophy of a conqueror . . . expressed the same idea as the dragon in the popular representations of the Archangel Michael . . . The idea primarily connected with the serpent in the history of the Fall . . . is that of wisdom . . .” — 3:1215
St. Michael . . . was the first to refuse to create!
see: Hargrave Jennings, Phallicism: Celestial and Terrestrial, 1884: “Included in this universal obeisance are the rebellious inhabitants [Fallen Angels] — now mastered by Saint Michael — imprisoned in the vast abysses of the nethermost ‘Hold’ — namely, Darkness and Matter . . . this Archangel Saint Michael is the invincible sexless, celestial ‘Energy’ . . . clothed, and at the same time armed, in the denying mail of the Gnostic ‘refusal to create.’ ” — pp. 212-13
raising a noise during certain eclipses to scare away the “great red Dragon” . . .
see: John Owen, Five Great Skeptical Dramas of History, 1896: “. . . I allude to eclipses, whether solar or lunar. . . . The sudden stealing without any presage or warning of some mysterious dark unknown monster upon the sun or moon, destroying for the time its brilliant form . . . Ancient races . . . {In the East the sun- and moon-devouring monster is generally a dragon, as in the Hindu legend of Rāhu} . . . endeavoured to frighten away the enemies of light by shouting, drum-beating and other loud noises.” — p. 40 & fn.

— 95 —

(See Part II. of this volume . . .)
see: § XVIII.  “On the Myth of the ‘Fallen Angel,’ in its Various Aspects”: (A.) “The Evil Spirit: Who, and What?” pp. 475-83; (B.) “The Gods of Light Proceed from the Gods of Darkness,” pp. 483-92; (C.) “The Many Meanings of the ‘War in Heaven,’ ” pp. 492-505.
too spiritual and pure . . . endowed as it is with every negative (Nirguna) perfection
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “It is soul — one (in all bodies), pervading, uniform, perfect . . . independent {Nirguṇa; rendered ‘void of qualities’} . . . so the nature of the great spirit is single, though its forms be manifold . . .” — 2:328-9 (ii.14)

— Footnotes

The Gnostics, then, were right in regarding the Jewish God as belonging to a lower class . . .
see: “The Ignation Epistles,” Dublin Review, v. 21, 1873: “Above all, the later Gnostics mentioned by Irenæus in his first book had denied that the Jewish religion came from the supreme God.  To them Judaism was the religion of the Demiurge, the lower God . . .” — p. 398

— 96 —

Plato speaks, in the Phædrus, of a winged race of men.
see: Plato, Works, v. 1, tr. Henry Cary, 1848: “The rest follow, all eager for the upper region, but being unable to reach it they are . . . striking against each other . . . and many break many of their feathers . . . it is the nature of the wing by which the soul is borne aloft . . . but whenever from inability to keep up . . . filled with oblivion and vice, and so weighed down, and from being weighed down has lost its wings, and fallen to the earth . . .” — p. 324 (Phædrus, 59-60)
Aristophanes . . . speaks of a race androgynous and with round bodies.
see: Plato, Works, tr. Thomas Taylor, 1804: “. . . you must first be informed what the human nature is, and what changes it has undergone.  For our nature of old was different from what it is at present. . . . For then existed actually and flourished hermaphrodites . . . In the next place, the entire form of every individual of the human kind was cylindrical . . .” — 3:474-5 (The Banquet, “The Speech of Aristophanes”)
“The circuit having been accomplished, the knot was loosened. . . .”
p/q: Le Pimandre de Mercure Trismegiste, [tr. from the Greek] with cm. by François, Monsieur de Foix, 1579: “. . . le ciruit estant acomply, le neud de toutes choses a esté lache . . . Car tous les animaus, qui estoient des deux sexes, furent desliez, ensemble l’homme [the cycle being fulfilled, the bond of all things has been loosened . . . For all animals, which were of two sexes (hermaphrodite), were untied (separated), together with man].” — p. 67 (i.18)
see: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes, tr. J. D. Chambers, 1882: “The period being completed, the connecting bond of all things was loosed by the will of God; for all the living creatures being male-female, were loosed apart along with the Man, and became partly some male, but some female in like manner.” — p. 10 (Poemandres, i.18)
“the causes had to produce effects on earth”
p/q: Le Pimandre de Mercure Trismegiste, [tr. from the Greek] with cm. by François, Monsieur de Foix, 1579: “. . . les causes des effects qui deuoient estre produicts en la matiere [the causes of the effects which had to be produced in matter] . . .” — p. 67 (i.18 Commentary)
the ancient Quiché Manuscript . . . published by the late Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg
see: Popol-Vuh, “Le Livre Sacré et les Mythes de l’Antiquité Américaine, avec les Livres Héroïques et Historiques des Quichés” [The Sacred Book and Myths of American Antiquity, with the Heroic and Historical Books of the Quichés], tr. Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg, 1861.
the first men . . . “whose sight was unlimited, and who knew all things at once”
p/q: Max Müller, Chips from a German Workshop, 1867-75: “Four men are mentioned as the real ancestors of the human race . . . their creation was a wonder wrought by the Creator.  They could reason and speak, their sight was unlimited, and they knew all things at once.” — 1:336-7 (§ XIV, “Popol Vuh”)

— Footnotes

the Nazarenes . . . held their “Mysteries of Life” in Nazara (ancient and modern Nazareth) . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The Nazireate sect existed long before the laws of Moses, and originated among . . . the people of Galilee . . . where was built Nazara, the present Nazareth.  It is in Nazara that the ancient Nazorïa or Nazireates held their ‘Mysteries of Life’ or ‘assemblies,’ as the word now stands in the translation {‘Codex Nazaræus,’ ii., 305}, which were but the secret mysteries of initiation . . .” — 2:131 & fn.
see: S. F. Dunlap, Sōd, The Son of the Man, 1861: “ ‘Give them mysterious words by which they may be taught.  Interpret for them the Great Life, speak concerning the assemblies of Life, and instruct Nazoria living in the world, that they put on robes of splendor and, following Thee, go above! . . .’ — Codex Nas., II. 305.” — p. vi

— 97 —

Seven primitive men, created by Nature from the “heavenly Man”
see: Thrice-Greatest Hermes, tr. & cm. G. R. S. Mead, 1906: “Nature embraced by Man . . . brought forth seven ‘men,’ in correspondence with the natures of the Seven [Rulers], male-female . . .” — 2:11 (Pœmandres, § 16)
      “16. Our treatise then describes the first appearance of man . . . The Celestial Man, or type of humanity, was gradually differentiating himself . . . The first incarnate men appear to have been at first also hermaphrodite . . .” — 2:37 (Commentary)
all partake of the qualities of the “Seven Governors” . . . who loved Man
see: Gerald Massey, The Natural Genesis, 1883: “. . . [Man] considered the operations or workmanships of the Seven; but they loved him, and every one made him partaker of his own order. . . . he having the nature of the Harmony of the Seven . . . Nature continued not, but forthwith brought forth Seven Men . . . according to the natures of the Seven Governors.” — 2:143 (Pymander, ii.23, 29)
Ases . . . means literally the “pillars of the world,” its “supports”
see: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “The new rulers, who called themselves Ases, i.e., pillars and supports of the world . . . began to create as Allfather willed that they should.” — p. 23
identical with . . . the “Seven Workmen or Rectors” . . . the seven Rishis
see: Gerald Massey, The Natural Genesis, 1883: “. . . the seven (the seven governors, also called the seven workmen . . . the seven Kabiri and seven Rishis) . . .” — 2:40
The Ases create the earth, the seas, the sky . . . from the remains of the slain giant Ymir
see: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “They made the earth of Ymir’s body, the sea of his sweat . . . Of his skull they made the firmament . . .” — pp. 23-4
they do not create Man, but only his form from the Ask or ash-tree
see: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “While wandering over the face of the earth . . . [the gods] found two human forms lying near the shore, Ask (the ash), and Embla (the alder), both of whom were without power or sense . . .” — p. 25
It is Odin who endows him with life and soul . . .
see: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “Odin gave them souls; Hönir, motion and the senses; and Lodur, blood . . . From these two are descended all the numerous races of men.” — p. 25
the Tzite tree . . . of which the Mexican third race of men was created
see: Max Müller, Chips From a German Workshop, 1867-75: “Then follows a third creation, man being made of a tree called tzité . . . They, too, did neither think nor speak . . . and they were likewise swept away by the waters and destroyed.” — 1:335
the Norse Yggdrasil, the Hindu Aswatha . . .
see: William Williamson, The Great Law, 1899: “The Rig Veda refers to ‘. . . the holy fig-tree which victorious priests surround.’  This is the sacred Aśwattha which represents the Tree in its cosmic aspect . . .”  “In Genesis the tree figures not only as the Tree of Life planted in the midst of the garden, but also as the Tree of Knowledge . . .”  “On the Scandinavian Mount Asgard . . . grew the tree Yggdrasil, whose roots were watered by the well of life . . .” — pp. 138, 141, 142
the Hellenic tree of life . . . and the Tibetan Zampun . . .
see: William Williamson, The Great Law, 1899: “It is a remarkable fact that in the Popol-Vuh of the Guatemalans, as well as in Hesiod and in the above Scandinavian story, the human race is described as produced from a tree — Hesiod agreeing with the Edda in calling it the Ash-tree.  In Thibet there is a legend of untold antiquity in which the great world-tree, there called Zampun, is described as stretching its three roots up to heaven and down to the nether regions.” — pp. 142-3
all those “Trees,” whether Pippala or Haoma . . . are the “plants of life”
see: Zend-Avesta, Part I, tr. James Darmesteter, 1880: “Because the Haoma is the plant of life; when strained for the sacrifice, it is the king of healing plants (Bund. XXIV) . . .” — p. 72 fn. (Vendidad, vi.4)
the great mundane macrocosmic tree
see: Plato, Works, v. 2, tr. Henry Davis, 1849: “. . . we are plants, not of earth, but heaven; and from the same source whence the soul first arose, a divine nature, raising aloft our head and root, directs our whole corporeal frame.” — p. 406 (Timæus, § 71)
the mystery is half revealed in the Dirghotamas
see: Max Müller, History of Ancient Sanskrit Literature, 1860: “. . . the old Ṛishi Dīrghatamas, whose hymns [the ‘Dirghatamas Hymns’] have likewise been preserved in the first maṇḍala of the Rig-veda.” — p. 57

— Footnotes

The tree, whatever it is . . .”
p/q: Zend-Avesta, Part I, tr. James Darmesteter, 1880: “Ahura Mazda answered: ‘God, O Spitama Zarathustra! towards that tree {The tree, whatever it is, from which the baresma is taken} . . .’ ” — p. 209 & fn. (Vendidad, xix.18)
      “The baresma . . . is a bundle of sacred twigs . . . which the Magi hold in their hand while reciting their hymns . . .” — pp. 22-3 fn. (Vendidad, iii.1)

— 97-8 —

“Pippala, the sweet fruit of that tree . . .”
p/q: F. de Rougement, Le Peuple Primitif, 1857: “. . . Dirghatamas parle d’un arbre mystique ‘le pippala’, dont le fruit est doux comme l’ambroisie.  Les esprits qui aiment la bonté viennent sur cet arbe; les dieux y produisent toutes leurs merveilles [Dirghatamas speaks of a mystical tree ‘the pippala,’ the fruit of which is sweet like ambrosia.  The spirits who love goodness come to that tree; the gods produce all their marvels there].” — 3:414

— 98 —

As in the Gogard, among the luxuriant branches . . . the “Serpent” dwells.
see: William Williamson, The Great Law, 1899: “ ‘At Dodona . . . Zeus was worshippped as immanent in the sacred oak . . .’  This sacred oak appears to have been known by the name of Gogard, and a serpent was supposed to dwell among its branches.” — p. 146
A sentence of imprisonment in the lower or nether regions
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “Origen held . . . all souls emanated from the Divine Nature long before the foundations of the world. . . . [some] Souls . . . were placed in this world . . . This was an imprisonment.” — pp. 308-9
which is our earth; the lowest in its chain
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘At the time that the Holy . . . created the world He created 7 heavens Above.  He created 7 earths Below . . .’ ”  “ ‘And the Lower earths where do they come from?  They are from the chain of the earth and from the Heaven above.’ {Zohar iii, 9b, 10a}.” — pp. 415, 416 & 417 fn.
(Vide Part II., “The Evil Spirit, who, or what?”)
see: “The Evil Spirit: Who, and What?” — SD 2:475-83
The Svastica . . . the “Jaina-Cross” as it is now called by the Masons
see: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Jaina Cross. . . . It is found alike in the Old World and the New: on the monuments of Egypt . . . the rock caverns of India . . . it is associated with the mediæval Rosicrucians, and perpetuated by the operative Guild-Masons on the cathedrals and fortresses of Central Europe.” — p. 351
its direct connection, and even identity with the Christian Cross
see: John P. Lundy, Monumental Christianity, 1876: “. . . I must . . . here introduce what I conceive to be a pagan type of Christ, viz., the Hindu Agni or god of fire, whose symbol is the oldest form of the cross known.  As this symbol was in general use in all the ancient pagan world from India to Italy, so it is found among the other forms of the cross in the Christian Catacombs at Rome . . .”
11   12  13
 “Nos. 11, 12, and 13, are examples of the symbol of Agni, called Swastica, found in the Roman Catacombs . . .” — pp. 14-15
“Does it not shine . . . on the thousand headed Sesha-Ananta, in the depths of Pâtâla . . .”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Below the seven Pātālas [infernal regions] is the form of Vishṇu, proceeding from the quality of darkness, which is called Śesha . . . This being is called Ananta by the spirits of heaven . . . He has a thousand heads, which are embellished with the pure and visible mystic sign {the Swastika} . . .” — 2:211 & fn. (ii.5)
The Svastica . . . is the summary in a few lines of the whole work of creation
see: Krishnashankar Lalshankar, “The Six-Pointed and Five-Pointed Stars,” Nov. 1881: “The idea of spirit and matter crossing and interlacing . . . has not been unknown to the Aryan mystics and philosophers; and, in fact, it is expressed by them by a cross, nay even more, by often turning and extending the extremities thus, cross1, cross2 . . . they have denoted the endlessness alike of the process of this multiplication and of the expansion of the great cosmos.” — p. 30 (The Theosophist, v. 3)

— 99 —

the humble moneron of materialistic science . . .
see: A. Wilford Hall, The Problem of Human Life, 1883: “I will follow Professor Haeckel back to that moneron . . . which he says is the ‘primeval parent of all other organisms,’ — that moneron . . . which accidentally varied and then transmitted its peculiarity, in some manner to mortals unknown, to some other moneron with additional improvements, — that to another and so on till a new and higher species of animals was developed.” — p. 399
the “Worker’s Hammer” . . . “which striketh sparks from the flint” . . .
p/q: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “. . . like as when the worker in stone striketh sparks from the flint with his hammer . . . these sparks which fly forth flame and scintillate, but shortly they are extinguished.  And these are called the Prior Worlds.” — p. 301 (Lesser Holy Assembly, x.422-3)
referred to in the “Book of Concealed Mystery” (Ch. I., §§ 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.)
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “For before the world was established Countenance beheld not Countenance {See “Book of Concealed Mystery,” ch. i. §§ 2, 3, 4, et. seq.}. . . . And therefore were the Prior Worlds [‘sparks’ from the ‘Worker’s Hammer’] destroyed.” — p. 301 & fn. (Lesser Holy Assembly, x.420-1)
      “. . . countenance beheld not countenance. . . . {Macroprosopus and Microprosopus} . . . And the kings of ancient time were dead . . . {they symbolize worlds of ‘unbalanced force’}.” — p. 43 & notes (Book of Concealed Mystery, i.2-3)
“Thor’s Hammer,” the magic weapon forged by dwarfs against the Giants
see: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “Thor . . . receives Miölnir, the storm-hammer, from the dwarfs who made it for him . . . [a giant steals it . . .] he gets back the stolen hammer from the mountain-giant Thrym, [and] destroys the whole race of giants in Thrymheim . . .” — p. 9
the Ases . . . having been purified by fire . . . become fit to dwell in Ida . . .
p/q: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “This was the Field of Ida . . . There the holy Ases were assembled; for they, like the world, had been purified by fire, and were now fitted to dwell in Ida in eternal peace.  The bonds of Hel could bind them no more, for the kingdom of evil had passed away . . .” — pp. 302, 305
“Surtur’s flames had not destroyed them . . .”
p/q: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “Surtur’s flames had not destroyed them, nor yet had the raging waters.  There were also Magni and Modi, the sons of Thor.  They brought Miölnir with them, not as a weapon of war, but as the instrument with which to consecrate the new heavens and the new earth.” — p. 305 (“The Renewal of the World”)
the “Hammer of Creation
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “From a Light-Bearer of insupportable brightness proceeded a Radiating {Compare this with Miölner, the hammer of Thor} Flame, dashing off like a vast and mighty hammer those sparks which were the Prior Worlds.” — p. 302 (Lesser Holy Assembly, x.429)
with its four arms bent at right angles . . . continual motion and revolution . . .
see: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Jaina Cross. . . . There is no limit to the extension of the arms . . . bent at right angles . . . It is an emblem of activity, as it typifies the continual revolution of the Earth upon its axis; and it also represents the four elements, which, in a mystical sense, constitute the fabric of the Earth.” — pp. 351, 352
In the Smaragdine Tablet of Hermes, the uplifted right hand is inscribed with the word “Solve”
see: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Considered as Man, it represents him in a humble sitting posture — one hand supporting the body on the ground, the other raised towards heaven . . . In this sense, it likewise refers to the Smaragdine Tablet of Hermes, and the upper arm should bear the [Latin] word Solve [‘dissolve’] and the lower one Coagula [‘combine’]. . . . The two hands, in their several positions, remind us that that which is above is as that which is below . . .” — p. 352

— 100 —

now degraded into the mallet . . . of the Grand Masters of Masonic Lodges
see: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “In Masonry, however, we find this hammer of Thor . . . has survived in the form of the mallet. . . . an emblematic pledge of a Master’s ownership over his Lodge.” — p. 353
the songs of the three Norse Goddesses
see: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “frigg and her maidens. . . . The goddess [Frigg] had three . . . attendants [aspects] always beside her, and with these she used to hold council on human affairs . . .” — pp. 96, 99
      “. . . Saga [an aspect of Frigg] . . . sang of the deeds of gods and heroes. . . . But her songs did not pass away without leaving a trace behind; some of them are probably preserved in the Edda . . .” — p. 48
to whom the ravens of Odin whisper of the past and the future . . .
p/q: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “. . . the great goddess Saga . . . dwelt in a house of crystal beneath the cool flowing river.  The eager enquirers . . . found the goddess sunk in dreamy thought, while Odin’s ravens fluttered around her, and whispered to her of the past and of the future.” — p. 1
written down in the “Scrolls of Wisdom”
see: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “[The goddess] pointed to the scrolls which were lying scattered around her, as she said: ‘Are ye come at last to seek intelligence of the wisdom and deeds of your ancestors?  I have written on these scrolls all that the people of that distant land thought and believed, and that which they held to be eternal truth.’ ” — p. 1
“on the field of Ida, the field of resurrection . . .”
p/q: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “On the Field of Ida, the field of resurrection, the sons of the highest gods assembled, and in them their fathers rose again.  They talked together of the Past and the Present, and remembered the wisdom and prophecies of their ancestors which had all been fulfilled.  Near them, but unseen by them, was the strong, the mighty One who rules all things . . . and ordains the eternal laws that govern the world.” — p. 305
“They all knew he was there, they felt his presence . . .”
p/q: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “They all knew he was there, they felt his presence and his power, but were ignorant of his name.  At his command the new earth rose out of the waters.  To the south, above the Field of Ida, he made another heaven called Audlang, and further off, a third, known as Widblain.  Over Gimil’s cave a wondrous palace was erected, which was covered with gold and shone brighter than the sun.” — p. 305
From Gimil’s heights . . . they looked down upon the happy descendants . . .
p/q: W. Wägner, Asgard and the Gods, 1880: “From Gimil’s heights they looked down upon the happy descendants of Lif and signed to them to climb up higher, to rise in knowledge and wisdom . . . step by step, from one heaven to another, until they were at last fit to be united to the divinities in the house of the Allfather.” — p. 305

— 100-1 —

the myth of Prometheus. . . . examined further on in the light of the Hindu Pramanthâ
see: “Prometheus, the Titan: His Origin in Ancient India,” SD 2:519-28.

— 101 —

the Divine babe, Agni . . . is born from the conjunction of Pramanthâ and Arani (Svastica)
see: Nicolas Joly, Man Before Metals, 1883: “The lighting stick or pramanthā . . . The stick was turned in a little hollow formed at the point of intersection of two pieces of wood placed one above the other in the form of a cross, and of which the extremities bent at right angles were firmly fixed by four bronze nails.  The whole apparatus was called Swastika . . . the Pramanthā whose friction produced the divine child Agni, in Latin Ignis.” — pp. 189-90
Twashtri (Viswakarman) is the “divine artist and carpenter” . . .
see: Nicolas Joly, Man Before Metals, 1883: “The father of the sacred fire bore the name of Twastri, that is, the divine carpenter . . .” — p. 190
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “TWASHṬṚI.  In the Ṛig-veda this deity is the ideal artist, the divine artisan . . . He is the beautiful . . . archetype of all forms . . . He created Brahmanaspati [father of the gods] above all creatures, and generated Agni along with heaven and earth . . . In the Purāṇas Twashṭṛi is identified with Viśwakarman, the artisan of the gods . . .” — pp. 323-4
discs, called fusaiolos . . . found by Dr. Schliemann under the ruins of ancient Troy . . .
see: Nicolas Joly, Man Before Metals, 1883: “It is a remarkable fact that the Swastica of India swa3 occurs often in these two forms swa4 or swa5 upon the fusaïoles or terra-cotta discs found in such abundance by Dr. Schliemann under the ruins of ancient Troy.  Hence the natural conclusion that the Trojans were of Aryan race.” — p. 190 fn.
Sanjna . . . is shown retiring . . . leaving behind to her husband her Chhaya
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Sanjnā . . . was the wife of the Sun . . . Unable to endure the fervours of her lord, Sanjnā gave him Chhāyā {her shadow, or image} . . . and repaired to the forests, to practise devout exercises.” — 3:20 & fn. (iii.2)

— Footnotes

The “Father of the Sacred Fire . . . is Twashtri . . . his mother was Maya. . . .”
p/q: Nicolas Joly, Man Before Metals, 1883: “The father of the sacred fire bore the name of Twashtri . . . His mother was named Maya.  He himself was styled Akta (anointed, χριστὸς) after the priests had poured upon his head the spirituous Sôma, and on his body butter purified by sacrifice.” — p. 190
Adalbert Kühn, in his “Die Herabkunft des Feuers,” identifies the two signs . . .
p/q: Nicolas Joly, Man Before Metals, 1883: “In his interesting work upon the origin of fire (‘Die Herabkunft des Feuers’) Adalbert Kühn always designates the swa1 and this other similar sign swa2 by the name of arani . . . He adds: ‘This process of kindling fire naturally led man to the idea of sexual reproduction.’ ” — p. 190
Agni, in the condition of Akta, or anointed, is suggestive of Christ” . . .
p/q: Nicolas Joly, Man Before Metals, 1883: “Agni, in the condition of Akta or anointed, is suggestive of Christ; Maya, Mary His mother; Twastri, Saint Joseph, the carpenter of the Bible.” — p. 190 fn.
In the Rig Veda, Viswakarman is the highest and oldest of the Gods and their “Father.”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “. . . Viśwa-karmā was the great architect of the universe, and is described in two hymns of the Ṛig-veda as the one ‘all-seeing god . . . the father, generator, disposer, who knows all worlds, gives the gods their names, and is beyond the comprehension of mortals.’ ” — p. 363

— 102 —

The fathers (Barhishad . . .) call to their help . . . (the Kavyavâhana . . .)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The progenitors (Pitṛis) . . . the Agnishwāttas and Barhishads . . . the latter possessed of, fires {Kavyavāhana, the fire of the Pitṛis}.” — 1:156 & fn. (i.10)
Thus primitive man was . . . only a senseless Bhûta or a “phantom.”
see: Stanza IV, 17-21: “. . . men, during the first and the second races, were not physical beings, but merely rudiments of the future men: Bhūtas . . .” — SD 2:108
      “The first race of men were, then, simply the images, the astral doubles, of their Fathers . . .”  “How could these Chhayas reproduce themselves . . . since they were ethereal, a-sexual, and even devoid, as yet, of the vehicle of desire . . .” — SD 2:115, 116
      “The ‘shadows,’ or Chhayas, are called the sons of the ‘self-born’ . . .”  “. . . the First Race was simply composed of the astral shadows of the creative progenitors, having of course neither astral nor physical bodies of their own . . .” — SD 2:120, 121
the progeny of Pârvaka and Suchi are the animal electric and solar fires
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Pāvaka is electric or Vaidyuta fire . . . Śuchi is solar (Saura) fire. . . . Kavyavāhana, the fire of the Pitṛis . . .” — 1:156 fn.

— Footnotes

“Bhûtas — fiends, frightful from being monkey-coloured . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The creator of the world, being incensed, then created fierce beings, who were denominated goblins, Bhūtas (malignant fiends), and eaters of flesh {These creatures were ‘fiends, frightful from being monkey-coloured, and carnivorous’}.” — 1:83 & fn. (i.5)
Bhûtas” . . . in esoteric teaching, it means elementary substances
see: Sānkhya Kārikā and The Bhāshya, tr. Colebrooke & Wilson, 1837: “. . . the creation of bhūtas . . . or elemental creation . . .” — p. 163 (§ 53 cm.)

— 103 —

(Vide infra, “The Secret of Satan.”)
see: Stanza X, 39: “The true esoteric view about ‘Satan’ . . . is admirably brought out in an appendix, entitled ‘The Secret of Satan,’ to the second edition of Dr. A. Kingsford’s ‘Perfect Way.’ . . . ‘1.  And on the seventh day . . . there went forth from the presence of God a mighty Angel . . . and God gave him the dominion of the outermost sphere {Our earth and the physical plane of consciousness}.’ ”
      “ ‘. . . Upon Satan only is the shame of generation.  He hath lost his virginal estate (so hath the Kumāra by incarnating): uncovering heavenly secrets, he hath entered into bondage. . . . He compasseth with bonds and limits all things.’ ” — SD 2:233 & fn., 235 (The Perfect Way, Appendix 15, “The Secret of Satan”)
“Son of the Father” . . . partook of the nature . . . of the Seven Governors
see: Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1884: “For the Mind being God . . . brought forth by his Word another Mind or Workman; which . . . formed seven other Governors . . .”  “But the Father of all things . . . brought forth Man like unto himself . . . he considered the Operations and Workmanships of the Seven; but they loved him, and every one made him partaker of his own order.” — pp. 9, 10 (Poemander, §§ 13, 18, 20)
“peeped through the Harmony and, breaking through the Seven Circles . . .”
p/q: Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1884: “And he [Man] . . . partaking their Nature, resolved to pierce and break through the Circumference of the Circles, and to understand the power of him that sits upon the Fire.  And having . . . peeped through the Harmony, and breaking through the strength of the Circles, so shewed and made manifest the downward-born Nature . . .” — pp. 10-11 (Poemander, §§ 21-2)
allegorical accounts about the “Wars in Heaven” . . .
see: George Smith, Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “ ‘We are told, in the [Chaldean] inscriptions, of the fall of the celestial being who appears to correspond to Satan.  In his ambition he raises his hand against the sanctuary of the God of heaven . . .’ ”  “ ‘This rebellion leads to a war in heaven and the conquest of the powers of evil . . .’ ”  “This war between the powers of good and evil, chaos and order . . . finds its parallel in the war between Michael and the dragon in Revelation, xii. . . .” — pp. 14, 99-100
including that of Revelation with respect to . . . the fallen angels
see: George Smith, Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “ ‘. . . the brief narration given in the Pentateuch omits a number of incidents . . . as to the origin of evil, the fall of the angels . . . Such points as these are included in the Cuneiform narrative . . .’ ”  “. . . the war between Michael and the dragon in Revelation, xii. . . . This description is strikingly like the impression gathered from the fragments of the cuneiform story; the dragon Tiamat who fought against the gods and led man to sin, and whose fate it was to be conquered in a celestial war, closely corresponds in all essential points to the dragon conquered by Michael.” — pp. 14, 99-100

— 104 —

“My first idea of this part . . . was that the wars . . . preceded the Creation . . .”
p/q: George Smith, Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “My first idea of this part was that the war with the powers of evil preceded the Creation; I now think it followed the account of the Fall . . .” — p. 92
an engraving . . . of the Sacred Tree, the Serpent, man and woman . . .
see: George Smith, Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “One striking and important specimen of early type in the British Museum collection has two figures sitting one on each side of a tree, holding out their hands to the fruit, while at the back of one is stretched a serpent. . . .
Sacred Tree
Sacred Tree, Seated Figure on each side, and serpent in background, from an early babylonian cylinder.” — pp. 90, 91
“The Dragon . . . which in the Chaldean account of the creation leads men to sin . . .”
p/q: George Smith, Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “The dragon which, in the Chaldean account of the Creation, leads men to sin, is the creature of Tiamat, the living principle of the sea and of chaos . . . which was opposed to the deities at the creation of the world.” — p. 91
The Dragon is . . . “an embodiment of the Spirit of Chaos”
p/q: George Smith, Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “The dragon . . . is an embodiment of the spirit of chaos . . .” — p. 91
“It is clear that the Dragon is included in the curse for the Fall . . .”
p/q: George Smith, Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “It is clear that the dragon is included in the curse for the Fall, and that the gods invoke on the head of the human race all the evils which afflict humanity.  Wisdom and knowledge shall injure him (line 22), he shall have family quarrels (line 23), shall submit to tyranny (line 24), he will anger the gods (line 25) . . . he shall be disappointed in his desires (line 27), he shall pour out useless prayer (lines 28 and 30) . . . he shall commit future sin (line 32).” — p. 91 (“Babylonian Legend of Creation”)
“No doubt subsequent lines continue this topic . . .”
p/q: George Smith, Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “No doubt subsequent lines continue these topics, but again our narrative is broken, and it only reopens where the gods are preparing for war with the powers of evil, which are led by Tiamat . . .” — pp. 91-2

— 105 —

even in chemistry hydrogen “would be the only existing form of matter . . .”
p/q: William Crookes, “Genesis of the Elements,” March 4, 1887: “The first-born element, would, in its simplicity, be most nearly allied to protyle [primordial substance].  This is hydrogen . . . For some time hydrogen would be the only existing form of matter (in our sense of the term).” — p. 97 (Chemical News, v. 55)
Godfrey Higgins . . . compared Hydrogen to . . . the To on, the “One”
p/q: Godfrey Higgins, Anacalypsis, 1836: “Was it hydrogen?  This Gas . . . is what the ancient materialists . . . considered to be the substance of the First Cause. . . . Then in what will hydrogen differ from the Το Ον [The One]?” — 2:336

— 105-6 —

Hydrogen is not Water . . . is not fire . . . nor is it Air . . .
p/q: Godfrey Higgins, Anacalypsis, 1836: “It is not water, though the base of water, — it is not fire, though the base of fire.  It is not air, though air or gas arises from the union of its two products . . . These first three constituted the first Trinity.  From these, three in one, emanated the next Trinity, consisting of fire, water, air or gas, in their most refined forms . . .” — 2:336

— 106 —

the Kabeiri . . . Some say that there were three or four only; others say seven.
see: Herodotus, History, tr. George Rawlinson, 1862: “Herodotus mentions the Egyptian Cabiri at Memphis . . . the three names he had agree with the supposed number of the Cabiri of Samothrace.” — 2:81 fn.
see: Gerald Massey, The Natural Genesis, 1883: “. . . for he [man] having the nature of the harmony of the seven (the seven governors, also called . . . the seven Kabiri and seven Rishis) . . .” — 2:40
Aschieros, Achiosersa, Achiochersus, and Camillus
see: Paul Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “. . . les noms mystiques de trois des Cabires de Samothrace: Axieros, Axiokersa, Axiokersos . . . Un quatrième personnage . . . portait le nom Cadmos ou Casmilos [the mystical names of three of the Kabiri of Samothrace: Axieros, Axiokersa, Axiokersos . . . A fourth personage . . . had the name Cadmus or Camilus] . . .” — p. 270
the four Kumâras — Sanat-Kumâra, Sananda, Sanaka, and Sanâtana
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “KUMĀRAS.  Mind-born sons of Brahmā . . . There were four of them, Sanat-kumāra, Sananda, Sanaka, and Sanātana . . .” — p. 170
The former deities . . . were often confounded with the Dioscuri, Corybantes, Anaces, etc.
p/q: J. Lemprière, Bibliotheca Classica, 1833: “These deities are often confounded with the Corybantes, Anaces, Dioscuri, &c. and, according to Herodotus, Vulcan was their father.” — 1:294
just as the Kumâra, whose reputed father is Brahmâ
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “KUMĀRAS.  Mind-born sons of Brahmā, who, declining to create progeny, remained ever boys and ever pure and innocent.” — p. 170
the “Flame of his Wrath” . . . prompted him to perform the . . . Kumâra creation . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Sanandana and the other sons of Brahmā [the Kumāras] . . . were without desire or passion . . . and undesirous of progeny.  This when Brahmā perceived, he was filled with wrath . . . the flame of which invested, like a garland, heaven, earth, and hell.  Then from his forehead . . . sprang Rudra . . .” — 1:100-3 (i.7)
resulting in Rudra or Nilalohita (Siva) and the Kumâras
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “But there is a ninth, the Kaumāra creation {the creation of Rudra or Nīlalohita, a form of Śiva, by Brahmā . . . and of certain other mind-born sons of Brahmā} . . .” — 1:76-7 & fn. (i.5)
These physical senses pertain even to a lower creation
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The first creation was that of Mahat or Intellect . . . The second was that of the rudimental principles . . . The third was the modified form of egotism . . . or creation of the senses . . .” — 1:74 (i.5)
Pratisarga, or secondary Creation
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “chapter iv. . . . The lower spheres of the universe restored.  Creation renewed. . . . {This creation is of the secondary order, or Pratisarga}.” — 1:55 & fn. (i.4)

— 107 —

Bath-Kol is the daughter of the Divine Voice
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “The Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “The first (Alhim, Elohim) is like the Hebrew letters, which are the frame-work for sound or speech, but are dead without the use of the living vowels, or the Spirit, the Bath Col, or Daughter of the Voice.” — p. 259 (Masonic Review, 65:5)
Vâch was called . . . the “Mother of the Vedas”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “VĀCH.  ‘Speech.’ . . . In the Taittirīya Brāhmaṇa, she is called ‘the mother of the Vedas’ . . .” — p. 329
“I am thy Thought, thy God, more ancient than the moist principle . . .”
p/q: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes Trismegistus, tr. J. D. Chambers, 1882: “ ‘I am Mind, thy God, Who is before moist nature, that which appeared out of darkness; but The luminous Word {λόγος} out of Mind, Son of God.’ ” — pp. 2-3 & fn. (Poemandres, i.6)
All proceeds from Prabhavâpyaya . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “That chief principle (Pradhāna) . . . is called, by the sages, also Prakṛiti (nature): it is . . . the mother of the world; without beginning; and that into which all that is produced is resolved {Prabhavāpyaya, ‘the place whence is the origination and into which is the resolution of all things’}.” — 1:20-1 & fn. (i.2)
appellations given to Vishnu . . . he is called Pûrvaja, “pregenetic” . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “In this stanza occurs a series of the appellations of Vishṇu . . . Pūrvaja . . . produced or appearing before creation; the Orphic πρωτόγονος.” — 1:2-3 fn. (i.2)

— 108 —

First Cause is called . . . Jagad-Yoni, “the womb of the world”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The chief principle (Pradhāna), which is . . . the mother of the world . . . {Jagad-yoni . . . ‘the mother of the world’, or ‘the womb of the world’}.” — 1:20, 21 fn. (i.2)
Bhûtadi, “origin” . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “From the great principle (Mahat) . . . and Bhūtādi, ‘rudimental’ {‘origin of the elements’}, is produced; the origin of the (subtile) elements . . .” — 1:32-4 & fn. (i.2)
from Prabhavâpyaya, “the place whence is the origination . . . of all things”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . into which all that is produced is resolved {Prabhavāpyaya, ‘the place whence is the origination and into which is the resolution of all things’}.  By that principle all things were invested . . . prior to creation.” — 1:20-3 & fn. (i.2)
called the incognizable, eternal Brahma
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘The indiscrete cause . . . is the uncognizable Brahma, who was before all’ . . .” — 1:21 fn.
the Punda-Rikaksha, “supreme and imperishable glory”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Puṇḍarīkāksha . . . Puṇḍarīka is explained supreme glory, and Aksha, imperishable.” — 1:2 fn.
Sadaika-Rupa, “changeless” or “immutable” Nature
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “This address to Vishṇu pursues the notion that he, as the supreme being, is one, whilst he is all.  He is Avikāra, not subject to change: Sadaikarūpa, one invariable nature . . .” — 1:14-15 fn. (i.2)
he is addressed as Ekanaka-Rupa, “both single and manifold” . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . to him whose essence is both single and manifold . . . {Ekānekarūpa}.  Glory to the supreme Vishṇu, the cause of the creation, existence, and end of this world . . .” — 1:14-15 & fn. (i.2)
his names, if placed in esoteric order, show . . . Mahapurusha or Paramatman . . . Supreme Spirit
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Vishṇu is described by . . . Paramātman . . . supreme spirit, or Mahāpurusha . . .” — 1:3 fn.
Atman or Pûrvaja . . . The living Spirit of Nature.
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Ātman . . . living soul, animating nature and existing before it, or Pūrvaja.” — 1:3 fn.
Indriyâtman, or Hrishikesa . . . (One with the senses).
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Indriyātman . . . one with the senses, or Hṛishīkeśa . . .” — 1:3 fn.
Bhutâtman . . . The living, or Life Soul.
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Bhūtātman . . . one with created things . . .” — 1:3 fn.
Kshetrajna . . . Embodied soul, or the Universe of Spirit and Matter
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Kshetrajna, ‘embodied spirit’, or that which knows the Kshetra or ‘body’; implying the combination of spirit with form or matter, for the purpose of creating.” — 1:29 fn.
Bhrântidarsanatah . . . False perception — Material Universe. . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . who is in all created things . . . and who is known, through false appearances, by the nature of visible objects {Bhrāntidarśanatah . . . ‘false appearances’ . . . That is, visible objects are not what they seem to be, independent existences; they are essentially one with their original source}.” — 1:15-16 & fn. (i.2)

— 109 —

the Tabula Smaragdina . . . The “One thing” mentioned
see: The Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1884: “The following is cited as the inscription of the ‘Smaragdine Table’ . . . What is below, is like that which is above; and what is above, is like that which is below: to accomplish the miracle of one thing.” — p. ix
see: Five Treatises on the Philosophers Stone, “The Smaragdine Table,” 1652: “. . . the matter of this worke . . . is one only thing, containing in it selfe all necessaries to the accomplishing of its own perfection.” — p. 2 (Introduction to “The Smaragdine Table”)
“The Father of that one only thing is the Sun; its Mother the Moon . . .”
p/q: Five Treatises on the Philosophers Stone, “The Smaragdine Table,” 1652: “. . . all things have sprung from this one thing . . . His Father is the Sun, his Mother is the Moone, the Winde bore it in her belly, the Earth is his Nurse . . .” — p. 3

— 110 —

to live a Senseless life (Tanha)
see: Vinaya Texts, Part I, tr. T. W. Rhys Davids & H. Oldenberg, 1881: “Then the Blessed One . . . fixed his mind upon the Chain of Causation {the four Noble Truths simply reduce the origin of suffering to Thirst, or Desire (Taṇhā), in its threefold form, thirst for pleasure, thirst for existence, thirst for prosperity . . . What does taṇhā come from? . . . avijjā (Ignorance)} . . .” — p. 75 (Mahāvagga, I:i.2)
which is “the maker of the tabernacle”
p/q: Dhammapada, tr. F. Max Müller, 1881: “Looking for the maker of this tabernacle, I shall have to run through a course of many births, so long as I do not find (him); and painful is birth again and again.” — p. 42 (xi.153, 154)
nous or Mind . . . reigns over the animal ego . . . the animal or physical impedes it . . .
see: Plato, Works, v. 5, tr. George Burges, 1852: “. . . that body is posterior and secondary, as being . . . ruled over by the ruling soul.”  “. . . and all that Soul makes use of . . . she ever takes as an ally Mind, a god {Νοῦς [higher ego]} . . . but when Not-Mind {Ἄνοια [irrational ego]}, it works out every thing the contrary.” — pp. 426, 427 & fns. (The Laws, x.8)

— 111 —

the “Chaldean Book of Numbers
see: A. E. Waite, Doctrine and Literature of the Kabalah, 1902: “. . . Kabalistic books once indisputably in existence, but now lost.  Of such is the Chaldæan Book of Numbers {said to be much superior to the Zohar} . . .” — p. 436 & fn.
First comes En-Soph, the “Concealed of the Concealed,” then the Point . . .
see: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “At first En Soph . . . sent forth from his infinite light one spiritual substance, the first Sephira . . . The Primordial Point . . .” — p. 404
      “ ‘When the Concealed of all the Concealed wanted to reveal himself, he first made a point (i.e., the first Sephira), shaped it into a sacred form (i.e., the whole of the Sephiroth) . . .’ ” — p. 410 (Zohar, i.2a)
then the Atzilatic World, a World of Emanations that gives birth to three other worlds . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “These Sephiroth, or the World of Emanations . . . or the Atzilatic World, gave birth to three other worlds: — (1.) The World of Creation . . . also called the Throne . . . the abode of pure spirits . . .” — p. 409
the second, the World of Formation . . . habitat of the Angels . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “(2.) the World of Formation, or the Jetziratic World . . . the habitation of the angels . . . which sent forth (3.) the World of Action . . .” — p. 409
World of Action . . . Kliphoth, containing the . . . Spheres . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “(3.) the World of Action, or the Assiatic World . . . also called the World of Keliphoth . . . containing the Spheres ( גלגלים ) and Matter, the residence of the Prince of Darkness . . .” — p. 409
Metatron, the Angel of the second or Briatic World, means Messenger ἂγγελος . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “The angel of the second or Briatic World is Metatron . . . Metatron signifies ἀγγελος, messenger, and by some he is called Great Teacher.” — p. 410
under him are the Angels of the third World . . . “they inhabit and vivify this world . . .”
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Under him are the angels of the Jetziratic World, in which the ten Sephiroth are divided into ten orders. . . . These angels inhabit or vivify this world as essential intelligences, and their correlates and logical contraries inhabit the third habitable world, called the Assiatic . . .” — p. 410
These . . . are called “the Shells” . . . or demons, who inhabit the seven habitations . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “. . . they are called the shells ( קליפות ) or demons . . . They are provided with suitable miserable habitations . . . These seven habitations are called Sheba Hachaloth . . .” — p. 410
Their prince is called in the Kabala Samael, the Angel of Death . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “The chief governor is a prince, called by the Kabbalah Samaël . . . the angel of poison or death.  He was the seducing serpent Satan.” — p. 411
Lucifer, the bright angel of Light, the Light and Life-bringer
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “I Jesus . . . am the root and the offspring of David, and the bright and morning star [Lucifer].” — p. 340 (Revelation, xxii.16)
see: James Comper Gray, The Biblical Museum, 1871: “Lucifer. — There is no name we know so abused and misapplied as this truly beautiful name.  Lucifer, the light-bringer, is the Latin equivalent of the Greek Phosphoros . . . to which corresponds the phrase, ‘Bright and Morning Star’ . . . for He is the true light who enlightens every man who cometh into the world . . .” — 2:98
“The Souls . . . are pre-existent in the world of Emanations,” (Book of Wisdom, viii., 20)
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “All souls are pre-existent in the Worlds of Emanations; a belief also found in the Book of Wisdom (viii. 20) . . .” — p. 412
see: The Book of Wisdom, ed. W. J. Deane, 1881: “. . . being good, I came into a body undefiled.” — p. 69 (viii.20)
      “From this passage it is inferred that the author believed in the pre-existence of souls . . . The doctrine is found in the Talmud . . . and in the Kabbalah.  According to this all souls pre-exist in the World of Emanations . . .” — p. 157 (viii.20 cm.)
the Zohar teaches that in the “Soul” “is the real man . . .”
see: Christian D. Ginsburg, The Kabbalah, 1865: “ ‘That which constitutes the real man is the soul, and those things which are called the skin, the flesh, the bones, and the veins . . . these are the outer garments, for the inward part is the deep mystery of the heavenly man.’ . . . (Sohar, ii, 42 a.).  The souls of all these epitomies of the universe are pre-existent in the World of Emanations . . .” — pp. 30-1
“They descend from the pure air to be chained to bodies
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “. . . Josephus . . . says (De Bell. Jud. ii. 12), that the Essenes believed ‘that souls were immortal, and that they descended from the pure air . . . to be chained to bodies’ . . .” — p. 412
“The air is full of Souls . . . they descend to be tied to mortal bodies . . .”
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “. . . [this] doctrine is repeated by Philo.  ‘The air was full of them . . . descending to be tied to mortal bodies . . . being desirous to live in them’ (De Gignat. p. 222c; De Somniis, p. 455d.).” — p. 412
they will become progressive beings . . . transcending the faculties of the Angels
see: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “This new being, man, was created with faculties far transcending those of the angels, being of a progressive and not intransitive nature.” — p. 411
it is the Brahmin, the twice-born, who rules the gods or devas
see: Richard S. Storrs, The Divine Origin of Christianity, 1884: “Under the Brahmanic system . . . the highest place among men belonged to those supposed to have power over the gods through prayer and sacrifice . . . it was the abstracted contemplating intelligence of the men twice-born, who entered thus into conference with the Absolute . . .” — p. 74

— 112 —

“Know ye not that we (the Initiates) shall judge angels”?
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “Do ye not know that the saints shall judge the world? . . . Know ye not that we shall judge angels? . . .” — p. 223 (1 Corinthians, 6:2-3)
see: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Even in the present form, the righteous take precedence of the angels . . . as it is said in the Talmud . . . with which may be compared the New Testament assertion — ‘Know ye not that we shall judge angels?  how much more things that pertain to this life?’ (1 Cor. vi. 3).” — p. 412
“The Soul and the Form when descending on Earth put on an earthly garment”
p/q: Christian D. Ginsburg, The Kabbalah, 1865: “Since the form of the body as well as the soul, is made after the image of the Heavenly Man, a figure of the forthcoming body which is to clothe the newly descending soul, is sent down from the celestial regions . . .”  “ ‘. . . the soul, when sent to this earth, puts on an earthly garment . . .’ ” — pp. 34, 38
His protoplastic body was not formed of that matter of . . . our mortal frames . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Nor were the protoplastic bodies formed of that matter of which our mortal frames are constituted.” — p. 411
“When Adam dwelt in the garden of Eden, he was clothed in the celestial garment . . .
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “ ‘When Adam dwelled in the garden of Eden, he was dressed in the celestial garment which is a garment of heavenly light. . . . light of that light which was used in the garden of Eden’ (ii. 229b).” — p. 411
“Man (the heavenly Adam) was created by the ten Sephiroth . . .”
p/q: Royal Masonic Cyclopædia, ed. Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, 1877: “Man was at length created by the ten Sephiroth (the Heavenly Adam), and they engendered by common power the earthly Adam.” — p. 411
“The devas cast no shadows”
see: Zend-Avesta, Part I, tr. James Darmesteter, 1880: “In India, gods have no shadows . . . in Persia, Rāshidaddīn was recognized to be a god from his producing no shadow . . .” — p. xliii fn. (Vendidad, Introduction)

— Footnotes

vegetation is shown . . . before “the heavens and the Earth were created”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens.  And every plant of the field before it was in the earth . . .” — p. 2 (Genesis, 2:4-5)
see: Thomas Griffith, Behind the Veil, 1876: “And it is this series of transient forms . . . which the Scripture writers have in mind when they speak, not simply of ‘the world,’ but of ‘the worlds’ . . . Nor are the changes which perpetually occur in the phenomena of each world the results of these phenomena themselves.  They must be ascribed to . . . the working of invisible elements antecedent to them; whence it is declared that ‘the Lord God made every plant of the field before it was in the earth’ . . .” — pp. 29-30
“there went up a mist from the Earth” and watered the whole face of the Earth
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.” — p. 3 (Genesis, 2:6)
Adam Kadmon, “the male and female being” of Genesis, ch.1
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “So God created man in his own image . . . male and female created he them.” — p. 2 (Genesis, 1:27)
      “In the day that God created man . . . male and female created he them; and blessed them, and called their name Adam . . .” — p. 6 (Genesis, 5:1-2)
Adam Kadmon . . . the host of the Elohim
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘. . . the Supreme Deity . . . [created] a mysterious and holy Form {The totality of all the Sephiroth . . . also called Adam Qadmon . . . in whom were the perfect models of all forms}; finally It covered this (Ideal) Form, with a rich and shining (visible) garment; that is, the entire universe, of which, the name necessarily enters into the Name of Elohim.’ ” — p. 128 & fn.

— 112-13 —

Hydrogen . . . its trinitarian latent nature is mirrored . . . in man
see: Godfrey Higgins, Anacalypsis, 1836: “. . . the substance which we call hydrogen, by which is meant a substance which is the base of both water and fire . . . But here we may perceive the corporeal trinity of Plato. . . . From the first [the one] . . . emanated the base of hydrogen . . . [from] the base of hydrogen, emanated hydrogen, the base of fire and water.  These first three constituted the first Trinity.  From these, three in one, emanated the next Trinity, consisting of fire, water, air or gas, in their most refined forms . . . and from these emanated all beings . . .” — 2:336

— 113 —

“The Superior agrees with the Inferior . . .”
p/q: Alfred C. Garratt, Myths in Medicine, 1884: “ ‘The Smaragdine Table of Hermes, whence all Alchymie did arise. . . . That which is inferior, is as that which is superior; and that which is superior, is as that which is inferior, for the accomplishing of the miricles by one . . . so all things have proceeded from one . . .’ ” — p. 162
see: The Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1884: “What is below, is like that which is above; and what is above, is like that which is below: to accomplish the miracle of one thing.” — p. ix
the secret work of . . . Hiram in the Kabala
see: J. D. Buck, Mystic Masonry, 1897: “. . . the old philosophy (Kabalah) teaches that the Immortal Spirit of man is the artificer of the body and its source of life . . . It is Christos, or Hiram, the Mediator between the Soul, or physical man, and the Universal Spirit . . .” — p. 102
“one in essence, but three in aspect”
see: J. D. Buck, Mystic Masonry, 1897: “This is the oldest ‘Trinity’ known to man . . . Christos is called the Word, but is not Ain Soph.  Atma in man represents Ain Soph in Cosmos. . . . they are one in essence.” — pp. 163-4
the Universal Agent or Lapis Philosophorum
see: A. E. Waite, The Mysteries of Magic, 1886: “. . . the philosphers’ stone [Lapis Philosophorum] . . . This stone, say the masters in alchemy, is the true salt of the philosophers, which is the . . . true philosophical agent . . . This stone is the foundation of absolute philosophy . . . the doctrine of universal harmonies by the sympathy of contrary things. . . . we must possess that reason which is the touchstone of truth. . . . To find the absolute in the infinite, the indefinite, and the finite, such is the magnum opus of the sages . . .” — pp. 198-9 (“Writings of Éliphas Lévi”)
To on . . . the one “whom no person has seen except the Son”
p/q: Godfrey Higgins, Anacalypsis, 1836: “. . . the highest . . . philosophy was a knowledge of Πατηρ αγνωστος [the unknown Father], called by Plato Το Ον [the One], whom no person has seen except the son . . .” — 1:814
“We say four elements, my Son . . .”
see: Thrice-Greatest Hermes, tr. & cm. G. R. S. Mead, 1906: “Of living things, my son, some are made friends with fire, and some with water, some with air, and some with earth . . . It is because . . . the elements doth form their bodies . . . Each soul, accordingly, while it is in its body is weighted and constricted by these four.” — 3:133-4 (Virgin of the World – II, §§ 49-50)
“. . . but ought to say three”
see: Thrice-Greatest Hermes, tr. & cm. G. R. S. Mead, 1906: “Straightway this Nature fell from one into three . . . The primal elements were not our mixed earth, water, fire, and air . . . these souls . . . were a blend of the three: spirit, knowing fire, and unknowing air, — triads, yet a unity . . .” — 3:137-8 (Virgin of the World – II, Commentary, §§ 7, 8)
Sulphur . . . Hydrargyum . . . Sal
see: Franz Hartmann, The Life of Paracelsus, 1887: “The invisible element or basic principle of all substances . . . may be either a solid (earthly), liquid (watery), gaseous (airy), or ethereal (fiery) state . . .”  “The combination of a body out of its three constituent principles, [is] represented by salt [sal], sulphur, and mercury [hydrargyrum], or body, soul, and spirit; respectively the elements of earth, water, and fire.” — pp. 33, 34
Flamma . . . Natura . . . Mater
see: The Hermetic Museum [1678], ed. A. E. Waite, 1893: “This Matter is . . . the universal Magnesia . . . [it] cannot be consumed by fire.  For itself is the universal and sparkling flame of the light of Nature . . .” — 1:77-8 (The Sophic Hydrolith, II)
      “Thou art the Architect; thou knowest the glorious properties of the Matter.”  “Only one substance is required, which contains within itself air, water, and fire . . . Therefore, thou, Nature, art the first mother, since thou dost cunningly combine the four elements . . .” — 1:135, 136 (A Demonstration of Nature)
Spiritus . . . Aqua . . . Sanguis
see: Hexaglot Bible, 1901: “Et tres sunt qui testimonium dant in terra.  Spiritus et aqua et sanguis, et hi tres unum sunt [There are three that bear witness in earth, the Spirit and the water and the blood, and these three are one].” — 6:788 (1 John, 5:8)
see: Jamieson, Fausset & Brown, Commentary: on the Old and New Testaments, 1884: “. . . the three things (the Spirit, the water, and the blood) are symbols of the Trinity. . . . ‘Of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, it is written, “And these three are one” (a unity).’ ”— 2:486

— 114 —

All is fire . . . the All in nature and its mind.
see: Morals and Dogma of Freemasonry, comp. Albert Pike, 1871: “ ‘All things are the progeny of one fire. . . . The Soul, being a bright fire . . . fills up the recesses of the world. . . . for the framer of the fiery world is the mind of mind, who first sprang from mind, clothing fire with fire.’ ” — p. 611
Pro-Mater is divine fire.
see: Liddell & Scott, Greek-English Lexicon, 1852: “Προμήτωρ . . . προμάτωρ . . . first mother . . . formed like προπάτωρ [first father] . . .” — p. 1256
see: The Hermetic Museum [1678], ed. A. E. Waite, 1893: “We also spoke of the ‘fire of the Sages’ . . . that it was an essential, preternatural, and Divine fire . . . planted in our souls by Nature . . .” — p. 108 (The Sophic Hydrolith, IV)
      “nature (speaks). . . . Follow me, that am the mother of all things created, which have one essence . . .”  “For this is the most excellent substance of the Sages . . . Transmute the elements . . . kindle the fire of the Sages . . .”  “Therefore, thou, Nature, art the first mother, since thou dost cunningly combine the four elements into an essence . . .” — pp. 1:123, 131, 133, 136 (A Demonstration of Nature)
from agni . . . to the Jewish god who “is a consuming fire”
see: Robert Brown, “The Religion of Zoroaster,” April 21, 1879: “. . . [the Aryan] knew that the mere ordinary earthly flame, born so mysteriously, is but the last and lowest link in a wondrous chain, which includes all fire, aërial and celestial, all light, all heat, and hence all life; a chain which descends . . . from the dwelling-place of Him who is ‘a consuming fire’ [Deut. 4:24].  And this aspect of Agni will explain why the different divinities are identified with him . . .” — p. 296 (Transactions of the Victoria Institute, v. 13)
In India, God is called . . . Eashoor, Esur, Iswur . . .
p/q: The Book of God — The Apocalypse of Adam-Oannes [by E. V. H. Kenealy], 1867: “In the Hindustanee, God is called Eashoor, Esur, Iswur; in the Shanscreet, Eswara . . .” — p. 114
Is’Vara, in Sanskrit the Lord, from Isa, but this is primarily the name of Siva
see: Monier Williams, Sanskrit-English Dictionary, 1872: “Īśa . . . a master, a lord . . . N. of Śiva . . .”  “Īśvara . . . master, lord . . . the supreme, especially Śiva . . .” — p. 144
Agni (ignis), Vayu, and Sûrya — Fire, Air, and the Sun, three occult degrees of fire
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “AGNI. (Nom. Agnis=Ignis) . . . appears in three phases — in heaven as the sun, in mid-air as lightning, on earth as ordinary fire.  Agni is one of the chief deities of the Vedas . . . [and] one of the three great deities — Agni, Vāyu (or Indra), and Sūrya — who respectively preside over earth, air, and sky, and are all equal in dignity.” — p. 6
In the Hebrew אזא (aza), means to illuminate . . .
p/q: The Book of God — The Apocalypse of Adam-Oannes [by E. V. H. Kenealy], 1867: “In the Hebrew אזא aza, means to illuminate.  אשא asha, is Fire.” — p. 114
“to kindle a fire” is synonymous to evoking one of the three great fire-powers
see: Original Sanskrit Texts, tr. J. Muir, 1868-73: “Agni is in some passages represented as having a triple existence, by which may be intended his threefold manifestations, as the sun in heaven, as lightning in the atmosphere, and as ordinary fire in the earth . . .”  “ ‘. . . men kindle Agni, the bearer of oblations . . .’ ” — 5:206, 207 fn.
In Sanskrit Osch or Asch is fire or heat . . .
p/q: The Book of God — The Apocalypse of Adam-Oannes [by E. V. H. Kenealy], 1867: “In the Shanscreet, Osch, or Asch, is Fire, or Heat; and the Egyptian word Osiris, has been by Schelling thought to be compounded of the two primitives איש aish אסר asr, or a Fire-Enchanter.” — p. 114
Aesar in the old Etruscan meant a God . . .
p/q: The Book of God — The Apocalypse of Adam-Oannes [by E. V. H. Kenealy], 1867: “Aesar, in the old Etruscan, meant a God.  The Aeswar or Iswara of the Hindus is analogous.  In the Bhagavad-Geeta we read; Aeswar resides in every mortal being, and puts in movement, by his supernatural powers, all things which mount on the wheel of time.  As Fire was supposed to be the first Principle, it was also supposed . . . to be the destroyer, whence arose the idea of the Creator and Destroyer being identified.” — pp. 114-15
“The primitive fire was supposed to have an insatiable appetite . . .”
p/q: The Book of God — The Apocalypse of Adam-Oannes [by E. V. H. Kenealy], 1867: “The primitive Fire was supposed to have an insatiable appetite for devouring.  Maximus of Tyre relates that the ancient Persians threw into the fire combustible matters, crying, Devour, O Lord!  In the Irish language easam, or asam, signifies to make, or create.” — p. 115
Aesar was the name of an ancient Irish god . . .”
p/q: The Book of God — The Apocalypse of Adam-Oannes [by E. V. H. Kenealy], 1867: “Aesar was the name also of one of the ancient Irish gods; the literal meaning of the word is ‘to kindle a fire.’ ” — p. 114
The four elements formed from divine substances . . .
see: A. E. Waite, The Mysteries of Magic, 1886: “The material elements, analogous to the divine elements, are popularly classified as four . . . The magical elements are in alchemy salt, mercury, sulphur, and azoth . . . in symbolism, the man, eagle, lion, and bull; in old physics . . . air, water, earth, and fire.” — pp. 118-19 (“Writings of Éliphas Lévi”)
St. Matthew.       Angel-Man . . . (Jesus-Christ . . .)
see: Alexander H. Grant, The Church Seasons, 1881: “ ‘The general application of the Four Creatures to the Four Evanagelists . . . propounded by St. Jerome, in his commentary on Ezekiel . . . to St. Matthew was given the Angelic, or Human semblance . . . because in his Gospel the Human Nature of the Saviour is more insisted on than the Divine.’ ” — p. 290
St. Mark.      The Lion       Fire
St. Luke.      The Bull        Earth
St. John.      The Eagle     Air
see: Alexander H. Grant, The Church Seasons, 1881: “ ‘In Greek art the four emblems are united in one mysterious cherub-like form called a Tetramorph . . . with the four heads of a Man, a Lion, an Ox, and an Eagle joined onto one body.’ ” — p. 291
see: A. E. Waite, The Mysteries of Magic, 1886: “The symbolic tetrad [Tetramorph] . . . corresponded to the four elements.  The chalice held by the man, or aquarius, corresponded to water; air was represented by the circle, or nimbus, which surrounds the head of the celestial eagle; fire . . . symbolized in the lion; earth is represented by . . . the sacred bull . . .” — pp. 119-20 (“Writings of Éliphas Lévi”)

— 115 —

the Quintessence . . . Lucis Æterna
see: Jacob Behmen, Works, 1781: “It is the visible World; an Image and Quintessence . . . a Manifestation of the inward spiritual World, come out of the eternal Light [Lucis Æternae] . . .” — 4:104 (“Of Heaven and Hell”)
ΦΛΟΞ . . . Flamma . . . Lucis
see: Christian C. J. Bunsen, Egypt’s Place in Universal History, 1860: “ ‘Æon and Protogonos again begat mortal children: they were called Phôs, Pyr, and Phlox [ΦΛΟΞ] (light, fire, and flame).’ ” — 4:188 (“Philo’s Cosmogonies”)
Flamma-Virgo . . . Lucis Æterna
see: C. W. King, The Gnostics and Their Remains, 1887: “ ‘. . . Rabbi . . . we have heard thee saying that there is . . . another baptism of the Spirit of Holy Light, and moreover an unction of the Spirit . . . Jesus said unto them, Do ye seek after these mysteries?  No mystery is more excellent than they; which shall bring your souls unto the Light of Lights . . .’ ” — pp. 200-1 (Pistis-Sophia, § 378)
      “ ‘. . . they bring the soul before the Virgin of Light . . .’ ”  “ ‘. . . the Receivers of Light baptize the same and give unto it the spiritual unction.’ ” — pp. 353-4 (Pistis-Sophia, §§ 282, 292)
Virgo, Lucis Æterna Mater
see: Augustino de Roskovány, Beata Virgo Maria, 1873: “Virgo sancta, lucis aeternae mater [Holy Virgin, mother of eternal light]!” — 1:14 (“Monumenta Mariana,” § 28)
this shell . . . sought to form its first inhabitants, the pre-human monsters
see: Stanza II: “This relates to . . . chaos on Earth . . . in which monsters, half-human, half-animal, were generated. . . . [They] were the production of physical nature alone . . . and the first attempt to create man . . .”  “Thus physical nature . . . can produce the first two and the lower animal kingdoms, but when it comes to the turn of man, spiritual, independent and intelligent powers are required for his creation . . .” — SD 2:52-3, 56
Berosus obtained his information . . . from Ea . . . deity of Wisdom.
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The Chaldean historian Bêrôssos . . . obtained his knowledge from a document said to have been written by the deity Ea or Wisdom . . .” — pp. 242-3
the woman Omoroka, who is . . . the Greek Thalassa . . . the Sea
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “ ‘The person who . . . presided over them was a woman named Omoroka, which in the Chaldean language is Thalatth (read Thavatth), which in Greek is interpreted Thalassa (the sea) . . .’ ” — p. 369
which esoterically and even exoterically is the Moon
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “ ‘. . . but according to the most true interpretation it is equivalent to the Moon . . . All this was an allegorical description of nature. . . . {Euseb. Chron. i. 4.}.’ ” — pp. 369, 370 fn.
(Vide Hibbert Lectures, p. 370 et seq. . . .)
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “. . . the cosmological theories of the Babylonians thus given by Bêrôssos . . . In one of them, the composite creatures who filled the watery chaos . . . were represented as being destroyed by Bel when he cut Thavatth asunder, forming the heavens . . . and the earth . . . In the second version, the monsters of chaos perished through the creation of light . . .” — p. 370 (Hibbert Lectures)
(Vide . . . also in Part II., “Adam-Adami.”)
see: “Adam-Adami”: “The Kabalists teach . . . the transformation of four consecutive Adams . . . the first being the ‘perfect, Holy Adam’; . . . ‘a shadow that disappeared’ . . . the second is called the protoplastic androgyne Adam . . . the third Adam is the man made of ‘dust’ . . . and the fourth, is the supposed forefather of our own race — the Fallen Adam . . . ‘He has the animal power of reproduction and continuance of species,’ and this is the human Root-Race.” — SD 2:457
Brahmâ, who is said . . . to create everything through Yoga power
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā then, being desirous of creating the four orders of beings . . . collected his mind into itself {‘Collecting his mind into itself’ . . . is the performance of the Yoga}.” — 1:79-80 & fn. (i.5)
Brahmâ, Vishnu and Siva are the most powerful energies of God
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the lord of all, himself becoming Brahmā, engaged in the creation of the universe.  Vishṇu, with the quality of goodness, and of immeasurable power, preserves created things through successive ages, until the close of the period termed a Kalpa; when the same mighty deity . . . assumes the awful form of Rudra [Śiva], and swallows up the universe. . . . Thus the one only god . . . takes the designation of Brahmā, Vishṇu, and Śiva, accordingly as he creates, preserves, or destroys.” — 1:41 (i.2)

— Footnotes

With the Chaldees, the Egyptians, from whom Moses adopted Chroub . . .
see: Charles Bradlaugh, Genesis: Its Authorship and Authenticity, 1882: “ ‘According to Rosenmüller, Moses had taken the figure of the Chroub from the ancient Egyptian sanctuaries . . .’ ”  “ ‘The term cherub,’ says Calmet, ‘in Hebrew, is sometimes taken for a calf, or an ox. . . . The word cherub in Syriac and in Chaldee, signifies to till or plough, which is the work of oxen.’ ” — pp. 127-8
the Angels . . . were symbolized . . . by the Lion (Mikael); the Bull (Uriel); the Dragon (Raphael)
p/q: La Bible, tr. Samuel Cahen, 1845: “Quant aux génies des ophites, le premier avait la forme et la figure d’un lion, et était appelé Michel; le second la forme d’un taureau, et s’appelait Uriel; le troisième la forme d’un dragon, et s’appelait Raphael [As for the spirits of the Ophites, the first had the form and the face of a lion and was called Michael; the second had the form of a bull and was called Uriel; the third had the form of a dragon and was called Raphael] . . .” — 1:17 fn.
the Eagle (Gabriel); the Bear (Thot-Sabaoth); the Dog (Erataoth) . . .
p/q: La Bible, tr. Samuel Cahen, 1845: “. . . le quatrième [avait] la figure d’un aigle et s’appelait Gabriel; le cinquième la forme d’un ours et se nommait Thauthabaot; le sixième . . . avait la figure d’un chien, et se nommait Erataoth; enfin le septième, la figure d’un âne, et se nommait Onoel ou Thartharaoth (Origène, liv. 6) [the fourth had the face of an eagle and was called Gabriel; the fifth the form of a bear and was named Thauthabaoth; the sixth . . . had the face of a dog and was named Erataoth; and finally the seventh, the face of a donkey, and he was named Onoel or Thartharaoth (Origen, Bk. 6)].” — 1:17 fn.

— 116 —

Dhyâna . . . is again synonymous with Yoga in the Tibetan text
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “. . . ‘he who is strong in the Yoga (meditation) is able to introduce his soul by means of the Yoga into the true nature of existence.’ ” — p. 40
      “. . . if man has once succeeded . . . to meditate with unmoved mind . . . in the four degrees of meditation, Dhyāna . . . he finally arrives at entire imperturbability . . .” — p. 54
abstract meditation through which the Dhyani-Buddhas create their celestial sons . . .
p/q: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “The Dhyāni Buddhas have the faculty of creating from themselves by virtue of Dhyāna, or abstract meditation, an equally celestial son, a Dhyāni Bōdhisattva . . .” — p. 52
All the creatures in the world would have each a superior above.
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘All that which is on the earth, is also found above (in perfect prototype) . . .’  This is also the view of R. Yitz’haq Luria.  ‘All the creatures in the world have each a superior above.’ ” — pp. 109-10
“This superior whose inner pleasure it is to emanate into them . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘This superior, whose inner pleasure it is to emanate into them, cannot impart efflux until they have adored.’ {Sepher M’bo Sha-arim}” — p. 110 & fn.
microscopic research shows no permanence of any particular mode of reproducing life
see: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “Microscopic research brings to light fresh facts confounding our fixed ideas as to the permanence of particular modes of reproducing life . . .” — p. 90
“it shows that the same organism may run through various metamorphoses . . .”
p/q: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “. . . showing that the same organism may run through various metamorphoses in the course of its life-cycle, during some of which it may be sexual and in others asexual, i.e., it may reproduce itself alternately by the co-operation of two beings of opposite sex, and by fissure or budding from one being only which is of no sex.” — p. 90

— 117 —

just as Occultism regards the “fiery lives”
see: Stanza VII: “The physical body of man . . . its destruction and preservation are due to the alternate function of the fiery lives as ‘destroyers’ and ‘builders.’  They are ‘builders’ by sacrificing themselves in the form of vitality to restrain the destructive influence of the microbes . . . They are ‘destroyers’ also when that restraint is removed and the microbes . . . are left to run riot as destructive agents.” — SD 1:262-3 fn.
Shakespeare . . . who divided the ages of man into a series of seven
see: William Shakespeare, As You Like It:
              “All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits, and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages.” — Act II, sc. vii, 139-43

— 118 —

“If thou wilt know the invisible, open thine eye wide on the visible”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The Talmudic maxim is: ‘If thou wilt know the invisible have an open eye for the visible.’ ” — p. 109
“It has been known that in the vertebrate kingdom one sex bears rudiments . . .”
p/q: Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, 1876: “It has long been known that in the vertebrate kingdom one sex bears rudiments of various accessory parts, appertaining to the reproductive system, which properly belong to the opposite sex . . . Hence some remote progenitor of the whole vertebrate kingdom appears to have been hermaphrodite or androgynous.” — p. 161
“But here we encounter a singular difficulty. . . .”
p/q: Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, 1876: “But here we encounter a singular difficulty.  In the mammalian class the males possess rudiments of a uterus with the adjacent passage, in their vesiculæ prostaticæ; they bear also rudiments of mammæ, and some male Marsupials have traces of a marsupial sack.  Other analogous facts could be added.  Are we, then, to suppose that some extremely ancient mammal continued androgynous, after it had acquired the chief distinctions of its class, and therefore after it had diverged from the lower classes of the vertebrate kingdom?  This seems very improbable, for we have to look to fishes, the lowest of all the classes, to find any still existent androgynous forms.” — p. 161

— 119 —

“The fact that various accessory organs proper to each sex . . .”
p/q: Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, 1876: “That various accessory parts, proper to each sex, are found in a rudimentary condition in the opposite sex, may be explained by such organs having been gradually acquired by the one sex, and then transmitted in a more or less imperfect state to the other.” — pp. 161-2
the case of “spurs, plumes, and brilliant colours . . .”
p/q: Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, 1876: “. . . we shall meet with innumerable instances of this form of transmission, — as in the case of the spurs, plumes, and brilliant colours, acquired for battle or ornament by male birds, and inherited by the females in an imperfect or rudimentary condition.” — p. 162
Naudin, who gave the name of Blastema to . . . protoplasm, put forward a theory
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “M. Naudin admits the existence of a protoplasma or primordial blastema . . . endowed with the power of producing by buds and with a great activity meso-organisms, similar to the first, though already more complicated.” — p. 122
He made Adam . . . spring suddenly from the clay . . . the Blastema of Science.
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “This is Adam, who sprang from a primordial blastema called clay in the Bible.  At this epoch, he was . . . neither male nor female; the two sexes were not yet differentiated.” — p.124
“It is from this larval form of mankind that the evolutive force . . .”
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “ ‘It is from this larval form of mankind, that the evolutive force effected the completion of the species.  For the accomplishment of this great phenomenon, Adam had to pass through a phase of immobility and unconsciousness, very analogous to the nymphal state of animals undergoing metamorphosis.’ ” — p. 124
mankind, “which remained concealed within a temporary organism . . .”
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “In its first phase, mankind was concealed within a temporary organism, already distinct from all others, and incapable of contracting an alliance with any of them.” — p. 124
the differentiation of sexes accomplished by “a process of germination . . .”
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “. . . the work of differentiation was accomplished . . . by a process of germination, similar to that of medusæ and ascidians.” — p. 124
Mankind, thus constituted . . . “would retain a sufficient evolutive force . . .”
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “Mankind, thus constituted physiologically, would retain a sufficient evolutive force for the rapid production of the various great human races.” — p. 124
he says . . . Naudin’s ideas “do not form a scientific theory”
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “. . . I will confine myself to a single observation upon all these ideas [of Naudin]; properly speaking, they do not form a scientific theory.” — p. 124

— 119-20 —

inasmuch as primordial Blastema is connected . . . with the First Cause . . .
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “If the first cause, with which M. Naudin immediately connects his primoridal blastema, has made potentially in this blastema all past, present and future beings, as well as the power of producing them at the proper time, with all their distinctive characters, It has, in reality, created all these beings en masse.” — pp. 124-5

— 120 —

Naudin does not even consider the secondary Causes . . .
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “We do not see what kind of action is reserved for second causes . . . Naudin has not even mentioned their part in this evolution of the organic world.” — p. 125
Science . . . has thus “nothing to say to the theory of Naudin”
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “That science which is only occupied with second causes has, therefore, nothing to say to the theory of M. Naudin.  It can neither praise nor criticise it.”— p. 125
Naudin declares that evolution has progressed by sudden leaps . . .
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “M. Naudin . . . rejects no less strongly the idea of gradual transmutations, which require millions of years . . . He insists, on the contrary, upon the suddenness with which most of the variations observed in plants have been produced . . . Darwin, in the last edition of his work recognises the reality of these sudden leaps . . .” — p. 122
his “ancient and general process of creation” from proto-organisms
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “He recognises true proto-organisms in the pro-embryo of mosses, in the larvæ of insects, and of many other inferior animals.  He lays particular stress upon the phenomena of alternate generation . . . as representing in part ‘the ancient and general process of creation.’ ” — pp. 123-4
“All that which is in the lower (our) world . . . is found in the upper. . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘All that which is contained in the Lower World is also found in the Upper (in prototype).  The Lower and Upper reciprocally act upon each other.’ ” — p. 109
Vide infra, Part II., “Esoteric Tenets . . .”
see: “Esoteric Tenets Corroborated in Every Scripture,” SD 2:449-641.
The Homunculi of Paracelsus . . .
see: Franz Hartmann, The Life of Paracelsus, 1887: “ ‘Human beings may come into existence without natural parents. . . . The generatio homunculi has until now been kept very secret . . . But I know that such things may be accomplished . . . If the sperma . . . [is] properly ‘magnetized,’ it may begin to live and to move.  After such a time it bears the form and resemblance of a human being, but it will be transparent and without a corpus.’ ” — p. 174 (Paracelsus, “Homunculi”)
the “Self-born” progenitors of our doctrine are identical with the Pitris
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā then . . . thinking of himself as the father of the world, the progenitors (the Pitṛis) were born from his side.” — 1:80-1 (i.5)

— 121 —

these Pitris . . . issued from Brahmâ’s “body of twilight”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “chapter v. . . . Origin of different orders of beings from Brahmā’s body under different conditions . . .”  “. . . the progenitors (the Pitṛis) were born from his side.  The body, when he abandoned it, became the Sandhyā (or evening twilight) . . .” — 1:68, 80-1 (i.5)

— 121-2 —

Leda . . . gave birth . . . to “two sons of valiant heart” — Castor and Pollux.
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “. . . Lèda, l’épouse de Tyndare, qui, de Tyndare, mit au jour deux fils au cœur vaillant: Castor . . . Pollux {Odyss., XI} [Leda, the wife of Tyndarus, who by Tyndarus gave birth to two sons of valiant heart: Castor . . . Pollux] . . .” — p. 651 & fn.

— 122 —

Jupiter endows them with . . . privilege.  They are semi-immortal . . .
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Mais ils sont en possession d’un singulier privilège, qu’ils tiennent de la faveur de Jupiter. . . . ils jouissent d’une demi-immortalité: ils vivent et ils meurent tour à tour, de deux jours l’un (έτερήμεροι) [But they are in possession of a singular privilege, which they have through the favor of Jupiter. . . . they enjoy semi-immortality; they live and die in turn, every other day].” — p. 651
their two wives . . . the daughters of Apollo . . .
see: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Leucippos . . . avait deux filles . . . qui furent enlevées par Castor et Pollux, dont elles devinrent les épouses . . . elles s’appellent Phœbè et Hilaeira {Hyg., Fab., 80.  Ovid., Fast., 700}.  Or, d’après l’auteur des Chants cypriaques, Phœbè et Hilaeira étaient les filles d’Apollon {Pausan., III, 16, 1} [Leucippus . . . had two daughters . . . who were carried away by Castor and Pollux, whose wives they became . . . they are called Phœbe and Hilaeira {Hyginus, Fabularum, 80.  Ovid, Fasti, 700}.  But, according to the author of Chants cypriaques, Phœbe and Hilaeira were the daughters of Apollo {Pausanius, III, 16, 1}].” — p. 653 & fns.
personifying the Dawn and the Twilight
see: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Les filles d’Apollon-Leucippos sont donc une création mythologique analogue à celle de Phaéthousa et Lampétié, les filles du Soleil.  L’une d’elles serait ainsi un nom de l’Aurore [The daughters of Apollo-Leucippus are thus a mythological creation that is analogous to that of Phaethousa and Lampetia, the daughters of the Sun.  One of them would thus be a name for the Dawn (or Twilight)] . . .” — p. 653
 Zeus is shown as the father of the two heroes — born from the egg to which Leda gives birth
see: J. Lemprière, Bibliotheca Classica, 1833: “Castor and Pollux, were twin brothers, sons of Jupiter [Zeus], by Leda . . . [Jupiter] changed himself into a beautiful swan . . . . Some suppose that Leda brought forth only one egg, from which Castor and Pollux sprung.” — 1:332
Leda is the mythical bird . . . in the traditions of various peoples . . .
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Lèda est donc l’oiseau mythique qui, dans les traditions des différents peuples de race aryenne, sous différents noms (oie, canard, poule), pond des œufs d’or [So Leda is the mythical bird who, in the traditions of different peoples of the Aryan race, under different names (goose, duck, chicken), lays golden eggs].” — p. 652
the beauteous daughter of the Ether, “the Water Mother,” creates the world . . .
p/q: The Kalevala, tr. John Martin Crawford, 1888:
“In primeval times, a maiden,
  Beauteous Daughter of the Ether,
  Passed for ages her existence
  In the great expanse of heaven . . .
  She descended to the ocean . . .
  Thus she swam as water-mother . . .” — 1:5-6
with a “Duck” . . . who lays six golden eggs, and the seventh, “an egg of iron”
p/q: The Kalevala, tr. John Martin Crawford, 1888:
“. . . a beauteous Duck descending,
  Hastens toward the water-mother . . .
  Six, the golden eggs she lays there,
  Then a seventh, an egg of iron . . .” — 1:7-8
Castor and Pollux . . . the Dioscuri (of Apollodorus III. 10, 7)
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “. . . suivant une autre version, elle enfante deux œufs: de l’un sort Hélène, de l’autre les brillants Dioscures, Castor et Pollux {Apollod., III, 10, 7} [according to another version, she (Leda) brings forth two eggs: Helena comes out of one, out of the other come the magnificent Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux].” — p. 652
Pindar shows Leda uniting herself . . . to her husband and also to the father of the gods
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Chez Pindare, Lèda s’est unie dans la même nuit à son époux et au maître du ciel.  Castor est le fils de Tyndare; Pollux est le fils de Jupiter {Nem., X, 80 et suiv.  Theocr., XXIV, 131} [In Pindar Leda is united, in the same night, with her husband and with the master of the heavens.  Castor is the son of Tyndarus; Pollux is the son of Jupiter (Zeus) {Nemeonikai, x.80 et seq.; Theocritus, xxiv.131}].” — p. 652 & fn.
Thus Castor is the son of the Mortal, Pollux the progeny of the Immortal.
see: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Ce dernier seul est donc immortel, tandis que le premier est sujet à la vieillesse et à la mort. . . . Pollux, le frère immortel . . . Castor, son frère mortel [So only the latter is immortal, while the former is subject to old age and death. . . . Pollux, the immortal brother . . . Castor, his mortal brother] . . .” — p. 652
In the allegory . . . the Apherides
see: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “. . . Leucippos a pour frère Aphareus, qui est le père de Lynceus et d’Idas [les Apharides] . . . une paire fraternelle, qui a peut-être la même origine que celle de Castor et Pollux [Leucippus has a brother Aphareus, who is the father of Lynceus and Idas (the Apharētides) . . . a brotherly pair who have perhaps the same origin as that of Castor and Pollux].” — p. 653
Pollux kills Lynceus — “of all mortals he whose sight is the most penetrating”
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Les Dioscures . . . dirigent une expédition . . . voulant châtier les Apharides, ils leur tendent une embuscade {Apollod., III, 11, 1}. . . . Lynceus, ‘celui de tous les mortels dont le regard est le plus pénétrant’, les aperçoit; il prend la fuite avec son frère [The Dioscuri . . . organize an expedition . . . wanting to chastize the Apharētides, they ambush them. . . . Lynceus, ‘the one among all mortals whose sight is the most penetrating,’ sees them; he flees with his brother].” — p. 654 & fn.
but Castor is wounded by Idas, “he who sees and knows”
see: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Lynceus . . . dont la vue perçante était devenue proverbiale chez les Grecs, Idas (celui qui voit ou qui connait), composent une paire fraternelle [Lynceus . . . whose penetrating sight had become proverbial among the Greeks, and Idas (he who sees or who knows) form a brotherly pair]. . .”— p. 653
      “Pollux les poursuit, tue Lynceus; mais Castor est blessé par la lance d’Idas [Pollux pursues them, and kills Lynceus; but Castor is wounded by Idas’ lance].” — p. 654
Zeus . . . hurling his thunderbolt and killing the last two combatants
see: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “La lutte va continuer, quand Jupiter fait retentir son tonnerre et lance sa foudre qui consume les deux combattants [The fight is about to continue when Jupiter makes his thunder resound and launches his thunderbolt which consumes the two combatants].” — p. 654

— Footnotes

Castor’s tomb was shown in Sparta . . . he was called . . . μιξαρχαγέτας
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Castor était considéré comme un mortel.  On montrait son tombeau à Sparte (Pausan., III, 13, 1) et à Argos, où il portait le nom de μιξαρχαγέτας, c’est-à-dire demi-héros (Plut., Quæst. Gr., 23) [Castor was considered a mortal.  His tomb was said to be in Sparta (Pausanias, III, 13, 1) and in Argos, where he has the name μιξαρχαγέτας, that is demi-hero (Plutarch, Quæstiones Græcæ, 23)].” — p. 654 fn.

— 122-3 —

Pollux finds his brother dying. . . . he calls upon Zeus to slay him also.
see: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Pollux arrive auprès de son frère qu’il trouve rendant le dernier soupir.  Dans sa douleur . . . il supplie Jupiter de lui donner la mort, à lui aussi [Pollux approaches his brother whom he finds breathing his last breath.  In his grief . . . he begs Jupiter that he may also die].” — p. 654

— 123 —

“Thou canst not die altogether” . . .
see: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Le mâitre des dieux lui répond qu’il ne peut mourir entièrement, car il est de race divine . . . mais il lui offre le choix . . . Ou bien . . . il vivra éternellement dans l’Olympe . . . ou, s’il veut partager en tout l’existence de son frère, la moitié de son existence se passera sous la terre, l’autre moitié ‘dans les demeures dorées du ciel’ [The chief of the gods replies that he cannot fully die, because he is of a divine race . . . but he offers him the choice . . . either he will . . . live eternally on Olympus . . . or he may partake of the entire existence of his brother, half his existence will take place underground, the other half in the golden abode of the heavens].” — p. 654
This semi-immortality, which is also to be shared by Castor, is accepted
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Cette demi-immortalité, qui sera aussi celle de Castor, est acceptée par Pollux {Pindare, Nem., X, 60 sqq., Dissen.}; et c’est ainsi que les deux frères vivent de deux jours l’un, ou, suivant une interprétation déjà donnée par les anciens {Schol. Eurip. Orest., 463, Dindorf}, l’un le jour, l’autre la nuit [This semi-immortality, which will be shared by Castor, is accepted by Pollux; and thus the two brothers live every other day, or, according to one interpretation already given by the ancients {Scholia in Euripides, Orestes, 463, Dindorf}, one during the day, the other during the night].” — p. 654 & fns.
The widely spread . . . interpretation of it . . . as symbolical of brotherly devotion . . .
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Ce dévouement fraternel de Pollux, qui était célèbre dans l’antiquité {Plut., Moral., p. 484 f.}, est évidemment une image empruntée au spectacle de la nature [This brotherly devotion of Pollux, which was celebrated in antiquity, is evidently an image borrowed from the spectacle of nature].” — pp. 654-5

— Footnotes [123-124]

“Castor and Pollux,” he says, “are nothing but the Sun and the Moon . . .”
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Si Pollux et Castor ne sont autre chose que le Soleil et la Lune, conçus comme deux frères jumeaux, on s’explique comment ils meurent et ils vivent tour à tour [If Pollux and Castor are nothing but the Sun and the Moon, conceived as twins, one can explain how they in turn die and live].” — p. 655
“The Sun, the immortal and powerful being that disappears every evening . . .”
p/q: P. Decharme, Mythologie de la Grèce Antique, 1886: “Le Soleil, l’être puissant et immortel, qui chaque soir disparaît à l’horizon et descend sous la terre, comme s’il voulait faire place à l’astre fraternel qui arrive à la vie avec la nuit, c’est Pollux qui se sacrifie pour Castor; Castor inférieur à son frère, à qui il doit sa part d’immortalité, car la lune, disait Théophraste, n’est qu’un autre soleil tres faible [The Sun, the powerful and immortal being that disappears at the horizon every night and descends under the earth, as if he wanted to make room for the fraternal orb which comes to life at night, is Pollux who sacrifices himself for Castor; Castor who is inferior to his brother, to whom he owes his share of immortality, because the moon, said Theophrastus, is only another, but weaker sun].” — p. 655

— 124 —

Divine wisdom . . . the tree of the knowledge . . .
see: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883: “. . . [I] arrived at the garden of righteousness. . . . The tree of knowledge also was there, of which if any one eats, he becomes endowed with great wisdom. . . . Then holy Raphael, an angel who was with me . . . said, This is the tree of knowledge, of which thy ancient father and thy aged mother ate, who were before thee . . .” — pp. 36-7 (xxxi.2-3, 5)

— Footnotes [124-5]

“It takes Earth and Water [to] create a human soul”
see: Henry Cornelius Agrippa, Three Books of Occult Philosophy, 1898: “For Moses writes, that only Earth and Water bring forth a living soul.” — 1:45
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.  And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.” — p. 3 (Genesis, 2:6-7)
Mars is the Hindu Mangala . . . Kartikeya, the “War-God,” born of Gharma-ja . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “MANGALA.  The planet Mars, identified with Kārtikeya, the god of war.  He was the son of Śiva and the Earth . . . He is also called Śiva-gharma-ja, ‘born of the sweat of Śiva’ . . . [and] Lohita, ‘the red’ . . .” — p. 198

— 124-5 —

In the Book of Enoch we have Adam . . .
see: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883: “In that day shall be distributed for food two monsters; a female monster, whose name is Leviathan . . . And a male monster, whose name is Behemoth . . . he received it from my ancestor, who was man, from Adam the first of men . . . those monsters . . . became separated on the same day . . .” — p. 67 (lviii.7-10)
see: Thrice-Greatest Hermes, tr. G. R. S. Mead, 1906: “. . . in the Book of Enoch, the apocalyptic writer associates these two monsters . . .”  “. . . notice that Leviathan and Behemoth were believed to have once formed one monster, which was subsequently divided into male and female . . . just as the animals were first of all male-female, and subsequently were separated.” — 1:424, 426 (Prolegomena)
see: Gerald Massey, Ancient Egypt, 1907: “. . . the primal pair of beings were not constellated as the human parents of the human race, but as male and female . . . Behemoth and Leviathan . . . the primal pair are represented in the book of Genesis by Adam and Eve . . .” — 2:588

— 125 —

becoming Jah-Heva . . . the double-sexed Jehovah
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “The Deity name, J’hovah, is a compound of . . . Jah, and hovah . . . The word Jehovah, or Jah-Eve, has the primary significance of hermaphrodite existence or being, as male-female . . .” — p. 8
Cain and Abel (male and female)
see: Laurence Oliphant, Scientific Religion, 1888: “As the processes of nature are gradual . . . the clothing with skins . . . was extended over a protracted period . . . during which time a constant separation was being effected between the masculine and feminine principles, until it reached the point signified in the fourth chapter of Genesis, by the birth of Cain and Abel.  Cain, as his Hebrew name implies, signifying the male principle . . . and Abel, as his name implies, signifying the breath (pneuma) or female principle.” — p. 257
“Male and female created he them . . . and called their name Adam”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “This is the book of the generations of Adam.  In the day that God created man, in the likeness of God made he him; male and female created he them . . . and called their name Adam . . .” — p. 6 (Genesis, 5:1-2)
“And Adam begat a son in his own likeness . . .”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And Adam . . . begat a son in his own likeness, after his image; and called his name Seth . . . after he had begotten Seth . . . he begat sons and daughters.” — p. 6 (Genesis, 5:3-4)
“The two words of which Jehovah is composed make up the original idea of male-female . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “. . . the two words of which Jehovah is composed, make up the original idea of male-female, as the birth originator (for the י was the membrum virile, and Hovah was Eve).” — p. 159
Eve, the mother of all living, or the procreatrix, Earth and Nature
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “ ‘Muth . . . was the Egyptian cognomen of Venus (Eve, mother of all living) . . . Plutarch (Is. 374) hands it down that “Isis was sometimes called Muth, which word means mother. . . . Perhaps Muth is to be derived from Man-tho, mater terra (Eve-Adam) . . .”  Isis, he says, is that part of nature which, as feminine, contains in herself, as (nutrix) nurse, all things to be born.’ ” — p. 294
“It is seen that the perfect one . . . as originator of measures . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “So, it is seen that the perfect one, as originator of measures, takes also the form of birth origin, as hermaphrodite one; hence, the phallic form and use.” — p. 159
the first and original meaning of Enos, the son of Seth . . .
see: Laurence Oliphant, Scientific Religion, 1888: “The physiological change culminated at the race of Seth . . . The birth of Seth marks a new departure for the race . . . we are told that Adam ‘begat a son in his own likeness,’ in contradistinction to the immediately preceding verse, where it is said, ‘In the day that God created man, in the likeness of God made He him; male and female created He them . . . and called their name Adam.’ . . . the great change which had taken place . . . resulted in a man being no longer born in the divine likeness as two-in-one . . . Hence the son of Seth was called ‘Enos,’ a word signifying ‘a man of sorrow.’ ” — pp. 259-60

— Footnotes

Abel is Chebel, meaning “Pains of Birth,” conception.
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “ה . . . Hē . . . womb (Kabbala) . . .”  “ח . . . Chēth . . . Affinity with ה, as the womb.” — p. 10
      “. . . ה, or the womb value . . . the primal emptiness out of which reality sprung.” — p. 158
      “Abel is הבל, Hebel . . . The meaning of the word Hebel is emptiness, nothingness.”  “. . . חבל, chebel, signifies, to conceive, also pains of birth.” — pp. 282-3, 284
See “Isis Unveiled” . . . where Jehovah is shown to be Adam and Eve blended . . .
see: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “. . . the word Jehovah . . . This is so well known to the kabalists, that in their careful etymology of the יהוה they show it beyond doubt to be . . . composed of the two-fold name of the first androgyne — Adam and Eve, Jod (or Yodh), Vau and He-Va — the female serpent as a symbol of Divine Intelligence proceeding from the One-Generative or Creative Spirit.” — 2:398
See “Isis Unveiled” . . . “The union of the two create a third Race . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “One thing, at least, has been shown in the Hebrew text, viz.: that there was one race of purely physical creatures, another purely spiritual. . . . the union of these two races produced a third — the Adamite race.  Sharing the natures of both its parents, it is equally adapted to an existence in the material and spiritual worlds.” — 1:305

— 126 —

Enos is referred to as the “Son of man.” (Vida infra.)
see: “Enoïchion-Henoch”: “. . . notice the character of the mysterious and Cosmopolitan Enoch, variously called Enos, Hanoch . . . The number Seven being attached to, and connected with, each of those primitive Initiators {Khanoch, or Hanoch, or Enoch means the ‘Initiator’ and ‘teacher,’ as well as the ‘Son of Man,’ Enos (vide Genesis iv., 26), esoterically} . . .” — SD 2:529 & fn.
Yah and Jah, the letters i or j or y being interchangeable, or Jah-Hovah, i.e. male and female . . .
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “The Deity name, J’hovah, is a compound of two words . . . Jah, and hovah, or הוה . . . The word Jehovah, or Jah-Eve, has the primary significance of hermaphrodite existence or being, as male-female . . . the י, or i, or j, or y, stands for Jah, or male . . .” — p. 8
Brahmâ . . . divides his body into male and female
see: Ordinances of Manu, tr. Burnell, ed. Hopkins, 1884: “Having divided his own body into two, he became a male by half, by half a female . . .” — p. 6 (i.6)
the “creation” of the world is generally considered . . . to be Lilâ . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The creation of the world is very commonly considered to be the Līlā . . . sport or amusement, of the supreme being.” — 1:20 fn.
“Vishnu being thus discrete and indiscrete substance . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Vishṇu, being thus discrete and indiscrete substance, spirit, and time, sports like a playful boy, as you shall learn by listening to his frolics.” — 1:19-20 (i.2)
“The Kabalists say that the entering into existence . . . happens through delight . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “A curious idea of the Qabbalists is, that as to emanation stated in the book, Nobeleth ’Hokhmah: ‘The Qabbalists say, that the entering into existence of the worlds, happened through delight, in that Ain Soph, rejoiced in Itself, and flashed and beamed from Itself to Itself; and from these intelligent movements . . . which are called delight, Its sources have spread themselves toward the outside, as seeds for the world . . .’ ” — p. 110

— Footnotes

Jod in the Kabala has for symbol the hand, the forefinger . . .
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “ י y, i, or j.  Yōdh.  Hand, bent forefinger, membrum virile . . . The perfect number, or one (Kabbala).” — p. 10

— 127 —

Jah-hovah is the generic name of that group . . . of creative planetary angels
see: Morals and Dogma of Freemasonry, comp. Albert Pike, 1871: “In the Hebrew writings, the term ‘Heavenly Hosts’ includes not only the counsellors and emissaries of Jehovah, but also the celestial luminaries; and the stars, imagined in the East to be animated intelligences . . . are identified with the more distinctly impersonated messengers or angels . . . whose predominance in Heaven is in mysterious correspondence and relation with the powers and dominions of the earth.” — p. 509
Jah-hovah . . . is one of the planetary Elohim of . . . Saturn.
see: Morals and Dogma of Freemasonry, comp. Albert Pike, 1871: “The Elohim originally included . . . winged messengers, ascending and descending the vault of Heaven, to communicate the will of God to mankind. . . . The Prophet Amos explicitly asserts that the Israelites, in the desert, worshipped, not Jehovah, but Moloch, or a Star-God, equivalent to Saturn. . . . Yet the astrological character is assigned even to Jehovah.” — p. 509
“To him also, was born a son, Enos . . .”
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And to Seth [Adam’s 3rd son], to him also there was born a son; and he called his name Enos . . .” — p. 6 (Genesis, 4:26)
“. . . then began men to call themselves Jah or Yah-hovah”
see: Charles Bradlaugh, Genesis: Its Authorship and Authenticity, 1882: “[Gen. 4:] 26  ‘Then men began to call on the name of the Lord.’  Cahen reads this: ‘on commenca à nommer par le nom de Jehovah [they began to call themselves by the name of Jehovah].’ . . . Clericus, Michaelis: ‘then they began to call themselves by the name of God.’ ” — p. 151
“I have gotten a man, even Jehovah.”
p/q: John Lightfoot, Sermons, 1822: “. . . these words of Eve, Gen. iv. 1: when Cain was born, she said, ‘I have gotten a man from the Lord.’ . . . (though I should construe it . . . ‘I have gotten a man, even the Lord’ . . .) . . .” — p. 400 (Whole Works, v. 7)
Luther translated the passage one way, the Roman Catholics quite differently.
see: H. P. Laird, “The Ancient Oracle,” July 1886: “That the real value of the Hebrew particle eth is still obscured by uncertainty I may refer to the various translations of the first verse of the fourth chapter of Genesis, ‘And she said I have gotten a man eth Yah-we,’ which Luther translated Ich habe den Mann, den Herrn.  But the Vulgate translated Possedi hominem per Deum, and the authorized English version has it, ‘and said I have gotten a man from the Lord.’  All of these three translations cannot represent the true idea of the Hebrew original.” — p. 309 (Reformed Quarterly Review, v. 33)
Bishop Wordsworth renders it: “Cain — I have gotten Kain . . .”
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “Wordsworth, in a note on 4 Gen. 1, on this passage, says: ‘Cain — I have gotten], — Kain, from Ka’nithi, I have gotten.’ ” — p. 277
“I have measured a man, even Jehovah.”
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “A better and more literal rendering is: ‘. . . I have measured a man, even Jehovah.’  The reading is ka’nithi aish eth Jehovah . . . The word of the text is derived by Wordsworth from ka’nithi, I have gotten. . . . the verbal is kānāh, קנה.  We find this as קנה, a substantive, meaning measuring stick . . .” — p. 277
“Cain . . . is the son of the ‘Lord’ not of Adam . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Cain leads the ascending line, or Macrocosm, for he is the Son of the ‘Lord,’ not of Adam (Genesis iv. 1).  The ‘Lord’ is Adam Kadmon, Cain, the Son of sinful thought, not the progeny of flesh and blood.  Seth on the other hand is the leader of the races of earth, for he is the Son of Adam.” — 2:464
“male and female (Zachar va Nakobeh) created he them . . .”
see: Etymologicon Magnum [by Walter Whiter], 1800: “ ‘Male and Female created he them.’ (Gen. 1. v. 27.)  Zachar unkebah ( זכר ונקבה ).”  “. . . the Hebrew word for a Woman or FemaleNekebah, (‘Male and Female created he them,’) . . .” — pp. 198, 457

— 128 —

The Unknowable . . . in Rig Vedic verse, such as “Nought Was”
see: Max Müller, History of Ancient Sanskrit Literature, 1860:
“ ‘Nor aught nor naught existed . . .
The gods themselves came later into being. —
Who knows from whence this great creation sprang?’ ” — p. 564 (Ṛig-veda, x.129)
The Unknowable . . . called, later on “Parabrahm”
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita” (I & III), Feb. & April 1887: “. . . Parabrahmam is not so associated . . . it is not ego, it is not non-ego, nor is it consciousness . . .”  “Parabrahmam is unknowable . . .” — pp. 302, 432 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
the אין (Ain, nothing, or the “Ain-Soph” of the Kabalists)
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “Above Kether is the Ayin or Ens ( אין ), i.e., Ain, the No-Thing.  ‘It is so named because we do not know, and it is impossible to know, that which there is in this Principle . . .’ ” — p. 127
the “Spirit” (of God) that moves upon the face of the waters
see: K. H. Banerjea, The Arian Witness, 1875: “This is a close approximation to ‘the Spirit of God moving over the face of the waters.’  Manu says: ‘This universe was enveloped in darkness, unperceived, undistinguishable, undiscoverable, unknowable . . .’ ” — p. 128
Genesis, ch. i., v. 2, is placed as verse 1
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “The first veil of negative existence is the AIN, Ain = Negativity. . . .The second veil is the . . . Ain Soph = the Limitless.” — p. 20 (Introduction)
      “It was formless and void, and darkness upon the face of the deep [Gen. 1:2] . . . {the ‘face of (from) the deep (abyss)’ is the countenance formed from Ain Soph, the Limitless One} . . .” — p. 48 & note (Book of Concealed Mystery, i.20)
it is followed by the Elohim “creating the Heaven and the Earth”
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “The third veil is the . . . Ain Soph Aur = the Limitless Light.” — p. 20 (Introduction)
      “(When, therefore, the Divine law beginneth) . . . ‘the Elohim created the substance of the heavens and the substance of the earth.’ ”  “ ‘And the Elohim said, Let there be light, and there was light.’ ” — pp. 46, 48 (Book of Concealed Mystery, i.16, 21)
those Elohim (gods) who have not created the Heavens and the Earth . . .
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “The gods that have not made the heavens and the earth, these shall perish from the earth, and from under the heavens.” — p. 963 (Jeremiah, 10:11)
see: Edward Nares, Remarks on the Version of the New Testament, 1814: “. . . Jeremiah, x. 11.  ‘The Gods that have not made the Heavens and the Earth . . .’ — here the term is Elohim, (allowing for the Chaldee termination . . .) and the verbs and pronouns plural, while he must have intended a reference to the Elohim of Moses that did make the Heavens and Earth . . .” — p. 124 fn.
Manu-Swâyambhuva, who sprang from . . . the “Self-existent”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “MANU. . . . This name belongs to fourteen mythological progenitors of mankind . . . The first of these Manus was Swāyam-bhuva, who sprang from Swayam-bhū, the self-existent.” — p. 199
see: Ordinances of Manu, tr. Burnell, ed. Hopkins, 1884: “This (All) was darkness, imperceptible . . . unknowable . . . Then the self-existent Lord became manifest . . . Waters are called nārāḥ . . . they were his first abode (ayana), he thence is called Nārāyana.”— pp. 1-2 (i.5-6, 10)
Manu-swâyambhuva is Brahmâ, or the Logos
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — III,” April 1887: “. . . Brahma . . . who was called Swayambhuva . . . he commenced the creation of man by forming, or bringing into existence by his own intellectual power, these Maharishis and these Manus. . . . Swayambhuva thus disappeared after commencing the work of evolution . . . but is still the overshadowing Logos . . .” — p. 444 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
Vâch is the daughter of Brahmâ and is named Sata-Rupa, “the hundred-formed”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ŚATA-RŪPĀ.  ‘The hundred-formed.’ . . . she was the daughter of Brahmā . . . She is also called Sāvitrī.” — pp. 286-7
Vâch . . . Savitri . . . the mother of the gods
see: Original Sanskrit Texts, tr. J. Muir, 1868-73: “. . . the word Aditi is given a synonym . . . of vāch, voice . . . she is defined as the mighty mother of the gods.” — 5:35
see: E. Washburn Hopkins, Epic Mythology, 1915: “(. . . sāvitrī here is sā avitrī, ‘guardian and generatrix of pure birth’).”  “Sāvitrī . . . is both the mother of the Vedas . . . and the mother of the initiated regenerate . . .” — p. 86
identical with Eve, “the mother . . . of all living”
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And Adam called his wife’s name Eve {Havvah, that is, Living, or, Life}; because she was the mother of all living.” — p. 4 & fn. (Genesis, 3:20)

— 128-9 —

“When the ternary is taken in the beginning of the Tetragram . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “When the ternary is taken in the beginning of the tetragram, it expresses the divine creation spiritually, i.e., without any carnal sin: taken at its opposite end it expresses the latter; it is feminine.  The name Eve is composed of three letters, that of the primitive or heavenly Adam, is written with one letter, Jod or Yodh; therefore it must not be read Jehovah but Ieva, or Eve.  The Adam of the first chapter is the spiritual, therefore pure androgyne, Adam Kadmon.” — 2:462-3

— 129 —

“When woman issues from the rib of the second Adam . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “When woman issues from the left rib of the second Adam (of dust), the pure Virgo is separated, and falling ‘into generation,’ or the downward cycle, becomes Scorpio, emblem of sin and matter.  While the ascending cycle points at the purely spiritual races, or the ten prediluvian patriarchs (the Pradjāpatis, and Sephiroth) are led on by the creative Deity itself, who is Adam Kadmon or Yodcheva, the lower one is that of the terrestrial races, led on by Enoch or Libra, the seventh; who, because he is half-divine, half-terrestrial, is said to have been taken by God alive.  Enoch, or Hermes, or Libra are one.” — 2:463
יהוה . . . was pronounced Ya-va.
see: Thomas Inman, Ancient Faiths Embodied in Ancient Names, 1868: “. . . the name of Jehovah {Jahve is the form which is supposed to be nearest to the real pronunciation}.” — 1:610 & fn.
Inman suggests that it is . . . from the two words . . . Yaho-Iah
see: D. M. Bennett, The Gods and Religions of Ancient and Modern Times, 1880: “ ‘The very ancient name of God, Yaho . . . written in the Greek Iao, appears . . . to have been an old mystic name of the supreme deity of the Shemites.’ ”  “ ‘The identification of the Iao of the heathen Shemites, with Yaho, or Jehovah, of the Hebrews, is already in Tacitus . . .’ ” — 1:524-5 (“Views of Dr. Inman”)
Punctuated . . . to associate it with the name Adoni
see: J. P. Lange, Genesis, Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, 1869: “. . . the Masorites punctuated the text-name יהוה with the vowels of Adonai . . . where Adonai Jehovah occurs in the text, there they read Adonai Elohim.” — p. 110
Philo Byblus, who gives us the . . . fragment of Sanchoniathon, spelt it . . . ἸΕΥΩ, Javo or Jevo
see: Matthew Bridges, The Testimony of Profane Antiquity, 1825: “In a fragment of Philo Byblius, taken from Sanchoniathon . . . a most remarkable mention is made of the god Jevo . . .” — pp. 224-5
see: Hebrew and English Lexicon, ed. Josiah W. Gibbs, 1824: “. . . a pronunciation which some derive from the ΙΕΥΩ of Philo Byblius . . .” — p. 261
Theodoret says the Samaritans pronounced Yahva, and the Jews Yaho
see: J. P. Lange, Genesis, Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, 1869: “On this point compare the lexicons (Diodorus on the word Jao; the Samaritans, according to Theodoret, Jabe; Jao in Clemens Alex. . . . Reland Jahve) . . .” — p. 110
Gibbs . . . suggests its punctuation . . . as a Hebrew verb, it means “he will — be.”
see: Hebrew and English Lexicon, ed. Josiah W. Gibbs, 1824: “The pronunciation יַהֲוֶה he shall be is supported also by the etymological explanation given by Moses, Ex. 3:14 . . . namely, he who is as he shall be, i.e. the eternal, unchangeable . . .” — p. 261
It was also derived from the Chaldaic verb . . . “to be.”
see: Charles Elliot, Vindication of the Mosaic Authorship of the Pentateuch, 1884: “Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew root hayah (Chaldaic havah . . .), to be, to exist, to live.” — p. 65

— Footnotes

See for comparison Hosea, xii. 6
see: Hebrew and English Lexicon, ed. Josiah W. Gibbs, 1824: “. . . [Jehovah] he who is as he shall be, i.e. the eternal, unchangeable . . . To this interpretation, an allusion is also made Hos. 12:6 . . . he is called or is Jehovah, i.e. the unchangeable.” — p. 261

— 129-30 —

Parkhurst makes the verb הוה to mean . . . “To fall down” . . . “To be, to continue
p/q: John Parkhurst, Hebrew and English Lexicon, 1799: “הוה . . . I apprehend that the primary sense of this Root is, To fall down, subside . . . whence are derived . . . secondary senses of subsisting, being, or continuing . . . Hence likewise the Greek . . . εω  to be.” — p. 155

— 130 —

The aspirate of the word eua (Eva) “to be”
see: Godfrey Higgins, Anacalypsis, 1836: “We ourselves suppress the sound of the aspirate in Eve . . .”  “In Exod. iii. 14, God is called אהוה [’ehyeh, ‘I am’] . . . formed from the root היה eie or הוה eue, which signifies to live, exist, or be.  But הוה eue . . . was the name of Eve . . .” — 1:318, 523
Heve (Eve), which is the feminine of יהוה
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “The verbal היה, or Hāyāh, or E-y-e, means to be, to exist . . . The first becomes Hāvah, or Eve . . . The Deity name, J’hovah, is a compound of two words, viz., י , or Jah, and hovah, or הוה . . . The word Jehovah, Jah-Eve, has the primary significance of hermaphrodite existence or being, as male-female . . .” — p. 8
the same as Hebe, the Grecian goddess of youth
see: François Bertrand, Dictionnaire Universel, 1849: “HÉBÉ, déesse de la jeunesse . . . Hébé ou, comme on prononçait en grec, Ἥβη (Hévé) rappelle le nom d’Eve (Héva), la mère du genre humain.  Ce nom signifie . . . Hava, vivre, en hébreu [Hebe, the goddess of youth . . . Hebe, or as it is pronounced in Greek, Ἥβη (Hévé) reminds one of the name Eve (Heva), the mother of humankind.  This name signifies . . . Hava, to live, in Hebrew].” — 2:1080
Finding in Sanskrit such syllables as Jah and Yah
see: Monier Williams, Sanskrit-English Dictionary, 1872: “ja . . . N. of Vishṇu; also of Śiva . . .”  “ya . . . N. of Yama . . .” — pp. 334, 801
e.g., Jah (navi) “Ganges”
see: W. J. Wilkins, Hindu Mythology, 1882: “Gangā (the Ganges), the chief of the sacred streams of India, whose waters are said to have the power of cleansing from all past, present, and future sins, is believed to be divine . . .”  “. . . one of the many names of Gangā is Jāhnavi, or daughter of Jahnu.” — pp. 383, 389
and Jagan-nâtha, “Lord of the World”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “JAGAN-NĀTHA.  ‘Lord of the world.’  A particular form of Vishṇu, or rather of Kṛishṇa.” — p. 129
Rawlinson . . . confident . . . of an Aryan or Vedic influence on the early mythology of Babylon
p/q: Sir Henry Rawlinson, “Bilingual Readings – Cuneiform and Phœnician,” March 7, 1864: “The proofs of a Vedic, or . . . an Arian, influence on the early mythology of Babylonia, which these comparative lists of the names of the gods supply, appear to me to be of the very highest interest, and in many cases to be of undoubted authenticity.” — p. 230 fn. (Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, v. 1)
There were Brahms and A-brahms . . . before the first Jew had been born.
see: Godfrey Higgins, Anacalypsis, 1836: “. . . when the Israelitish tribe, who were a sect of Brahmins, came into Syria, they would merely say that Abram came. . . . Now suppose the letter א a . . . to mean the, and the word ברם brm to mean the same as the Brahm of India . . .”  “ ‘The Yadus . . . Part of them, say the old Hindu writers, remained in this country . . . while others resided far to the West.’ . . . This emigrating tribe of Yadu or Yuda . . . were no other than the Jews. . . . There is, I think, no difficulty in finding here the Iudai or tribe of Yuda of the Hindoos long before the Jews of Western Syria could have taken that name from one of the sons of Jacob, called Judah . . . because it is clear that they had the epithet long before he was born . . .” — 1:390, 392
“Under the emblematical devices and peculiar phraseology of the priesthood of old . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Under the emblematical devices and peculiar phraseology of the priesthood of old lie latent hints of sciences as yet undiscovered during the present cycle.  Well acquainted as may be a scholar with the hieratic writing and hieroglyphical system of the Egyptians, he must first of all learn to sift their records.  He has to assure himself, compasses and rule in hand, that the picture-writing he is examining fits, to a line, certain fixed geometrical figures which are the hidden keys to such records, before he ventures on an interpretation.” — 1:156
“But there are myths which speak for themselves. . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “But there are myths which speak for themselves.  In this class we may include the double-sexed first creators, of every cosmogony.  The Greek Zeus-Zēn (æther), and Chthonia (the chaotic earth) and Metis (the water), his wives; Osiris and Isis-Latona — the former god representing also ether — the first emanation of the Supreme Deity, Amun, the primeval source of light; the goddess earth and water again; Mithras, the rock-born god, the symbol of the male-mundane fire, or the personified primordial light, and Mithra, the fire-goddess, at once his mother and his wife; the pure element of fire (the active, or male principle) regarded as light and heat, in conjunction with earth and water, or matter (female or passive elements of cosmical generation).” — 1:156

— 131 —

“a case where the umbilical cord was ruptured and perfectly cicatrized” . . .
p/q: François Magendie, Précis Élémentaire de la Physiologie, 1819: “M. Ribes vient d’en observer récemment un cas où le cordon ombilical était rompu et parfaitement cicatrisé.  Comment s’était faite alors la circulation dans cet organe [Ribes has recently discussed an example of this where the umbilical cord was ruptured and perfectly cicatrized (scarred over).  How then did circulation take place in this organ]?” — 2:446
“Nothing is at present known respecting . . . digestion in the fœtus” . . .
p/q: François Magendie, Précis Élémentaire de la Physiologie, 1819: “Rien n’est encore connu touchant l’usage de cette digestion dans le fœtus [Nothing is yet known regarding the use of this (kind of) digestion in the fetus] . . .”  “Que dire sur la nutrition du fœtus?  Les ouvrages de physiologie ne contiennent que des conjectures plus ou moins vagues sur ce point [What can one say about the nutrition of the fetus?  The works on physiology contain only more or less vague conjectures on this point] . . .” — 2:447, 449

— 131-2 —

“Concerning the rise and development of the fuctional activities of the embryo . . .”
p/q: Michael Foster, A Text Book: Physiology, 1880: “Concerning the rise and development of the functional activities of the embryo, our knowledge is almost a blank.  We know scarcely anything about the various steps by which the primary fundamental qualities of the protoplasm of the ovum are differentiated into the complex phenomena which we have attempted in this book to expound.” — p. 699

— 132 —

those of the later races were born androgynous
see: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “. . . traditions of the human race indicate a period when . . . ‘Our nature of old was not the same as it is now.  It was androgynous; the form and name partaking of and being common to both the male and the female.’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
Think of Kasyapa, the Vedic sage, and the most prolific of creators. . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “KAŚYAPA.  A Vedic sage . . . authorities agree in assigning to him a large part in the work of creation. . . . he was the son of Marīchi, the son of Brahmā, and he was father of Vivaswat, the father of Manu, the progenitor of mankind.” — p. 153
the father of the Nagas, or Serpents . . . semi-divine beings which have a human face . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “NĀGA. . . . A mythical semi-divine being, having a human face with the tail of a serpent . . . The race of Nāgas is said to be a thousand in number, and to have sprung from Kadru, the wife of Kaśyapa, for the purpose of peopling Pātāla, or the regions below the earth . . .” — p. 213
Pâtâla, which is undeniably America
see: W. S. Blacket, Researches into the Lost Histories of America, 1884: “. . . there are many extracts, which disclose the fact, that, in olden times, there must have been intercourse between India and America.”  “. . . in the Vishnu Purana . . . [is] an account of the Patalas, which will be hereafter identified with other parts of North America . . .”  “There is every reason to believe, that the mound cities of North America are described in the records of the ancient world . . .” — pp. 67, 68, 166
see: James Fergusson, Tree and Serpent Worship, 1868: “. . . if we may trust the antiquaries of the United States, there are great serpent mounds formed of earth, 1,000 feet long or more, which would seem to prove that . . . a race of Serpent Worshippers occupied their places, and they have been the ancestors of the Toltecs.” — p. 38
there was a Naga-Dwipa, one of the seven divisions of Bhârata-Varsha . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The Nāgas, or a people bearing the same name, are historical, and have left many traces behind them. . . . Nāga-dwīpa was one of the seven divisions of Bhārata-varsha. . . . There are various speculations as to who and what they were, but it seems clear that they were a race distinct from the Hindus.” — p. 213

— 133 —

“a solitary hermaphrodite”
p/q: H. C. Bastian, The Beginnings of Life, 1872: “These [first] ‘species’ are represented either by solitary hermaphrodite individuals, by two sexually-distinct individuals, or by a series of transitional and derivative individuals . . .” — 2:637
all the primitive forms . . . “still retained the power . . . of A-Sexual multiplication”
p/q: H. C. Bastian, The Beginnings of Life, 1872: “. . . all the earlier forms are sexless and still retain the power of undergoing processes of asexual multiplication . . .” — 2: 637
“that a large part of the vegetable creation exhibits the phenomenon of bisexuality . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “That a large part of the vegetable creation exhibit the phenomenon of bisexuality is patent to every one.  In the Linnæn classification, all plants are so enumerated, except the monœcious and diœcious . . . These exceptions, it is palpable, by no means include the superior families.  ‘The pumpkin, squash, and cucumber . . . are monœcious, having staminate flowers apart from the pistillate blossoms; and others, like the hemp, Lombardy poplar, and ailanthus, have also duplicated bodies one being male and the other female.’ ” — p. 112 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
in insect life, the moth generates a worm . . . “Taurus Draconem genuit . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “In insect life, the moth generates a worm, and the worm becomes a moth, as in the Mysteries the great secret was expressed — Taurus draconem genuit, et Taurum draco [the Bull begat the Dragon, and the Dragon the Bull].” — p. 112 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
The coral-producing family, which according to Agassiz . . .
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “The polyps, or coral-producing family, which, according to Agassiz, has spent many hundreds or thousands of years, during the present geological period, in building out the peninsula of Florida from the main land . . . produce their offspring from themselves like the buds and ramifications of a tree.” — pp. 112-13 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
Bees are somewhat in the same line . . .
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “Bees are somewhat in the same line. . . . The aphids, or plant-lice, keep house like Amazons, and virgin parents perpetuate the race for ten successive generations.” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)

— 133-4 —

“Our nature of old was not the same as it is now. . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “Plato, in the ‘Banquet,’ has preserved to us the discourse of Aristophanes on the subject.  ‘Our nature of old was not the same as it is now.  It was androgynous . . .’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
see: Plato, Works, v. 3, tr. George Burges, 1850: “. . . our nature of old was not the same as it is now. . . . It was then man-woman {hermaphrodite}, whose form and name partook of and was common to both the male and the female. . . .The bodies thus were round, and the manner of their running was circular . . .” — pp. 508-9 & fn. (The Banquet, § 16)

— 134 —

“They were terrible in force and strength . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883:  “ ‘They were terrible in force and strength, and had prodigious ambition.  Hence Zeus (Jove) divided each of them into two, making them weaker; Apollo, under his direction, closed up the skin.’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
Meshia and Meshiane were but a single individual . . . “They also taught . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “With the old Persians, Meshia and Meshiane were but a single individual.  They also taught that man was the product of the Tree of Life, growing in androgynous pairs, till they were separated at a subsequent modification of the human form.” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
In the Toleduth (generation) of Adam . . .
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “The accounts given in the book of Genesis appear to imply that man was created double-sexed.  In the fifth chapter it reads: ‘This is the book of the generations (Hebrew, toleduth) of Adam . . .’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
“God created (bara, brought forth) man in his image . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “. . . Genesis i. 27: ‘God created (bara, brought forth) man in his image, the image of God created he him, male and female created he them.’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
“The Elohim (Gods) brought forth from themselves . . . male and female . . .”
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “. . . the Deity is both masculine and feminine. . . . Again (v. 27), how could Adam be made in the image of the Elohim, male and female, unless the Elohim were male and female also?” — p. 21 (Introduction)
“the God possessing the double fecundity of the two sexes”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “In the Hermetic books intelligence is declared to be ‘God possessing the double fecundity of the two sexes.’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)

— Footnotes

four beings who “had the likeness of a man” . . .
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And I looked, and, behold . . . a great cloud, with a fire infolding itself . . . And out of the midst thereof came the likeness of four living creatures . . . they had the likeness of a man. . . . Now as I beheld the living creatures, behold . . . their appearance and their work was as it were a wheel within a wheel.” — pp. 1035-6 (Ezekiel, 1:4-5, 15-16)
“When they went they went upon their four sides . . .”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “When they went, they went upon their four sides . . . and the wheels were lifted up beside them; for the spirit of the living creatures was in the wheels.” — p. 1036 (Ezekiel, 1:17, 20)
Eugibinus . . . and the Rabbis . . . taught that “Adam had two faces . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “Eugibinus, among Christian authors, and the rabbis Samuel, Menasseh ben-Israel, and Maimonides . . . [were] in favor of this interpretation.  ‘Adam . . . had two faces and one person, and from the beginning he was both male and female — male on one side and female on the other; but afterwards the parts were separated.’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
“Thou has fashioned me behind and before” . . .
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “The 139th psalm, by David . . . was cited in evidence.  The rabbi Jeremiah ben-Eleazer, on the authority of the fifth verse, ‘Thou has fashioned me behind and before,’ argued that the primeval form of mankind was androgynous.” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
the union of Chochmah, Wisdom, with Binah, Intelligence, or Jehovah, the Demiurge
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “. . . Hakmoh [Ḥokmāh], or Wisdom, is united with the Demiurge, Jehovah, in the eighth chapter of the Proverbs of Solomon.” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
“Oh, ye simple, understand Wisdom; and ye fools, be of an understanding heart.”
p/q: The Holy Bible, with Notes by Chr. Wordsworth, 1876:
“Doth not Wisdom {chocmah} cry? . . .
  O ye simple, understand wisdom:
  And, ye fools, be ye of an understanding heart. . . .
  I wisdom dwell with prudence . . .
  I am understanding [Binah] . . .” — 4:18-19 & fn. (Proverbs, 8:1, 5, 12, 14)
psyche . . . of which St. James says that it is “earthly, sensual, and devilish”
see: Israel P. Warren, The Parousia, 1879: “ ‘. . . sensual — Gr. psychical’ . . . ‘We have,’ says Alford, ‘no English word for ψυχικός . . . The psyche is the center of the personal being; the “I” of each individual.  It is in each man bound to the spirit, man’s higher part, and to the body, man’s lower part; drawn upwards by the one, downwards by the other.’ . . . The same sense is apparent in James 3:15, ‘This wisdom descendeth not from above, but is earthly, psychical, devilish.’ ” — p. 229

— 135 —

“Zeus is male, Zeus is an immortal maid.”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “ ‘Zeus is a male, Zeus is an immortal maid,’ is asserted in the Orphic hymn, which was chanted in the Mysteries.” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
The Egyptian Ammon was the goddess Neïth . . .
see: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “The Egyptians blended the goddess Neith with Amon in the creation . . . Some of the statues of Jupiter have female breasts, and representations of Venus-Aphrodité give her a beard . . .” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
Ila, the goddess, is also Su-Dyumna, the god . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “SU-DYUMNA.  Son of the Manu Vaivaswata.  At his birth he was a female, Ilā, but was afterwards changed into a male and called Su-dyumna.” — p. 306
“The name Adam . . . or man, itself implies this double form of existence. . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “The name Adam, or man, itself implies this double form of existence.  It is identical with Athamas or Thomas (Tamil, Tam), which is rendered by the Greek didumos, a twin.  If, therefore, the first woman was formed subsequently to the first man, she must, as a logical necessity, be ‘taken out of man.’  Accordingly we read: ‘And the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam . . . and He took one of his sides and closed up the flesh . . . and the side which the Lord God had taken from man, made He a woman.’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
“The Hebrew word . . . is Tzala, which bears the translation we have given . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “The Hebrew word here used is tzala, which bears the translation which we have given.  It is easy to trace this legend in Berosus, who says that Thalatth (the Omaroca, or Lady of Urka), was the beginning of the creation.  She was also Telita, the queen of the moon . . .” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
“The two twin births of Genesis . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “The two memorable twin-births of Genesis, that of Cain and Abel, and of Esau and Jacob, shadow the same idea.  The name Hebel is the same as Eve, and his characteristics seem to be feminine.  ‘Unto thee shall be his desire,’ said the Lord to Cain; ‘and thou shalt rule over him.’  The same language had been uttered to Eve.  ‘Thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee.’ ” — pp. 113-14 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
a “world . . . which is not subject like our own to the vicissitudes of seasons . . .”
p/q: Camille Flammarion, La Pluralité des Mondes Habités, 1869: “. . . Jupiter . . . Ce monde n’est point soumis comme le nôtre aux vicissitudes des saisons ni aux brusques alternatives de la température; un éternel printemps l’enrichit de ses trésors [Jupiter . . . This world is not subjected like ours to the changes of the seasons, nor to the abrupt alterations of temperature; an eternal spring enriches it with its treasures].” — p. 71

— 136 —

“presentiments” . . . “frequently the outcome of the wisdom . . .”
p/q: Louis Figuier, The Day After Death, 1874: “These prejudices, these presentiments are frequently the outcome of the wisdom and the observation of an infinite number of generations of men.” — p. 23

— 136-7 —

a tradition which has an uniform and universal existence . . .”
p/q: Louis Figuier, The Day After Death, 1874: “A tradition which has a uniform and universal existence, has all the weight of scientific testimony.” — p. 23

— Footnotes

“Applying now the researches of Dr. Andrews to the conditions of Solar existence . . .”
p/q: Matthieu Williams, “The Sun’s Atmosphere,” April 4, 1884: “Applying now the researches of Dr. Andrews to the conditions of solar existence . . . I conclude that the sun has no nucleus, either solid, liquid, or gaseous, but is composed of dissociated matter in the critical state, surrounded, first by a flaming envelope, due to the recombination of the dissociated matter, and outside this, another envelope of vapours, due to this combination.” — p. 218 (Knowledge, v. 5)
“when 88° is reached, the boundary between liquid and gas vanished . . .”
p/q: Matthieu Williams, “Solids, Liquids, and Gases,” Dec. 9, 1881: “Then 88° is reached, and the boundary between liquid and gas vanishes; liquid and gas have blended into one mysterious intermediate fluid; an indefinite fluctuating something is there filling the whole of the tube — an etherialised liquid or a visible gas.  Hold a red-hot poker between your eye and the light; you will see an upflowing wavy movement of what appears like liquid air.  The appearance of the hybrid fluid in the tube resembles this, but is sensibly denser, and evidently stands between the liquid and gaseous states of matter, as pitch or treacle stands between solid and liquid . . .” — p. 110 (Knowledge, v. 1)
The temperature at which this occurs has been named by Dr. Andrews . . .
p/q: Matthieu Williams, “Solids, Liquids, and Gases,” Dec. 9, 1881: “The temperature at which this occurs has been named by Dr. Andrews the ‘critical temperature;’ here the gaseous and liquid states are ‘continuous’ and it is probable that all other substances capable of existing in both states have their own particular critical temperatures.” — p. 110 (Knowledge, v. 1)
Our notions of solids, liquids, and gases are derived from our experiences . . .”
p/q: Matthieu Williams, “Solids, Liquids, and Gases,” Dec. 23, 1881: “Our notions of solids, liquids, and gases are derived from our experiences of the state of matter here upon this earth.  Could we be removed to another planet, they would be curiously changed.  On Mercury water would rank as one of the condensible gases, on Mars, as a fusible solid, but what on Jupiter?” — p. 157 (Knowledge, v. 1)
“Recent observations justify us in regarding this as a miniature sun . . .”
p/q: Matthieu Williams, “Solids, Liquids, and Gases,” Dec. 23, 1881: “Recent observations justify us in regarding this as a miniature sun, with an external envelope of cloudy matter, apparently of partially condensed water, but red-hot, or probably still hotter within.  His vaporous atmosphere is evidently of enormous depth, and the force of gravitation being on his visible outer surface 2½ times greater than that on our earth’s surface, the atmospheric pressure in descending below this visible surface must soon reach that at which the vapour of water would be brought to its critical condition.  Therefore we may infer that the oceans of Jupiter are neither of frozen, liquid, nor gaseous water, but are oceans or atmospheres of critical water.  If any fish-birds swim or fly therein they must be very critically organised.” — p. 157 (Knowledge, v. 1)
As the whole mass of Jupiter is 300 times greater than that of Earth . . .
p/q: Matthieu Williams, “Solids, Liquids, and Gases,” Dec. 23, 1881: “As the whole mass of Jupiter is 300 times greater than that of the earth, and its compressing energy towards the centre proportional to this, its materials, if similar to those of the earth and no hotter, would be considerably more dense, and the whole planet would have a higher specific gravity, but we know by the movement of its satellites that, instead of this, its specific gravity is less than a fourth of that of the earth.  This justifies the conclusion that it is intensely hot, for even hydrogen, if cold, would become denser than Jupiter under such pressure.” — p. 157 (Knowledge, v. 1)
“As all elementary substances may exist as solids, liquids, or gases . . .”
p/q: Matthieu Williams, “Solids, Liquids, and Gases,” Dec. 23, 1881: “As all elementary substances may exist as solids, liquids, or gases, or, critically, according to the conditions of temperature and pressure, I am justified in hypothetically concluding that Jupiter is neither a solid, a liquid, nor a gaseous planet, but a critical planet, or an orb composed internally of dissociated elements in the critical state, and surrounded by a dense atmosphere of their vapours, and those of some of their compounds, such as water.  The same reasoning applies to Saturn and the other large and rarefied planets.” — p. 157 (Knowledge, v. 1)

— 137 —

“In the Tzalam (shadow image) of Elohim . . . was made Adam (man) . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘And this is the World which is not always in continuance.  (Zohar, Cremona Ed. iii, 76a; Brody Ed. iii, 159a.)  Like this it is said: ‘In the Tzelem shadow image, of Elohim, He made Adam (man).’ ” — p. 420
“From one Soul, that of all, spring all the Souls . . .”
see: Iamblichus, On the Mysteries, tr. Thomas Taylor, 1821: “. . . all beings proceed from, and are comprehended in, the first being . . . all souls from one first soul . . . from which both they and all their depending series are unfolded into light.” — pp. xii-xiii (Introduction)
      “. . . the soul, which ranks as a whole, presides over all the mundane body {Hence Iamblichus (apud Stob. Eclog. Phys. p. 114), says . . . ‘the soul which ranks as a whole . . . contains body in itself ’} . . .” — p. 226 & fn. (v.2)
“These souls undergo many transformations . . .”
p/q: Ignaz von Döllinger, Paganisme et Judaïsme, 1858: “. . . les âmes . . . sont renvoyées sur la terre où elles subissent beaucoup de transformations.  Rampant d’abord, ils se changent successivement en animaux aquatiques, en quadrupèdes, en oiseaux et finalement en hommes [the souls . . . are sent back to earth where they undergo many transformations.  While creeping at first, they successively change into water animals, into quadrupeds, into birds and finally into human beings] . . .” — 2:288

— 137-8 —

“On reaching that status of man, the Souls receive the principle of . . . immortalilty . . .”
p/q: Ignaz von Döllinger, Paganisme et Judaïsme, 1858: “. . . ‘dans ce dernier état ils reçoivent le germe de l’immortalité en devenant des génies et ils parviennent ensuite dans le chœur des dieux’ {Ap. Stob. Eclog. Phys.} [in this latest phase they receive the seed of immortality by becoming spirits and they then partake of the choir of the gods].” — 1:288 & fn.

— 138 —

The ever-blooming lands of the Second Continent . . .
see: William F. Warren, Paradise Found, 1885: “. . . geologists and paleontologists . . . in their opinion . . . a ‘continent’ once existed within the Arctic Circle of which at present only vestiges remain.”  “. . . there have been and might be again conditions which could convert the ice-clad Arctic regions into blooming Paradises.”  “The old, old stories of a Golden-Age . . . of the Hyperborean Macrobii, of the insurrection of the Titans, of the destruction of mankind by a Flood, are history once more.” — pp. 71-2, 102, 403
in the Rig Veda, Ida . . . is called the Instructress of Vaivasvata Manu . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In the Ṛig-veda Iḍā is . . . personified as the goddess of speech.  She is called the instructress of Manu . . . According to Sāyaṇa, she is the goddess presiding over the earth.  A legend in the Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa represents her as springing from a sacrifice which Manu performed for the purpose of obtaining offspring.” — p. 122
In the Purânas . . . she is Vaivasvata’s daughter, yet the wife of Budha . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In the Purāṇas she is daughter of the Manu Vaivaswata, wife of Budha . . .” — p. 123
Budha (Wisdom), the illegitimate son of the Moon (Soma) and . . . Tara
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Soma . . . carried off Tārā, the wife of Bṛihaspati . . .”  “. . . [Brahmā] compelled Soma to restore Tārā to her husband. . . . she was delivered of a son . . . [Brahmā] addressing Tārā, said: ‘. . . is this the child of Bṛihaspati? or of Soma?’  ‘Of Soma,’ said Tārā . . . the lord of the constellations . . . embraced his son, and said: ‘Well done, my boy!  Verily, thou art wise.’  And, hence, his name was Budha {‘He who knows.’}.” — 4:2, 3-4 & fn. (iv.6)

— 139 —

The story as told in the “Mahabhârata” . . . Vaivasvata was engaged in devotion . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The story, as told in the Mahā-bhārata, represents [Vaivasvata] Manu as engaged in devotion by the side of a river, and the fish craving his protections from the bigger fish.  Manu placed the fish in a glass vase, but it grew larger and larger till the ocean alone could contain it.  Then it warned Manu of the coming flood . . .” — p. 200
“Matsya Avatar,” the first Avatar of Vishnu . . . orders a ship to be built . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “. . . the fish [Matsya] Avatāra . . . directed Manu to construct a ship and to resort to him when the flood should rise.” — p. 35
      “[In the] story, as told in the Mahā-bhārata . . . [Vishṇu] directed him to build a ship and to embark with the seven Ṛishis.” — p. 200
The ship or ark — navis . . . the symbol of the female generative principle . . .
see: George Oliver, The History of Initiation, 1841: “. . . the ark, or female principle, with the whole human race in her womb, floated on the surface of the diluvian waters . . .” — p. 180 fn.
      “. . . [it] pointed to the great father and mother of the renovated world; the egg and lunette [moon-shaped ark] symbolized the generative principle, in the persons of the same progenitors; for the moon and egg were equally symbols of the ark from which they issued when they became parents of a new race {‘In memory of the ark, the ancients . . . sometimes even built their temples in the form of ships. . . . Hence the Greeks designated a temple and a ship by the very same word, Naus or Naos; and hence . . . we still call the body of a church . . . the nave . . .’}.” — pp. 72-3 & fn.

— Footnotes

Ea, the first, was the God of Wisdom . . . and of the deep
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “Ea . . . was the god not only of the deep, but also of wisdom.  Ancient legends affirmed that . . . the entrance to the deep or ocean-stream — had been the mysterious spot from whence the first elements of culture and civilisation had been brought to Chaldæa.” — p. 131
the great “God of Light”
see: A. H. Sayce, Babylonia and Assyria, 1899: “Ea, the god of Eridu, was a god of light and beneficence . . . He had given man all the elements of civilization; rising each morning out of his palace under the waters of the deep, he taught them the arts and sciences . . .” — p. 3
he was identified with Oannes . . . the man-fish who rose out of the Persian Gulf
see: A. H. Sayce, Babylonia and Assyria, 1899: “The Ea of the cuneiform text seems to be the Oannes . . . who was said to have risen out of the waters of the Persian Gulf, bringing with him the elements of civilization . . .” — p. 195
See Part. II. § “The Holy of Holies.”
see: “The ‘Holy of Holies.’  Its Degradation” : “The ark is the navi-form Argha of the Mysteries.  Parkhurst . . . in his Greek dictionary . . . explains it thus: — Ἀρχὴ in this application . . . had the meaning of the emblem of the female generative power, the Arg or Arca, in which the germ of all nature was supposed to float or brood on the great abyss during the interval which took place after every mundane cycle.’ ” — SD 2:459-60
the Moon became a male god . . . Nannar, and Sin
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “With the growth of the Semitic power in Babylonia, the influence of the Moon-god of Ur became greater and more extensive.  Nannar was now invoked as Sin . . . His worshippers invoked him as the father and creator of both gods and men.” — pp. 164-5
the son of Mulil, the older Bel . . . “Lord of Ghosts”
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “In a list of the titles of Ea, we find it expressly stated that he is one with ‘Mul-lil the strong.’ . . . Mul-lil signifies ‘the lord of the ghost-world.’ ”  “But long before this account of the Deluge was composed . . . the Accadian Mul-lil had become the Semitic Bel.”  “He was distinguised from the younger Bel of Babylon, Bel-Merodach, as . . . ‘the older Baal’ {‘the older Bel’ . . . may be a form of Mul-lil} . . .” — pp. 145, 147, 148
the god of Nipoor (Niffer) . . . caused the waters of the Flood . . .
p/q: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “As ‘the lord of heaven and earth,’ Ea was . . . Mul-lil, the supreme god and demiurge of Nipur (the modern Niffer).”  “. . . it was he who caused the waters of the flood to descend from heaven, and who designed the destruction of all mankind.” — pp. 145, 146
for which Xisuthrus would not allow him to approach his altar
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “ ‘When Mul-lil . . . saw the ship (of Xisuthros) [the ark] . . . (he cried).  “Let no man remain alive in the great destruction.” ’  It was then that Ea came forward with words of wisdom . . . so that Xisuthros and his companions were allowed to escape . . . when inviting the other gods to his sacrifice after his descent from the ark, he specially excepted the god of Nipur.  ‘Let the (other) gods come to my altar, but let Mul-lil not come . . .’ ” — pp. 146-7
Nipoor . . . the centre whence the Chaldean (black) magic spread . . .
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “. . . just as Eridu in southern Babylonia was the primitive seat of the worship of the Chaldean culture-god . . . Nipur in northern Babylonia . . . concerned itself with ghosts and demons . . . It was, in fact, the home of that belief in magic, and in the various spirits exorcised by the magician, which left so deep an impression upon the religion of early Babylonia . . .” — p. 150
Ur was the chief seat of the worship of the Moon-god . . .
p/q: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “The chief seat, however, of the worship of the Moon-god was not Nipur but Ur . . . Already in the oldest documents . . . he is termed ‘the first-born of Mul-lil.’ ”  “Now Abraham . . . migrated from Ur to Harran. . . . Like Ur, Harran also was a city of the Moon-god . . . Harran was as closely connected with Babylonian history and religion as was Ur itself.” — pp. 155, 163

— 140 —

Vaivasvata produces a daughter and begets from her the race of Manu
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “IḌĀ. . . . A legend in the Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa represents her as springing from a sacrifice which Manu performed for the purpose of obtaining offspring. . . . Manu lived with her, and . . . begat upon her the race of Manu.” — pp. 122-3
(Ida or Ila) the wife of Budha . . . referring to the events of the Atlantean flood . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In the Purāṇas she is daughter of the Manu Vaivaswata, wife of Budha . . . The Manu Vaivaswata, before he had sons, instituted a sacrifice to Mitra and Varuṇa . . . the result was the birth of a daughter, Iḍā or Ilā.” — p. 123
see: A. A. Macdonell, Vedic Mythology, 1897: “The SB. . . . relates a legend of how Manu was saved in a ship from a deluge, which swept away all other creatures . . . Manu is then said to have become the progenitor of mankind through his daughter Iḍā.” — p. 139
“The Seven great Rishis, the four preceding Manus, partaking of my essence . . .”
p/q: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — III,” April 1887: “In speaking of himself Krishna says, (chapter x, verse 6): — ‘The seven great Rishis, the four preceding Manus, partaking of my nature, were born from my mind: from them sprang [was born] the human race and the world.’ ” — p. 444 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
“There is a peculiarity to which I must call your attention. . . .”
p/q: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — III,” April 1887: “There is a peculiarity in this passage to which I must call your attention.  He speaks here of four Manus.  Why does he speak of four?  We are now in the seventh Manwantara — that of Vaivaswata.  If he is speaking of the past Manus, he ought to speak of six, but he only mentions four.  In some commentaries an attempt has been made to interpret this in a peculiar manner.  The word ‘Chatwaraha’ is separated from the word ‘Manavaha’ and is made to refer to Sanaka, Sanandana, Sanatkumara and Sanatsujata, who were also included among the mind-born sons of Prajapati.” — p. 444 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
“But this interpretation will lead to a most absurd conclusion . . .”
p/q: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — III,” April 1887: “But this interpretation will lead to a most absurd conclusion, and make the sentence contradict itself.  The persons alluded to in the text have a qualifying clause in the sentence.  It is well known that Sanaka and the other three refused to create, though the other sons had consented to do so; therefore, in speaking of those persons from whom humanity has sprung into existence, it would be absurd to include these four also in the list.  The passage must be interpreted without splitting the compound into two nouns.  The number of Manus will be then four, and the statement would contradict the Puranic account, though it would be in harmony with the occult theory.” — p. 444 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
“You will recollect that . . . we are now in the Fifth Root-Race. . . .”
p/q: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — III,” April 1887: “You will recollect that Mr. Sinnett has stated that we are now in the fifth root race.  Each root race is considered as the santhathi [progeny] of a particular Manu.  Now the fourth root race has passed, or in other words there have been four past Manus.” — p. 444 (The Theosophist, v. 8)

— 141 —

Stockwell and Croll enumerate some half dozen Glacial Periods . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “. . . the theory that epochs of glaciation on the northern hemisphere have been caused by extreme eccentricity of the earth’s orbit. . . . The last occurring epoch of maximum eccentricity, according to Stockwell’s calculations (supplemented by Croll’s) were, before 1800 A.D., 100,000 years . . . Professor Croll regards the last glacial period as extending from 240,000 to 80,000 years ago.  The maximum of 850,000 years, he thinks, fell in the Miocene period . . .” — pp. 368-9
the last peninsulas of Atlantis . . .
see: Francis Wilford, “On Egypt and Other Countries Adjacent to the Nile,” 1799: “Several divisions of the old continent were made by different persons . . . The most ancient of them is mentioned in the Purānas . . . where that continent is divided into seven dwīpas, or countries with water on two sides; so that . . . they may signify either islands or peninsulas.  They are said to be wholly surrounded by a vast ocean, beyond which lie the region and mountains of Atala; whence most probably the Greeks derived their notion of the celebrated Atlantis . . .” — p. 300 (Asiatic Researches, v. 3)
island mentioned by Plato
see: Plato, Timaeus, ed. R. D. Archer-Hind, 1888: “. . . there had been exceeding great earthquakes and floods . . . and in like manner did the island Atlantis sink beneath the sea . . .” — p. 81 (§ 25A)
The little deluge, the traces of which Baron Bunsen found in Central Asia . . .
see: Christian C. J. Bunsen, Egypt’s Place in Universal History, 1848-67: “The period of the immigration from Western Asia is, at all events, antediluvian, that is to say, anterior to the great catastrophe which, about ten thousand years before our era, in the most suitable epoch of the temperature of the northern hemisphere, changed the climate and surface of Central Asia . . .” — 5:88
“The Incas, seven in number, have repeopled the Earth after the deluge”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “ ‘Les Incas, au nombre de sept, ont repeuplé la terre {Coste, 1. IV, p. 19}’ [The Incas, seven in number, have repeopled the earth {Acosta, 1. IV, 19}] . . .” — 3:90
see: Joseph de Acosta, Natural and Moral History of the Indies, tr. Grimston [1604], ed. Markham, 1880: “. . . the world had beene preserved, restored, and peopled by these Yncas . . . seven of them came foorth of the cave . . . all other men owed them tribute . . . as their progenitors.” — 2:428 (vi.19)
twice seven companions and the divine bird which preceded the boat of the Aztecs
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . les Mexicains . . . Humboldt nous montre ‘un radeau portant un homme, une femme et leurs quinze compagnons, protégés par l’oiseau divin qui précède la marche des Aztèques’ [(with) the Mexicans . . . Humboldt shows us ‘a raft carrying a man, a woman and their fifteen companions, protected by the divine bird who precedes the journey of the Aztecs’] . . .” — 3:90
reminiscence of Moses, who . . . mentioned fifteen grandsons of Noah . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . ‘un radeau portant un homme, une femme et leurs quinze compagnons’ {Moïse donne quinze petits-fils à Noé} [‘a raft carrying a man, a woman and their fifteen companions’ {Moses gives Noah fifteen grandsons}] . . .” — 3:90 & fn.
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “Now these are the generations of the sons of Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth: and unto them were [16] sons born after the flood. . . . By these were the isles of the Gentiles divided . . .” — p. 11 (Genesis, 10:1, 5)
Xisuthrus, the Chaldean Noah, is saved and translated alive to heaven
see: George Stanley Faber, The Origin of Pagan Idolatry, 1816: “. . . the same story is told of the Babylonian Xisuthrus . . . When the vessel, in which he had been preserved from the fury of the deluge, grounded . . . [he] offered sacrifices to the immortal gods.  After these rites had been duly performed, Xisuthrus . . . suddenly disappeared. . . . Xisuthrus is translated [to heaven] from the summit of an Armenian mountain . . .” — 2:45-6
like Enoch — with the seven gods, the Kabirim, or the seven Titans
see: George Stanley Faber, The Origin of Pagan Idolatry, 1816: “Mr. Baxter . . . argues, that he [Canac] must be the Enoch or Chanoch of Scripture: Mr. Bryant . . . supposes him to be the patriarch Noah in his antediluvian state.”  “. . . says Taliesin in his poem The spoils of the deep . . . we entered into the deep; excepting seven, none have returned from Caer Sidi. . . . the inclosure of Sidi is the Ark . . . the seven, who alone return with him in safety from the deep where all the rest of mankind had perished, are his family, the same as the seven Cabiri or seven Titans . . .” — 2:47, 48-9 fn.

— Footnotes

Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge,” xviii; “American Journal of Science,” . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “This theory [of glacial periods] has been carefully expounded by Professor Croll {Croll: Climate and Time}. . . . according to Stockwell’s calculations {Stockwell, Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge, xviii; R. W. McFarland, Amer. Jour. Sci., III, xi, 456} . . .” — p. 368 & fns.

— 141-2 —

Sanchoniathon makes the Aletæ or Titans . . . contemporary with Agruerus . . .
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “. . . Sanchoniatho makes the Aletæ or Titans contemporary with Agruerus the great god of Phenicia, whom I have shewn to be the same as the Patriarch Noah.” — 2:240

— 142 —

the name of “Titan” is derived from Tit-Ain — “the fountains of the chaotic abyss”
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “. . . the primitive Titans . . . derived their name from Tit-Ain, the fountains of the chaotic abyss . . .” — 2:240
(Tit-Theus, or Tityus is “the divine deluge”)
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “. . . along with the Titans, the poet [Virgil] stations the huge monster Tityus. . . . Tityus derives his name from the same root as Titan, and is . . . a personification of the deluge.” — 1:325, 326
They are the sons of Kronos . . . and Rhea . . .
see: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “. . . the Noëtic Titans . . . are described as the offspring of Rhea . . . and Cronus . . . [they] consist of seven persons, who, with the head of their family, Agruerus or Cronus, exactly complete the arkite ogdoad . . . It has likewise been shewn, that Agruerus and Sydyk [Tsaddīq] are the same; and consequently that the seven Cabiri, the sons of Sydyk, are the same as the seven Titans.” — 2:241
“I have no doubt of the seven Titans and Kabiri being the same as the seven Rishis . . .”
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “I have no doubt of the seven Titans or Cabiri being the same also as the seven Rishis of the Hindoo mythology, who are said to have escaped in a boat along with Menu [Manu] the head of their family.” — 1:130 fn.
“The Hindoos, in their wild legends have variously perverted the history . . .”
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “The Hindoos in their wild legends, have variously perverted the history of the Noachidæ, yet it is remarkable, that they seem religiously to have adhered to the number seven . . .” — 1:130-1 fn.
Wilford very judiciously observes: that perhaps the seven Manus . . .
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “. . . hence Captain Wilford very judiciously observes that ‘perhaps the seven Menus, the seven Brahmadicas, and the seven Rishis, are the same, and make only seven individual persons.  The seven Brahmadicas were prajapatis, or lords of the prajas, or creatures.  From them mankind were born, and they are probably the same with the seven Menus — These seven grand ancestors of the human race were — created for the purpose of replenishing the earth with inhabitants.’ Asiat. Res. vol. v. p. 246.” — 1:131 fn.
“the mutual resemblance of the Kabirs, the Titans, the Rishis . . .”
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “The mutual resemblance of the Cabiri, the Titans, the Rishis, and the Noëtic family, is too striking to be the effect of mere accident.” — 1:131 fn.

— Footnotes

Agruerus is Kronos . . .
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Agruerus . . . was esteemed, in an especial manner, even the greatest of Gods.”  “Since Cronus is the same person as Sydyk, the seven Titans will of course be the same as the seven Cabiri; and since Agruerus is also the same person as Cronus or Sydyk, we shall see the exact propriety of Sanchoniatho’s assertion, that Agruerus and his family were known by the general name of Titans . . .”  “These [Titans] . . . are said by Sanchoniatho . . . to be the children of Cronus or Agruerus, the scriptural Noah . . .” — 1:35, 80 fn., 169
connected with Argha, the Moon or Ark
see: George Stanley Faber, The Origin of Pagan Idolatry, 1816: “The divided egg is one of the forms of the Indian Argha; the vessel, which is used in every sacred rite, and which is venerated as a copy of the navicular Argha in which the great father sailed over the waters of the deluge.”  “This navicular form, which the Moon assumes in her first and last quarters, rendered her a peculiarly fit astronomical symbol of the Ark . . .” — 1:192, 195
Noah is mythologically one with Saturn
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Noah and his triple offspring are continually represented to us under the character of an ancient diety and his three sons; and yet every one of these three sons is . . . confounded with his father.  Thus Saturn, Jupiter, Neptune, and Pluto, taken conjointly are evidently Noah, Ham, Japhet, and Shem.  This remark will equally apply to the Cronus of Sanchoniatho, and his three sons . . .” — 1:15-16
Titans . . . sons of Kronos, and seven in number . . . fire-worshippers . . .
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Sanchoniatho closes the account, which he gives of Agruerus . . . by asserting that he and his contemporaries were the persons known by the name of Aletæ, or fire worshippers, and Titans, or diluvians {Aletes . . . is derived from Al-Ait, the god of fire}.  He observes moreover, that the Titans were the children of Cronus, and that they were seven in number . . .” — 1:129 & fn.
Seven individual sons of God
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “PITṚIS. . . . the first Pitṛis were the sons of the gods. . . . The account . . . is much the same in all the Purāṇas.  ‘They agree in distinguishing them into seven classes, three of which are without form . . . and four are corporeal.’ ” — pp. 235-6

— 142-3 —

the name of the scriptural Japhet is on the list of the Titans . . .
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “The truth of this supposition is yet further proved by the remarkable circumstance of the scriptural name of Japhet being accurately preserved in the list of the Titans {According to the author of the works ascribed to Orpheus}.” — 1:130 & fn.

— 143 —

the seven “Arkite” Titans . . . were Kœus, Krœus, Phorcys, Kronos . . .
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “. . . the names of the seven arkite Titans were Cèus, Crèus, Phorcys, Cronus, Oceanus, Hyperion, and Iapetus.
Κοιον τε, Κροιον τε μεγαν, Φορκυν τε κραταιον,
Και Κρονον, Ωκεανον ϑ’, Ὑπεριονα τ’, Ιαπετον τε.
            Orph. apud. Proc. in Tim. lib. v. p. 295.” — 1:130 fn.
The Kabiri . . . are also called Manes and their mother Mania . . .
see: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Another title, by which the Cabiri were known, was that of the Manes; while their mother was supposed to have been called Mania. . . . says Arnobius {Arnob. adv. Gent. lib. iii. p. 124} . . .” — 1:134, 135 fn.
Mania is the female Manu.  (See Ramayana.)
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In the Rāmāyaṇa mention is made of a female Manu, and it appears that the word is sometimes used for ‘the wife of Manu.’ ” — p. 201
see: Monier Williams, Sanskrit-English Dictionary, 1872: “Manāyī, f. [female] (fr. manu), Manu’s wife.” — p. 742
Ila . . . the wife . . . of Vaivasvata Manu, from whom “he begat the race . . .”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “IḌĀ. . . . A legend in the Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa represents her as springing from a sacrifice which Manu performed for the purpose of obtaining offspring. . . . he begat upon her the race of Manu.” — pp. 122-3
she is the Earth (Sayana making her the goddess of the Earth)
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “IḌĀ. . . . According to Sāyaṇa, she is the goddess presiding over the earth.” — p. 122
Both Ida and Vâch are turned into males and females . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “. . . Iḍā . . . her sex was changed; and she became a man, Su-dyumna.  Under the malediction of Śiva, Su-dyumna was again turned into a woman, and, as Ilā, married Budha or Mercury.” — p. 123
Vâch, “the female Virâj” . . . to punish the Gandarvas
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The Aitareya Brāhmaṇa and the Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa have a story of the Gandharvas having stolen the soma juice . . . Vāch was, at her own suggestion, ‘turned into a female’ by the gods and Ṛishis, and went to recover it from them.” — p. 330
Titea . . . whom Diodorus makes the mother of the Titans . . . was the wife of Noah . . .
see: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “. . . the assertion of Diodorus, that the Titans were the children of Titèa {Bibl. lib. iii. p. 190}, whom Pseudo-Berosus represents as being the wife of Noah {Beros. Ant. lib. i. Fol. 8}.” — 2:241 & fn., 242 fn.
the “pseudo-Berosus
see: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Pseudo-Berosus . . . the writings of this Berosus, which I shall frequently have occasion to cite, were published by Annius of Viterbo [Giovanni Nanni], and are certainly not those of the real Berosus.  We are informed by Pliny, (Nat. Hist. lib. vi. cap. 55.) that the genuine history of Berosus contained the events of 480 years; but of that work there now only remain a few fragments, cited by Josephus in his Writings against Apion, and by Alexander Polyhistor in the Chronographia of Syncellus.” — 1:79 fn.
“Titea magna” was afterwards called Aretia . . .
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “. . . Titea magna . . . Berosus asserts, that she was afterwards called Aretia, and worshipped in conjunction with the earth.” — 2:242 fn.

— Footnotes [143-4]

Aretia is the female form of Artes (Egyptian Mars) . . .
see: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Aretia is evidently the Hebrew ארץ Aretz, the earth.” — 2:242 fn.
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “. . . the word ארץ, arets, earth, is really a very great god-word, expressive . . . of the first great abstract hermaphrodite source of production, or generation . . . under the titles Arts, Artes . . . for Mars . . .” — p. 66
The author of “Beiträge zur Kenntniss” . . . quotes: “Addit Cedrenus . . .”
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “As to this, Seyffarth (Beitraege zur kenntniss), under ‘Artes,’ Mars, quoting, says: ‘Addit Cedrenus (Salm. 1, C.): Stella Martis ab Ægyptiis vocatur Ertosi (plantare, generare).  Significat autem hoc omnis generis procreationem et vivificationem, omnisque substantiæ et materiæ naturam et vim ordinantem atque procreantem’ [Cedrenus says (Salmasius I.c): The planet Mars was called by the Egyptians Ertosi (to plant, to generate).  This implies the creating and generating of everything, the creating and determining of the nature and powers of all substance and matter].” — pp. 185-6
Arts is the same in Hebrew and Egyptian . . . the primeval idea of Earth as source . . .
p/q: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “Thus, the words, are the same for ARTS, Hebrew, and ARTS, Egyptian, and combine the primal idea of earth as source; precisely as in the Hebrew itself, under another form, Adam, and Mādim, Mars, are the same, and combine the idea of earth, with Adam, under the form of h-adam-h.” — p. 186

— 144 —

“Titea,” Noah’s consort . . . Rhea, the mother of the Titans
see: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Titèa . . .is mentioned by the Pseudo-Berosus, as the wife of Noah . . . Cronus then is said by Sanchoniatho to have had three sons . . . in allusion to the triple offspring of Noah . . . he is also described . . . as being the father of seven sons by Rhea . . .” — 1:79-80
“Titea-Aretia” was worshipped as Horchia . . . a title of Vesta
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Berosus afterwards mentions, that Titea-Aretia was worshipped under the name of Horchia, which . . . was likewise a title of Vesta.” — 2:242 fn.
Sicanus deificavit Aretiam . . .”
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Sicanus deificavit Aretiam, et nominavit eam lingua Janigena Horchiam [Sicanus deified Aretia and named her Horchia of the lineage of Jannus].  Ibid. lib. v. fol. 64.” — 2:242 fn.
Hence the destruction . . . of the Phlegyæ.  (See Pausanius and Nonus . . .)
see: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “Nonnus somewhat varies from Pausanias in his account of the destruction of the Phlegyæ; but the variation is of such a nature as to give additional probability . . . that they were the same as the Phlegrèan giants and the antediluvian Titans.” — 2:281
“From its deep-rooted base the Phlegyan isle . . .”
p/q: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803:
“ ‘From its deep-rooted base the Phlegyan isle
Stern Neptune shook, and plunged beneath the waves
Its impious inhabitants.’ ” — 2:281 (Nonnus, Dionysiaca, lib. xviii. p. 319)
Faber felt convinced that the “insulæ Phlegyæ” were Atlantis.
see: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “I am persuaded, that the tradition of the sinking of the Phlegyan isle is the very same as that of the sinking of the island Atlantis.” — 2:283
“the Deluge has more than one meaning. . . . (See “Isis Unveiled” . . . )
see: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “curious interpretation of noah,” 2:423-4.
“the Deluge . . . refers . . . to pre-cosmic transformations . . .”
see: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The reader will remember . . . the ‘day’ and ‘night’ of Brahma.  The former represents a certain period of cosmical activity, the latter an equal one of cosmical repose. . . . in the latter the ‘inbreathing’ of Brahma reverses the tendency of the natural forces; everything visible becomes gradually dispersed; chaos comes; and a long night of [pre-cosmical] repose . . .” — 2:421
to the great flood of waters (matter) in chaos . . . fructified by those Spirit-Rays
see: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘. . . and the ark went (with Noah — the spirit) upon the face of the waters.’  Thus Noah . . . is the spirit vivifying matter, chaos represented by the deep or waters of the flood.” — 2:423-4
Anu, Bel, and Noah preceded Adam Kadmon
see: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “. . . the Chaldeo-Babylonian triad placed under Ilon, the unrevealed deity, is composed of Anu, Nuah, and Bel.  Anu is the primoridal chaos . . . the uncreated matter issued from the one and fundamental principle of all things.  As to Nuah, he is . . . ‘the intelligence . . . which animates and fecundates matter, which penetrates the universe, directs and makes it live . . . the Spirit moving on the waters.’ ” — 2:423
the time assigned by Messrs. Croll and Stockwell for the first glacial period . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “. . . epochs of glaciation . . . according to Stockwell’s calculations (supplemented by Croll’s) . . . Those at 210,000 and 850,000 years are the most striking.” — p. 368

— 144-5 —

attributed by geologists . . . to “an extreme eccentricity of the Earth’s orbit”
p/q: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “. . . the theory that epochs of glaciation on the northern hemisphere have been caused by extreme eccentricity of the earth’s orbit.” — p. 368

— 145 —

the shifting of the Earth’s axis . . . found in the Book of Enoch
see: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883: “In those days Noah saw that the earth became inclined . . . After this there was a great perturbation on earth . . . A commandment has gone forth . . . against those who dwell on the earth, that they may be destroyed; for they know every secret of the angels, every oppressive and secret power of the devils, and every power of those who commit sorcery . . .” — p. 78 (lxiv.1, 4, 6)
“the great inclination of the Earth,” which “is in travail”
p/q: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883: “Thus the Lord commanded . . . those who dwell on earth, saying, Open your eyes . . . The word of his mouth shall destroy all sinners . . . Trouble shall come upon them, as upon a woman in travail . . .” — p. 73-4 (lxi.1, 4, 7)
      “In those days Noah saw that the earth became inclined . . . And Noah cried . . . the earth labours, and is violently shaken . . . After this there was a great perturbation on earth . . .” — p. 78 (lxiv.1, 3-4)
Is not this evident?  Nuah is Noah, floating on the waters . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Is not this evident?  Nuah is Noah, floating on the waters, in his ark; the latter being the emblem of the argha, or moon, the feminine principle; Noah is the ‘spirit’ falling into matter.  We find him as soon as he descends upon the earth, planting a vineyard, drinking of the wine, and getting drunk on it; i.e., the pure spirit becoming intoxicated as soon as it is finally imprisoned in matter.” — 2:423
The seventh chapter of Genesis is only another version of the First. . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The seventh chapter of Genesis is but another version of the first.  Thus, while the latter reads: ‘. . . and darkness was upon the face of the deep.  And the spirit (of God) moved upon the face of the waters’ [Gen. 1:2], in chapter seventh [Gen. 7:18], it is said: ‘. . . and the waters prevailed . . . and the ark went (with Noah — the spirit) upon the face of the waters.’ ” — 2:423
Thus Noah . . . the Chaldean Nuah, is the spirit vivifying matter . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Thus Noah, if the Chaldean Nuah, is the spirit vivifying matter, chaos represented by the deep waters of the flood.  In the Babylonian legend it is Istar (Astoreth, the moon) which is shut up in the ark, and sends out a dove (emblem of Venus and other lunar goddesses) in search of dry land.” — 2:423-4
first the creation of the moon, and then that of the sun: “Its beauty and perfection . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “George Smith notes in the tablets, first the creation of the moon, and then of the sun: ‘Its beauty and perfection are extolled . . .’ ” — 2:423 fn.
p/q: George Smith, The Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “After the moon the creation of the sun is recorded, its beauty and perfection are extolled, and the regularity of its orbit, which led to its being considered the type of a judge, and the regulator of the world.” — p. 75
If this story related simply to a cosmogonical cataclysm . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Did this story of the deluge relate simply to a cosmogonical cataclysm — even were it universal — why should the goddess Ishtara or Astoreth (the moon) speak of the creation of the sun after the deluge?  The waters might have reached as high as the mountains of Nizir (Chaldean version), or Jebel-Djudi (the deluge-mountains of the Arabian legends), or yet Ararat (of the biblical narrative), and even Himalaya of the Hindu tradition, and yet not reach the sun — even the Bible itself stopped short of such a miracle.” — 2:423 fn.
It is evident that the deluge of the people who first recorded it . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “It is evident that the deluge of the people who first recorded it had another meaning, less problematical and far more philosophical than that of a universal deluge, of which there are no geological traces whatever.” — 2:423 fn.
such Cataclysms are periodical and cyclical . . . (vide infra . . .)
see: “The Primeval Manus of Humanity”: “ ‘. . . our Vaivasvata was but one of the seven Minor Manus, who are made to preside over the seven races of this our planet.  Each of these has to become the witness of one of the periodical and ever-recurring cataclysms (by fire and water) that close the cycle of every Root-race.’ ” — SD 2:309

— 146 —

“the accursed race of giants,” the Cainites
see: The Book of Adam and Eve, tr. S. C. Malan, 1882: “. . . the children of Seth went astray and fell . . .”  “For all the rest went down from the mountain and fell into sin with the children of Cain.” — pp. 140, 141 (ii.22)
      “. . . the children of Seth gathered together . . . And when they were come down and saw the daughters of Cain the accursed, those sons of Seth committed adultery with them . . . Of these adulteries giants were born.” — p. 230 (Bk ii, Note 26)
“the accursed race . . .” . . . “the sons of Ham”
see: George Stanley Faber, The Origin of Pagan Idolatry, 1816: “An opinion has . . . very generally prevailed, that a curse was pronounced upon Ham, which devoted his posterity to servitude: hence the epithet accursed has been liberally bestowed upon that patriarch . . .”  “Hence, because the Arabic version reads cursed be the father of Canaan, and because some copies of the lxx substitute Ham in the place of Canaan; they would, throughout the prophecy, wherever the word Canaan occurs, correct it to [cursed be] Ham the father of Canaan.” — 1:89, 90
“there is no god or mortal . . .” when Manu Vaivasvata lands on the Himavan
see: Monier Williams, Indian Epic Poetry, 1863:
“ ‘Unwearied thus for years on years that fish propelled the ship . . .
               . . . till at length it bore the vessel to the peak
Of Himavān; then softly smiling thus the fish addressed the sage . . .
From Manu all creation, gods, asuras, men, must be produced;
By him the world must be created, that which moves and moveth not.’ ”
              — p. 36 (Mahābhārata, “Vana-parva”)
“the Flood had swept away all living creatures, and he alone was left”
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The first account of this [Deluge] is found in the Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa . . . The flood rose, and Manu fastened the cable of the ship to the fish’s horn. . . . with the subsiding waters . . . [Manu] found that the flood had swept away all living creatures.  He alone was left.” — pp. 199-200

— Footnotes

“In every Dvapara (third) age, Vishnu, in the person of Vyasa . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “In every Dwāpara (or third) age, Vishṇu, in the person of Vyāsa . . . divides the Veda, which is . . . one, into many portions. . . . he makes the Veda fourfold . . .” — 3:33 (iii.3)
“Twenty-eight times have the Vedas been arranged . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Twenty-eight times have the Vedas been arranged, by the great Ṛishis, in the Vaivaswata Manwantara in the Dwāpara age; and, consequently, eight and twenty Vyāsas have passed away; by whom, in their respective periods, the Veda has been divided into four.” — 3:34 (iii.3)
they who were all in the form of Veda-Vyasas . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “In the first Dwāpara age, the distribution was made by Swayaṃbhū (Brahmā) himself; in the second, the arranger of the Veda (Veda-vyāsa) was Prajāpati (or Manu); in the third, Uśanas . . .” — 3:34 (iii.3)
“This world is Brahmâ in Brahmâ, from Brahmâ . . . nothing further to be known.”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “I have learned . . . how this world is Vishṇu . . . in Vishṇu . . . from Vishṇu: nothing further is to be known.” — 3:33 (iii.3)
“There were in the First Manvantara seven celebrated sons of Vasishta . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘There were (in the first Manwantara) seven celebrated sons of Vasishṭha, who (in the third Manwantara) were sons of Brahmā (i.e. Ṛishis), the illustrious posterity of Ūrjā.’ ” — 3:6-7 fn.

— 147 —

“of that island (Plato speaking only of its last island) . . .”
see: Charles Anthon, A Classical Dictionary, 1841: “Atlantis, a celebrated island, supposed to have existed at a very early period in the Atlantic Ocean, and to have been eventually sunk beneath its waves.  Plato is the first that gives an account of it . . . (Plat., Timæus . . . Critias . . .).” — p. 227
“of that island . . . beyond the Pillars of Hercules . . .”
p/q: Sampson Arnold Mackey, Mythological Astronomy, 1822-3: “ ‘This island . . . was situated beyond the Pillars of Hercules . . . in the Atlantic Ocean: from which there was an easy transition to other islands in the neighbourhood of another large continent.’ ” — p. 67 (Key of Urania)
It is this “Atlantic” land which was connected with the “White Island
see: Sampson Arnold Mackey, Mythological Astronomy, 1822-3: “. . . the Hindu books speak of it . . . by the epithet of Atala, Atlantis, the White Island . . .” — pp. 67-8 (Key of Urania)
the “White Devil” of Colonel Wilford
see: Sampson Arnold Mackey, Mythological Astronomy, 1822-3: “. . . in vol. 8, p. 280 [Asiatic Researches], it is called the White Devil or demon of terror.” — p. 68 (Key of Urania)
see: Francis Wilford, “The Sacred Isles in the West,” 1808: “The Sacred Isles in the West, of which Śweta-dwīpa, or the White Island, is the principal, and the most famous, are, in fact, the holy land of the Hindus.”  “. . . we see Caicaus going to the mountain of Az-burj . . . to fight the Div-sefid, or white devil, the Tāra-daitya of the Purāṇas, and whose abode was on the seventh stage of the world . . . in other words, to the White Island.” — pp. 246, 280 (Asiatic Researches, v. 8)
the Dvapara Yuga lasts 864,000 years
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Twelve thousand divine years, each composed of (three hundred and sixty) such days, constitute the period of the four Yugas or ages.  They are thus distributed: the Kṛita age has four thousand divine years; the Tretā, three thousand; the Dwāpara, two thousand . . .
{Dwāpara Yuga    
   2000
  Sandhyā
200
  Sandhyāṃśa
  200
 
2400
2400 x 360 = 864.000}.” — 1:49, 50 fn. (i.3)
“a woman was produced who . . . declared herself his daughter . . .”
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “A women was produced, who came to Manu and declared herself his daughter.  ‘With her he lived, worshipping and toiling in arduous religious rites, desirous of offspring.  With her he begat . . . the offspring of Manu.’ ” — p. 200 (Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa, i. 8, 1, 1)
to divide his body into two halves . . . Brahmâ and Vâch
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ ‘Having divided his body into two parts, the lord (Brahmā) became with the half a male, and with the (other) half a female; and in her he created Virāj.’ ” — p. 359
      “Vāch . . . is identified with Virāj . . . ‘That daughter of thine, O Kāma . . . she whom sages denominate Vāch-Virāj.’ ” — p. 330 (Atharva-veda, ix. 2, 5)
“the flesh of his . . . flesh and the bone of his . . . bone”
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . the rib, which the Lord God had taken from man, made he a woman, and brought her unto the man.  And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh.” — p. 3 (Genesis, 2:22-3)
“contradictions and amazing nonsense,” as some call the Purânas . . .
see: F. Max Müller, India: What Can It Teach Us?, 1883: “These Manus are intimately connected with the theory of the Yugas and Kalpas. . . . the tradition about the Fathers and the Ṛishis and the Manus and Prajāpatis goes on growing, different conceptions being mixed up together . . . till in the Purāṇas the confusion exceeds all bounds, and the original germs of sense are smothered beneath a thick layer of mere nonsense.” — p. 373

— 147-8 —

Manu . . . desiring to create sons, instituted a sacrifice to Mitra and Varuna . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Manu, being desirous of sons, offered a sacrifice . . . to Mitra and Varuṇa; but . . . through an irregularity of the ministering priest, a daughter, Ilā was produced.  Through the favour of the two divinities, however, (her sex was changed, and) she became a man, named Sudyumna.” — 3:233-4 (iv.1)

— 148 —

“she would be male one month and female another”
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “. . . Śiva and his consort conceded that . . . [Ilā] should be a male one month and a female another.” — p. 123
“Ila was primarily food . . . personified as the goddess of speech.”
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “In the Ṛig-veda Iḍā is primarily food . . . or a libation of milk; thence a stream of praise, personified as the goddess of speech.”  “In the Purāṇas she is . . . Iḍā or Ilā.” — pp. 122, 123
the union of Swâyambhûba Manu with Vâch-Sata-Rupa . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The first of these Manus was Swāyam-bhuva . . . Brahmā created himself Manu, ‘born of and identical with his original self, and the female portion of himself he constituted Śata-rūpā,’ whom Manu took to wife.” — p. 199
Manu with . . . his own daughter (this being the first “euhemerization” . . .)
see: F. Max Müller, Lectures on the Science of Language, 1873: “. . . Euhemerism has become the recognised title of that system of mythological interpretation which . . . reduces the gods of old to the level of men.” — 2:434
“From Manu all creation, gods, Asuras, man must be produced . . .”
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The story, as told in the Mahā-bhārata . . . according to the rendering of Professor [Monier] Williams . . .
‘From Manu all creation, gods, Asuras, men, must be produced;
By him the world must be created, that which moves and moveth not.’ ” — pp. 200-1

— 149 —

d’Assier, the Positivist, seems to have proven the fact pretty plainly
see: Adolphe d’Assier, Posthumous Humanity, tr. H. S. Olcott, 1887: “The proofs which I possessed seemed to me strong enough to convince unprejudiced minds. . . . It remained to interpret these facts, that is, to strip them of everything like the marvellous, so as to connect them, like all other natural phenomena, with the laws of time and space.  Such is the chief aim of this book.” — p. xiii
The ridiculous claim usually brought forward by theologians . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “. . . the habitability of other worlds has been denied on theological grounds.  It was formerly a common theological belief that the biblical teaching is incompatible with the doctrine of other worlds of beings.  Dr. Whewell disputed the plurality of worlds by appeal to scientific evidence {Whewell: Of the Plurality of Worlds}.” — p. 497 & fn.

— Footnotes [149-50]

“The heat evolved by contraction would last only 18,000,000 years” . . .
p/q: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “Professor Newcomb says the heat evolved by contraction from an infinite distance would last only 18,000,000 years {Newcomb: Popular Astronomy, 509}.  A temperature permitting the existence of water on the earth would have been reached 10,000,000 years ago.” — p. 356 & fn.
But Sir W. Thomson says that the whole age of incrustation . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “The time required for the earth to cool from incipient incrustation to its present state, based on the thermal conductivity of rock-masses and the rate of increase of heat toward the earth’s centre.  Sir William Thomson concludes that this time cannot exceed 80,000,000 years.” — p. 356
The Plurality of Worlds” (1853) — an anonymous work . . . is a good proof of this
see: Of the Plurality of Worlds: An Essay [by William Whewell], 1853: “. . . Revealed Religion contains no doctrine relative to the inhabitants of planets and stars . . . no Christian thinker deemed such a doctrine to be required . . .” — p. iii
      “. . . my philosophical basis is only the earth, the only known habitation.” — p. 32 (“Dialogue”)
No Christian ought to believe in . . . the plurality of worlds . . .
p/q: Camille Flammarion, La Pluralité des Mondes Habités, 1869: “. . . Whewell a pour but de montrer aux chrétiens qu’ils ne doivent ni ne peuvent admettre notre doctrine, et pour cela il cherche à leur faire croire que le Pluralité des Mondes n’est qu’un mythe [Whewell intends to show Christians that they ought not and cannot accept our doctrine, and therefore he seeks to make them believe that the plurality of worlds is but a myth].” — p. 340
if it is asserted that this world is only one among the many of its kind . . .
p/q: Camille Flammarion, La Pluralité des Mondes Habités, 1869: “. . . si l’on nous dit que ce monde n’est qu’un individu parmi des Mondes innombrables qui seraient tous comme lui l’ouvrage de Dieu; tous comme lui le siége de la vie; tous le séjour de créatures intelligentes, douées de volonté, soumises à une loi, capables d’obéissance et de désobéissance, comme nous; il devient dès lors extravagant et inadmissible de penser que notre Monde ait été le théâtre de la complaisance et de la bonté de Dieu, et, qui plus est, l’objet de son interposition spéciale, de ses communications et de sa visite personnelle [if we are told that this world is but one among innumerable worlds which, like it, would all be the work of God; all like it the seat of life; all the abode of intelligent creatures, endowed with will, subject to one law, capable of obedience and disobedience, like us; then, it would be extravagant and inadmissable to think that our world has been the stage of the pleasure and goodness of God, and what is more, the object of his special interference, his communications and his personal visit].” — p. 341
Can the earth presume to be considered the centre . . .
p/q: Camille Flammarion, La Pluralité des Mondes Habités, 1869: “La Terre pourrait-elle être le centre de l’univers moral et religieux lorsqu’elle n’a pas la moindre distinction dans l’univers physique?  N’est-il pas aussi absurde de soutenir une pareille assertion qu’il le serait aujourd’hui de soutenir la vieille hypothèse de Ptolémée qui plaçait la Terre au centre des mouvements célestes [Could the earth be the center of the moral and religious universe, when it has no distinctive features in the physical universe?  And is it not absurd to maintain a similar assertion as it would be nowadays to maintain the old hypothesis of Ptolemy, who saw the Earth as the center of the heavenly motions]?” — p. 341

— 150 —

the Monads . . . had passed their phases of immetalization
see: The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett, 1926: “. . . passing through all the preliminary evolutions and combinations of the first three kingdoms . . . [the monad] finds itself encased in its first mineral form . . . Having passed through its seven great classes of inmetalliation . . . the monad gives birth to the vegetable kingdom . . .” — p. 79 (Letter XIV, received July 9, 1882)
Bahak-Zivo . . . fails to construct “a human soul in the creature”
see: S. F. Dunlap, Sōd, The Son of the Man, 1861: “BAHAK ZIVO . . . said with a loud voice . . . This is the command, that I construct creatures: but which will not be in my power. . . . [not] having knowledge of consuming fire which is wanting in light, I shall not have this in my power.” — p. 50 (Codex Nazaraeus, I.181)

— 150-1 —

should spontaneous generation be indeed proven impossible . . .
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Evolution of Man, 1886: “. . . even if in our own time Monera were produced daily by spontaneous generation . . . the absolute empiric proof of this fact would be extremely difficult — indeed, in most cases impossible.” — 2:32

— 151 —

The question . . . “when, at what period, life appeared on Earth?”
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Evolution of Man, 1886: “Here arises another question: ‘Whence, in the beginning of the organic history of the earth, at the commencement of the Laurentian period, came the earliest Amœbæ?’ ” — 2:30
that Hæckel’s Moneron . . . has solved the problem of the origin of life . . . is simply absurd
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Evolution of Man, 1886: “He, however, who does not assume a spontaneous generation of Monera . . . to explain the first origin of life upon our earth, has no other resource but to believe in a supernatural miracle . . .” — 2:32
the primitive speck of protoplasm (moneron) is neither animal nor plant
see: Ernst Haeckel, “Monograph of Monera,” 1869: “. . . the whole body consists of a homogeneous plasma, or protoplasma . . . The Monera . . . can be classed with equal propriety . . . primitive animals or as primitive plants. . . . They are neither animals nor plants.” — p. 29 (Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, v. 9)
it has no ancestors . . . the Monera are their own ancestors
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “First Division of the Chain of Ancestors of the Human Race. . . . First stage. — Monera.  Organisms of the simplest structure conceivable . . . The earliest Monera, from which later on the first cells evolved, can only have arisen by evolution from inorganic matter.” — pp. 75-6
reproduced . . . by gemmation: as do microscopical animals
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Evolution of Man, 1886: “In many other Primitive Animals (Protozoa), the simple reproduction is accomplished, not by division, but by the formation of buds (gemmation).” — 2:390

— 152 —

“Evolution . . . has only been studied for some twenty-five years . . .”
p/q: A. Wilson, “The Evolution of Man,” Dec. 23, 1881: “. . . evolution has only been studied — rather nature, in the light of evolution, has only been studied — for some twenty five years or so.  That is, of course, a mere fractional space in the history of human thought.” — p. 157 (Knowledge, v. 1)
“Each . . . answer to the great Question . . .”
p/q: Thomas H. Huxley, Evidence as to Man’s Place in Nature, 1863: “Each such answer to the great question, invariably asserted by the followers of its propounders, if not by himself, to be complete and final, remains in high authority and esteem, it may be for one century, or it may be for twenty: but, as invariably, Time proves each reply to have been a mere approximation to the truth — tolerable chiefly on account of the ignorance of those by whom it was accepted, and wholly intolerable when tested by the larger knowledge of their successors.” — p. 72 (“On the Relations of Man to the Lower Animals”)
“ ‘Has evolution effected any change in man? . . .’ ”
p/q: A. Wilson, “The Evolution of Man,” Dec. 23, 1881: “ ‘G.M.’ asks, ‘has evolution effected any change in man?  If so, what change?  If not, why not?’ . . . If we refuse to admit (as science does) that man was created a perfect being, and then became degraded, there exists only another supposition — that of evolution.  If man has arisen from a savage to a civilised state, that surely is evolution.  We do not yet know, because such knowledge is difficult to acquire, if the human frame is subject to the same influences as those of lower animals.” — p. 157 (Knowledge, v. 1)
“But there is little doubt that elevation from savagery to civilized life . . .”
p/q: A. Wilson, “The Evolution of Man,” Dec. 23, 1881: “But there is little doubt that elevation from savagery to civilised life means and implies ‘evolution,’ and that of considerable extent.  Mentally, man’s evolution cannot be doubted; the ever-widening sphere of thought has sprung from small and rude beginnings, like language itself.  But man’s ways of life, his power of adaptation to his surroundings, and countless other circumstances, have made the facts and course of his ‘evolution’ very difficult to trace.” — p. 157 (Knowledge, v. 1)

— 153 —

Darwin’s evolution begins at the middle point . . .
see: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The ancient sages . . . made their starting-point from the first manifestation of the unseen . . . Evolution began with them from pure spirit, which descending lower and lower down, assumed at last a visible and comprehensible form, and became matter.” — 1:xxx-xxxi
      “Darwin begins his evolution . . . at the wrong end.” — 1:429
The Artistotle-Baconian method . . . demonstrated its defects
see: John William Draper, History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science, 1875: “The essential principle of the Artistotelian philosophy was, to rise from the study of particulars to a knowledge of general principles or universals . . . The failures that Aristotle himself so often exhibits . . . are failures arising from want of a sufficiency of facts.” — p. 22
Plato, who proceeded from the Universals downward . . .
see: John William Draper, History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science, 1875: “The philosophical method of Plato was the inverse of that of Aristotle.  Its starting-point was universals . . . and from these it descended to particulars . . .” — p. 26
“Almost all those . . . who affirm that they have studied heaven . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘Almost all those, who affirm that they have studied heaven in its uniformity, claim that the earth is in the centre, but the philosophers of the Italian School, otherwise called the Pythagoreans, teach entirely the contrary.  In their opinion, the centre is occupied by the fire, and the earth is only a star, which by a circular movement around this same centre, produces day and night {De Cælo, Bk. ii, c. 13}.’ ” — pp. 139-40 & fn.

— Footnotes

This substance received its name of “Sarcode” from Prof. Dujardin . . .
see: H. C. Bastian, The Beginnings of Life, 1872: “It will be useful for us to see . . . what Prof. Haeckel has to say concerning the members of his group Monera {Professor Haeckel proposes that the word ‘Sarcode,’ introduced by Dujardin, should be applied to the free protoplasm which exists without a covering or limiting membrane} . . .” — 1:117, 118 fn.
The Monera are indeed Protista.  They are neither animals “nor plants” . . .
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, “Monograph of Monera,” 1869: “. . . the whole body of the Monera . . . represents nothing more than a single, thoroughly homogeneous particle of albumen, in a firmly adhesive condition. . . . The Monera are indeed Protista.  They are neither animals nor plants.  They are organisms of the most primitive kind: among which the distinction between animals and plants does not yet exist.” — pp. 28-9 (Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, v. 9)

— 154 —

“There were giants on earth in those days”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that . . .” — p. 7 (Genesis, 6:4)
the Hæckelian Moneron is, strictly “an organism without organs” . . .
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Evolution of Man, 1886: “. . . we yet find that all the parts are completely homogeneous.  These Monera are, therefore, in the strictest sense of the word, ‘organisms without organs’ . . .” — 2:45
the cooling of our Earth from a temperature of 2,000° to 200° Cent. . . .
see: Alexander Winchell, World-Life, or Comparative Geology, 1883: “Helmholtz calculates that twenty million years would suffice for the orignal nebula to condense to the present dimensions of our sun. . . . But meantime Bischof calculates that 350 million years would be required for the earth to cool from a temperature of 2,000° to 200° centigrade.” — pp. 179-80
Thomson . . . limits the appearance of the earliest vegetable life to 100,000,000 years ago
see: John Fiske, “Europe Before the Arrival of Man,” April 1882: “. . . Sir William Thomson concludes that the crust of the earth . . . has not been solidified and in fit condition for the support of vegetable and animal life for more than 100,000,000 or 200,000,000 years.” — p. 436 (Atlantic Monthly, v. 49)
“Volger . . . calculates that the time requisite for the deposit of the strata . . .”
p/q: Louis Büchner, Force and Matter, ed. J. F. Collingwood, 1864: “Volger finally calculates, that the time requisite for the deposit of the strata known to us must at least have amounted to 648 millions of years!  From these numbers, we may form some notion as to the extent of these periods of time. . . . The enormous distances in the universe . . . in combination with these almost unlimited periods of time, lead us to acknowledge that both time and space are infinite and eternal.” — p. 61
“ ‘The Earth, as a material existence, is indeed infinite . . .’ ”
p/q: Louis Büchner, Force and Matter, ed. J. F. Collingwood, 1864: “ ‘The earth as a material existence is, indeed, infinite; the changes only which it has undergone can be determined by finite periods of time.’ (Burmeister)  ‘We must therefore assume, that the starry heaven is not merely in space, what no astronomer doubts, but also in time without beginning or end; that it never was created, and is imperishable.’ (Czolbe).” — p. 61
“They were even ignorant of the globular form of our earth.”
see: Élisée Reclus, The Earth, 1873: “The globe of our earth is in evident conformity to all the laws of harmony . . . So long as the greater part of the surface of the globe was unknown to geographers, and they were ignorant of the true form of the earth . . . It was impossible for them to take into account the laws which had influenced the distribution of the continents . . . except by making unproved assertions, or by speculations in miraculous cosmogonies.” — p. 46

— 155 —

“The Sun is stationed, for all time, in the middle of the day . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Whilst the sun . . . shines, in one continent, in midday, in the opposite Dwīpas . . . it will be midnight. . . . There is, in truth, neither rising nor setting of the sun; for he is always {‘The sun is stationed, for all time, in the middle of the day, and over against midnight in all the dwipas, Maitreya.  But, the rising and the setting of the sun being perpetually opposite to each other, — and, in the same way, all the cardinal points, and so the cross-points, — Maitreya’} . . .” — 2:241 & fn. (ii.8)
“people speak of the rising of the Sun where they see it . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘. . . people speak of the rising of the sun where they see it; and, where the sun disappears, there, to them, is his setting.  Of the sun, which is always in one and the same place, there is neither setting nor rising; for what are called rising and setting are only the seeing and the not seeing the sun.’ ” — 2:241-2 fn. (ii.8)
“The Heliocentrism taught in this passage is remarkable . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The heliocentrism taught in this passage . . . is remarkable.  It is contradicted, however, a little further on.” — 2:242 fn.
Martin Haug remarked the same teaching in another passage.
see: Aitareya Brahmanam of the Rigveda, tr. Martin Haug, 1863: “I here mean the well known passage in the Jyotisham, or Vedic calendar, about the position of the solstitial points.”  “That an astronomical observation was taken by the Brahmans as early as the 12th century before Christ is proved beyond any doubt . . .”  “Now that observation proves . . . the Indians had made already such a considerable progress in astronomical science . . . as to enable them to take such observations . . .” — 1:42, 45, 47 (Introduction)
“of man, the highest organic being of creation, not a trace was found . . .”
p/q: Louis Büchner, Force and Matter, 1864: “Of man, the highest organic being of creation, not a trace was found in the primary strata; only in the uppermost, the so-called alluvial layer, in which human life could exist, he appears on the stage . . .” — p. 65
That man can be shown to have lived in the mid-Tertiary . . .
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “. . . l’Abbé Bourgeois . . . has discovered . . . in the Commune of Thénay, flints, the shape of which he thinks can only be attributed to man.  Now geologists are unanimous in considering these deposits as miocene, belonging to the mean tertiary age.” — p. 151
“the time represented by the coal formation would be six millions of years”
p/q: Samuel Laing, Modern Science and Modern Thought, 1888: “. . . Professor Huxley calculates that the time represented by the Coal formation alone would be six millions of years.” — p. 32

— 156 —

up to the Miocene, when the bulk of the Fourth Race was submerged
see: A. P. Sinnett, Esoteric Buddhism, 1885: “I had asked to what epoch Atlantis belonged, and whether the cataclysm by which it was destroyed came at an appointed place in the progress of evolution . . . The answer was: ‘To the Miocene times.’ ” — p. 70
Charcot and Richet have vindicated Mesmer’s claims
see: H. S. Drayton, Human Magnetism, 1889: “After the report of the Government commission was made known . . . Mesmer himself was denounced as an imposter . . .”  “Liebault . . . sought to prove that all the phenomena of the induced or artificial sleep could be produced by suggestion.”  “The facts of hypnotism are numerous enough for the consideration of the scientist . . . Richet . . . [and] Liebault, the disciples of Charcot and others furnish us with a great assemblage of data bearing on suggestion . . .” — pp. 13, 21, 83
the Stanza which says: — “The mind-born, the boneless, gave being to the will-born . . .”
see: Stanza VII: “How did the Manasa [the mind-born], the sons of wisdom act?”  “When the Sweat-born produced the Egg-born, the Two-fold (androgyne Third Race), the Mighty, the Powerful with Bones . . . the Third (race) became the vahan (vehicle) of the Lords of Wisdom.  It created Sons of ‘Will and Yoga’ . . .” — SD 2:171, 172

— Footnotes

The Hylo-idealists of to-day are rank Annihilationists.
see: Robert Lewins, “Hylo-Phenomenalism the Summa Scientiæ,” 1883: “. . . the Hylozoic theorem of life and the world may be formulated as the utter and self-evident impossibility . . . to transcend or escape in any way from the limits of our own anatomy, of our own conscious Ego . . . that all ‘things’ . . . from Divinity downwards, are merely ideal or phenomenal imagery of our own mind . . .” — p. 35 (Appendix I, What is Religion? by C.N.)

— 157 —

de Quatrefages in support of . . . man in that remote antiquity
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “Thus, man . . . has, in all probability, seen miocene times . . . Are there any reasons for believing that his traces will be found further back still? . . . We know that, as far as his body is concerned, man is a mammal . . . He may then have been contemporaneous with the earliest mammalia, and go back as far as the secondary period.” — p. 152
of “Spontaneous generation”; life . . . has not always reigned on this terrestrial plane
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “ ‘How did life, the living world of organisms, arise?’ . . . the spontaneous production of organisms of the simplest conceivable kind.  Such are the Monera . . . it must be regarded as an essential to the beginning of living beings on the earth . . .” — pp. 32-3

— 158 —

the Urschleim of Oken, that organic “slime,” now christened protoplasm
see: Ernst Haeckel, The History of Creation, 1880: “One of the most important of Oken’s theories . . . is the idea that the phenomena of life in all organisms proceed from a common chemical substance . . . which he designated by the name Urschleim, or original slime. . . . Now, we need only change the expression ‘original slime’ (Urschleim) into Protoplasm . . .” — 1:96-7
fallen in meteorites . . . Sir W. Thomson’s wild theory
see: Sir William Thomson, “Inaugural Address of the President of British Association,” Aug. 4, 1871: “. . . we must regard it as probable in the highest degree that there are countless seed-bearing meteoric stones moving about through space . . . The hypothesis that life originated on this earth through moss-grown fragments from the ruins of another world . . . is not unscientific.” — p. 56 (Chemical News, 24:610)
Hylozoism . . . is the highest aspect of Pantheism.
see: H. N. Coleridge, Introductions to the Study of the Greek Classic Poets, 1830: “. . . the doctrine of the Mysteries was a pure Pantheism, Hylozoism {Pantheism — belief in one God identical with, or actually constituting the life of, the material universe; Hylozoism (ὔλης ζωὴ) — life of the subject-matter of the world, and the same with Pantheism} . . .” — p. 226 & fn.

— Footnotes

The conception and definition of the Absolute by Cardinal Cusa
see: W. Windelband, History of Philosophy, 1893: “. . . Nicolaus [of Cusa] was the first to give the method of negative theology its positive expression by treating infinity as the essential characteristic of God . . . The identity of God with the world . . . that in God the same absolute Being is contained infinitely, which in the world presents itself in finite forms. . . . He is, therefore, the absolute reality . . .”— p. 346
“Recent philosophy of the Absolute,” traced by Sir W. Hamilton to Cusa
see: Sir William Hamilton, Philosophy of Sir William Hamilton, 1857: “Cardinal De Cusa. . . . {I make no doubt that his speculations have originated the whole modern philosophy of the Absolute. . . . To Cusa, we can, indeed, articulately trace . . . the recent philosophy of the Absolute}.” — p. 520, 521 fn.

— 159 —

Aristotle remarked that . . . direct creation would be . . . unbecoming to God . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “This, which Cudworth (c. III) calls hylozoism, is not incompatible with an active creator . . . which, as Aristotle says, would be, ἀπρεπές τῶ Θεῶ, unbecoming God . . .”— 1:66 fn.
deity cannot set its own hand to creation . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . ‘not . . . that he [the Creator] should αὐτουργεῖν ἅπαντα, set his own hand . . . to every work’ . . .” — 1:66 fn.
“Nature is a habit moved from itself, according to seminal principles . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the opinion of Zeno, as stated by Laërtius . . . ‘Nature is a habit moved from itself, according to . . . seminal principles; perfecting and containing those several things which in determinate times are produced from it, and acting agreeably to that from which it was secreted.’ Intell. System, I., 328.” — 1:66 fn.
the atmosphere has changed little . . . since the first condensation of the oceans
see: R. Blanchard, “L’Origine de la Vie,” Feb. 7, 1885: “Lors de la condensation des premiers océans, aux époques laurentienne et cambrienne, l’atmosphère, plus dense et plus lourde qu’à présent, devait être formée des mêmes éléments qu’à l’heure actuelle [At the time of the condensation of the first oceans, in the Laurentian and Cambrian ages, the atmosphere, denser and heavier than at present, must have been formed of the same elements that exist today] . . .” — p. 165 (Revue Scientifique, v. 9)
and even of Bischof — as the experiments . . . with basalts have shown
see: R. Blanchard, “L’Origine de la Vie,” Feb. 7, 1885: “Les expériences de Bischoff sur le basalte ont montré que, pour passer de l’état liquide à l’état solide, autrement dit pour se refroidir de 2000° à 200°, notre globe avait eu besoin de 350 millions d’années. . . . Quoi d’étonnant aussi à ce que, dès l’âge cambrien . . . la vie ait été assez différenciée pour produire des plantes telles que les Eophyton . . . [et] animaux tels que . . . les brachiopodes et les premiers trilobites [The experiments of Bischoff with basalt have shown that to pass from the liquid to the solid state, in other words, to cool down from 2000° to 200°, our globe would need 350 million years. . . . Amazing as this may be, since the Cambrian age . . . life was differentiated enough to produce plants like eophytons . . . and animals like . . . brachiopods and the first trilobites]?” — p. 166 (Revue Scientifique, v. 9)

— 159-60 —

there were, in those days, oceans of liquid carbonic acid . . .
see: R. Blanchard, “L’Origine de la Vie,” Feb. 7, 1885: “. . . l’atmosphère tend sans cesse à se débarrasser de son acide carbonique, tandis que, d’autre part, elle s’enrichit sans cesse de nouvelles quantités de ce gaz apportées des profondeurs de la terre. . . . ces phénomènes . . . ont toujours existé, depuis la formation de la première croûte solide et depuis la condensation des premiers océans [the atmosphere tends incessantly to rid itself of its carbonic acid, while on the other hand it enriches itself incessantly with new quantities of this gas brought forth from the depths of the earth. . . . these phenomena . . . have always existed, since the formation of the first solid crust and since the condensation of the first oceans].” — p. 164 (Revue Scientifique, v. 9)

— 160 —

The primitive ancestor, in Brasseur de Bourbourg’s “Popol Vuh” . . .
see:Popol Vuh . . . Par l’Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg” [Review], Oct. 1867: “The third age was that of storm. . . . the earth was swept of all thereon . . . The men took refuge in the forms of apes, and have never left these shapes since.  But one pair, with greater discretion, concealed themselves in a cavern, and of them the next age, that of water, was peopled.  The age of water was so called because it came to an end in an overwhelming deluge.  One pair alone escaped, the name of the man was . . . Huehuetonacateocipatli, i.e. Fish-god-of-our-Flesh, he reminds one of the Indian Avatar, in which Vishnu assumes the fish form, and the Chaldee Oannes or Dag-on.” — p. 441 (Christian Remembrancer, v. 54)
For additional proofs consult . . . “The Septenary in Nature.”
see: “The Mysteries of the Hebdomad,” SD 2:590-641.

— 161 —

(issued from the body of Brahmâ when it became Night)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “chapter v. . . . Origin of different orders of beings from Brahmā’s body under different conditions . . .”  “Brahmā . . . collected his mind into itself.  Whilst thus concentrated, the quality of darkness pervaded his body; and thence the demons (the Asuras) were first born . . . Brahmā then abandoned that form which was composed of the rudiment of darkness, and which, being deserted by him, became night.” — 1:68, 79-80 (i.5)

— 162 —

As Christian Schœttgen says in Horæ Hebraicæ . . .
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “. . . (the terrestrial) Adam . . . had only ‘the breath of life’ {Christian Schœttgen, Horæ Hebraicæ et Talmudicæ in Universum Novum Testamentum, etc. . . . Schœttgen gives this in explanation of I Cor. xv, 45} . . .” — p. 114 & fn.
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . The first man Adam was made a living soul . . . The first man is of the earth, earthy . . .” — p. 234 (1 Corinthians, 15:45, 47)
the first terrestrial Adam “had only the breath of life” . . .
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “. . . the inferior (the terrestrial) Adam, who was lord only of the visible creation, who had only ‘the breath of life’ but not ‘the living soul.’ {Christian Schœttgen, Horæ Hebraicæ . . .}.” — p. 114 & fn.
The Zohar speaks of “Black Fire” . . .
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “. . . when the law was given forth . . . it was written in black fire upon white fire.” — p. 141 (Zohar, “Greater Holy Assembly,” xi.283)
see: Isaac Myer, “Hermes Trismegistus,” Sept. 1886: “ ‘You have, by this means, the light (or fire) of the whole universe.’ . . . the fire referred to here, is not the perceptible fire, but the hidden occult fire, which is concealed in all things . . . So the ancient Hebrew philosophy says, the Tablets of the Law given to Moses, were written by the Deity with black fire on white fire.” — pp. 168-9 (The Path, v. 1)
Lactantius . . . makes the Logos, the Word, the first-born brother of Satan . . .
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “Lactantius (Inst. div. Bk. ii, c. viii) makes the Word, the first-born brother of Satan, and the first of all creatures.” — p. 116
primeval creatures . . . with crooked digestive canals
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā . . . designed another; and . . . the animal creation was manifested, to the products of which the term Tiryaksrotas is applied, from their nutriment following a winding course {Tiryak . . . ‘crooked’, and Srotas . . . ‘a canal’}.” — 1:70-1 & fn. (i.5)
“endowed with inward manifestations, but mutually in ignorance . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “These were called beasts . . . manifesting inward sensations {‘Endowed with inward manifestations, and mutually in ignorance about their kind and nature’} . . .” — 1:71-2 & fn. (i.5)
The twenty-eight kinds of Badha, or imperfections . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . they being destitute of knowledge . . . labouring under the twenty-eight kinds of imperfection {Badhas . . . In place of Badha, however, the more usual reading . . . is Vidha . . . ‘kind’, ‘sort’ . . . implying twenty-eight sorts of animals.  These . . . have single hoofs . . . double, or cloven, hoofs . . . claws, or nails} . . .” — 1:71 & fn. (i.5)
the “five-fold immovable creation,” minerals and vegetables
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . in the beginning of the Kalpas . . . there appeared a creation beginning with ignorance . . . The creation of the creator thus plunged in abstraction was the fivefold (immovable) world . . . {the mineral and vegetable kingdoms}.” — 1:69, 70 fn. (i.5)
then come those fabulous animals, Tiryaksrota
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Since immovable things were first created, this is called the first creation.  Brahmā, beholding that it was defective, designed another; and . . . the animal creation was manifested . . . of which the term Tiryaksrotas is applied . . . These were called beasts . . . they being destitute of knowledge, uncontrolled in their conduct, and mistaking error for wisdom . . .” — 1:70-1 (i.5)
(the monsters of the abyss slain by the “Lords” . . .)
see: Stanza II, 5: “First the abyss of waters and darkness, wherein resided most hideous beings . . . combinations of various animals and men, of fishes, reptiles and other monstrous animals . . .” — SD 2:54
      Stanza V, 18: “. . . turn to the Chaldean Fragments, and read what Berosus says. . . . It was the Moon (Omoroka) who presided over the monstrous creation of nondescript beings which were slain by the Dyanis.” — SD 2:115
the Urdhwasrotas, the happy celestial beings, which feed on ambrosia
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . a third creation appeared, abounding with the quality of goodness, termed Ūrdhwasrotas.  The beings thus produced . . . were endowed with pleasure and enjoyment, unencumbered internally or externally . . . {Ūrdhwa . . . ‘above’ . . . their nourishment being derived from the exterior . . . ‘Through satiety derived from even beholding ambrosia’}.” — 1:72 & fn. (i.5)

— 162-3 —

the Arvaksrotas, human beings — Brahmâ’s seventh creation
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the creation termed Arvāksrotas . . . They abound with the light of knowledge; but the qualities of darkness and of foulness predominate. . . . These creatures were mankind.”  “The creation of the Arvāksrotas beings was the seventh . . .” — 1:73, 75 (i.5)

— 163 —

It is not Brahmâ who creates . . . but the chief and Lord of the Prajâpati
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “Daksha is a son of Brahmā; he is one of the Prajāpatis, and is sometimes regarded as their chief.” — p. 76
Obeying the command of Brahmâ, Daksha . . . made superior and inferior . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Daksha . . . Obeying the command of Brahmā, he made movable and immovable things {avara and vara, ‘inferior’ and ‘superior’ . . . refer to putra, Professor Wilson’s ‘progeny’}, bipeds and quadrupeds, and, subsequently, by his will, gave birth to females . . .” — 2:9-10 & fn. (i.15)
the Asuras are the first beings created from the “body of night”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā . . . thus concentrated, the quality of darkness pervaded his body; and thence the demons (the Asuras) were first born . . .”  “. . . Brahmā transformed himself into night, invested with a body.” — 1:79-80, 82 fn. (i.5)
the Pitris issue from that of Twilight
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the progenitors (the Pitṛis) were born from his side.  The body, when he abandoned it, became the Sandhyā (or evening twilight) . . .” — 1:80-1 (i.5)
the “gods” . . . from the “body of the day”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . from his mouth proceeded the gods . . . The form abandoned by him became day . . .” — 1:80 (i.5)
Brahmâ . . . “creating fierce beings, denominated Bhûtas . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The creator of the world, being incensed, then created fierce beings, who were denominated . . . Bhūtas (malignant fiends), and eaters of flesh {‘fiends, frightful from being monkey-coloured, and carnivorous’}.” — 1:83 & fn. (i.5)
the Rakshasas are generally . . . “Evil Spirits” and “the enemies of the gods”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “RĀKSHASAS. . . . evil spirits . . . classified as of three sorts — one as a set of beings like the Yakshas, another as a sort of Titans or enemies of the gods, and lastly, in the common acceptation of the term, demons and fiends who haunt cemeteries . . . and vex and afflict mankind in all sorts of ways.” — pp. 254-5
When Hanuman is reconnoitering the enemy in Lanka . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “When Hanumān entered the city of Lankā to reconnoitre . . . he saw that ‘the Rākshasas sleeping in the houses were of every shape and form.  Some of them disgusted the eye, while some were beautiful to look upon.’ ” — p. 255
Rakshasas . . . becoming the Saviours of “Humanity,” or Brahmâ
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Brahmā . . . put forth, in darkness, beings emaciate with hunger, of hideous aspects . . . Those beings hastened to the deity. . . . {‘Those among them that called out “Not so: oh! let him be saved!” were named Rākshasas.’}.” — 1:82 & fn. (i.5)
the too-selfish . . . Rakshasas showing the desire . . . to “devour” Mahat
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Brahmā transformed himself into night, invested with a body.  This the Yakshas and Rākshasas seized upon, exclaiming ‘. . . devour it.’ ” — 1:82 fn. (i.5)

— 164 —

the true dual Logos
see: Friedrich Ueberweg, History of Philosophy, 1875: “The highest of all the divine forces is the Logos . . . [Philo] seems to conceive Sophia [divine Wisdom] as the highest of the potencies into which the Logos is divided, and as the source of all the rest.  For the Logos is two-fold in its nature . . .” — 1:230

— Footnotes [164-5]

Whom Manu calls “our paternal grandfathers” . . . The Rudras
p/q: Mānava-Dherma-Sāstra, ed. G. C. Haughton, 1825: “ ‘The wise call . . . our paternal grandfathers, Rudras . . .’ ” — 2:103 (iii.284)
The Rudras are the seven manifestations of Rudra-Siva
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘Rudra be thy name’, rejoined the great father of all creatures . . . and Brahmā therefore gave to him seven other denominations: and to these eight persons regions and wives and posterity belong.” — 1:115-16 (i.8)
Rudra-Siva, “the destroying god”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The Rudra of the Vedas has developed in the course of ages into the great and powerful god Śiva . . . Under the name of Rudra or Mahā-kāla, he is the great destroying and dissolving power.  But destruction in Hindu belief implies reproduction; so as Śiva . . . he is the reproductive power which is perpetually restoring that which has been dissolved . . .” — pp. 297-8
and also the grand Yogi and ascetic
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “Thirdly, he [Śiva] is the Mahā-yogī, the great ascetic, in whom is centred the highest perfection of austere penance and abstract meditation . . .” — p. 298
See § II., §§ I, Commentary [shadows of their progenitors]
see: Stanza IV, 15: “ ‘Having projected their shadows and made men of one element (ether), the progenitors re-ascend to Maha-loka . . . The subtle bodies remain without understanding (Manas) until the advent of the Suras (Gods) now called Asuras (not Gods),’ says the Commentary.” — SD 2:92
“How did life, the living world of organisms, arise? . . .”
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “. . . first the general question: ‘How did life, the living world of organisms, arise?’ and, secondly, the special question: ‘How did the human race originate?’  The first of these two inquiries, that as to the first appearance of living beings, can only be decided empirically by proof of the so-called Archeobiosis, or equivocal generation, or the spontaneous production of organisms of the simplest conceivable kind.  Such are the Monera (Protogenes, Protamœba, Protomyxa, Vampyrella), exceedingly simple microscopic masses of protoplasm without structure or organisation which take in nutriment and reproduce themselves by division.” — pp. 32-3
“Such a Moneron as that primordial organism discovered by . . . Huxley . . .”
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “Such a Moneron as that primordial organism discovered by the renowned English zoologist Huxley and named Bathybius Haeckelii, appears as a continuous thick protoplasmic covering at the greatest depths of the ocean, between 3,000 and 30,000 feet.  It is true that the first appearance of such Monera has not up to the present moment been actually observed; but there is nothing instrinsically improbable in such an Evolution.” — p. 33
“in that case man also has beyond a doubt . . .”
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “In that case man also has, beyond a doubt, arisen from lower Mammalia, apes, the earlier simian creatures, the still earlier Marsupialia, Amphibia, Pisces, by progressive transformations.” — p. 36
all produced by “a series of natural forces working blindly . . .”
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “Darwin puts in the place of a conscious creative force . . . a series of natural forces working blindly (as we say) without aim, without design.” — p. 34

— 165 —

“The ‘Sons of Passive Yoga.’ . . .”
see: Stanza VI, 7: “This Third Race is sometimes called collectively ‘the sons of Passive Yoga,’ i.e., it was produced unconsciously by the second Race, which, as it was intellectually inactive, is supposed to have been constantly plunged in a kind of blank or abstract contemplation . . .” — SD 1:207

— Footnotes

“Not so! oh let him be saved (preserved)”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Brahmā . . . put forth, in darkness, beings emaciate with hunger, of hideous aspects . . . Those beings hastened to the deity. . . . {‘Those among them that called out “Not so: oh! let him be saved!” were named Rākshasas.’} {From Raksh . . . ‘to preserve’}.” — 1:82 & fns. (i.5)
“Do not spare it; devour it.” . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “It is related, in the Bhāgavata-purāṇa, III., 20, 19-21, that Brahmā transformed himself into night, invested with a body.  This the Yakshas and Rākshasas seized upon, exclaiming ‘Do not spare it; devour it.’  Brahmā cried out ‘Don’t devour me; spare me.’ ” — 1:82 fn.

— 166 —

Fission . . .
see: Oscar Schmidt, Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “The simplest beings . . . such as the Protamœba . . . This is the simplest case of reproduction, a multiplication by division.  Frequently . . . the motion of the minute constituents, which causes the fission, proceeds in such a manner that the halves are again divided, and the quarters yet again . . . and the parent-creature is resolved into a swarm of off-shoots.” — pp. 40-1
the division of the homogeneous speck of protoplasm . . .
p/q: Samuel Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian, 1890: “When we begin . . . with those Monera which are simple specks of homogeneous protoplasm, we find them multiplying by self-division.” — p. 103
the nucleated cell, in which the cell-nucleus splits into two . . .
p/q: Samuel Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian, 1890: “The next earliest stage in the evolution of living matter, the nucleated cell . . . splits into two, each of which becomes a new nucleus . . . and either multiply within it, or burst the old cell-wall and become two new cells . . .” — p. 104
Budding . . . A small portion . . . swells out at the surface . . .
p/q: Samuel Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian, 1890: “The next stage in advance is that of propagation by germs or buds, in which the organism does not divide . . . but a small portion of it swells out at its surface, and finally parts company and starts on a separate existence which grows to the size of the parent . . .” — p. 104
e.g., many vegetables, the sea-anemone, etc.
see: Samuel Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian, 1890: “This process may be witnessed any day in . . . the sea-anemone . . . It remains one of the principal modes of propagation of the vegetable world, where plants are multiplied from buds even after they have developed the higher mode of sexual propagation by seeds.” — p. 104

— Footnotes

Weber’s idea that the Indo-Germanic Race preceded the Aryan . . .
see: Albrecht Weber, History of Indian Literature, 1882: “The former, the mythological relations, represented in the older hymns of the Ṛik, in part carry us back to the primitive Indo-Germanic time.  They contain relics of . . . conceptions then prevailing, such as may also be traced among the Teutons and Greeks.” — p. 35
healing and cicatrization in the higher animal groups . . .
p/q: Oscar Schmidt, Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “. . . all healing and cicatrization in higher beings . . . is effected only by the reproduction by fission and gemmation of the elementary morphological constituents.” — p. 41

— 167 —

A single cell thrown off by the parent . . . develops into a multicellular organism
p/q: Samuel Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian, 1890: “Advancing still further . . . we find these germ-buds reduced to spores, or single cells, which are emitted from the parent, and afterwards multiply by division until they form a many-celled organism, which has the hereditary qualities of the original one.” — pp. 104-5
e.g., bacteria and mosses
see: Samuel Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian, 1890: “This is the general form of propagation of the lower plants, such as algæ, mosses, and ferns, and also of . . . microscopic organisms, such as bacteria.” — p. 105
Male and female organs inhering in the same individual . . .
see: Samuel Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian, 1890: “In the great majority of plants, and in some of the lower families of animals — for instance, snails and earth-worms — the male and female organs are developed within the same being, and they are what is called hermaphrodites.” — p. 106

— 168 —

those which “were not ready” . . . remained the “narrow-brained” of the Stanza
see: Stanza VII, 24: “The Sons of Wisdom . . . saw the (intellectually) vile forms of the first third (still senseless Race) . . . some projected a spark. . . . The spark burnt low . . . Their Jivas (Monads) were not ready. . . . They (became the) narrow-headed.” — SD 2:161

— Footnotes

neither the dolicho-cephalic nor the brachyo-cephalic . . .
see: Paul Topinard, Anthropology, “Translated from the French,” 1890: “. . . the cephalic index . . . [is] the relation of the maximum transverse diameter to the maximum antero-posterior diameter . . . The extreme indices are found in the long or dolichocephalic skulls of Retzius, and in his round or brachycephalic.” — p. 237
intellectual capacity of a man according to his cranial capacity, seems absurdly illogical
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “. . . the chief value of this table [by Topinard] is to show into what serious errors an estimation of the intellectual development of a race from its cranial capacity would lead us.  By such an estimation, the troglodytes [cavemen] of the cavern of L’Homme-Mort would be superior to all races . . . including contemporary Parisians.” — p. 382
the cranial capacity of the Parisian . . . 1437 cubic centimètres . . .
see: Paul Topinard, Anthropology, 1890: “The Auvergnians have 1523, and the 384 Parisians of M. Broca, 1437 cubic centimètres of capacity.” — p. 229

— 169 —

“Does man descend from one single couple or from several groups . . .”
p/q: André Lefèvre, Philosophy: Historical and Critical, 1879: “Does man descend from one single couple or from several groups? — monogenism or polygenism?  As far as one can venture to pronounce on what, in the absence of witnesses, will never be known, the second hypothesis is by far the most probable.” — p. 498
Hovelacque, in his “Science of Language” comes to a similar conclusion . . .
see: Abel Hovelacque, The Science of Language, 1877: “If the faculty of articulate speech constitutes the sole fundamental characteristic of man . . . and if the different linguistic groups known to us are irreducible, they must have taken birth independently and in quite distinct regions.  It follows that the precursors of man must have acquired the faculty of speech in different localities independently, and have thus given birth to several races of mankind originally distinct.” — p. 304
“The view which appears best to accord with what is now known . . .”
p/q: Charles Bradlaugh, “Anthropology,” 1882: “Professor Flower, in the address from which I have already quoted, contends that ‘the view which appears best to accord with what is now known of the characters and distribution of the races of man . . . may be described as a modification of the monogenistic hypothesis.  Without entering into the difficult question of the method of man’s first appearance upon the world, we must assume for it a vast antiquity, at all events, as measured by any historical standard.’ ” — p. 6 (Hall of Science Thursday Lectures, First Series)
If we had any approach to a complete palæontological record . . .”
p/q: Charles Bradlaugh, “Anthropology,” 1882: “ ‘If we had any approach to a complete palæontological record, the history of man could be reconstructed; but nothing of the kind is forthcoming.’ ” — p. 7 (Hall of Science Thursday Lectures, First Series)
John Crawford and James Hunt . . . favoured polygenesis
see: Paul Topinard, Éléments d’Anthropologie Générale, 1885: “Parmi les monogénistes, jusqu’en 1859, se voient . . . Hodgkin Latham et J. C. Hall . . . Parmi les polygénistes . . . Crawfurd et James Hunt en Angleterre [Until 1859 we find among the monogenists . . . Hodgkin Latham and J. C. Hall . . . Among the polygenists . . . Crawfurd and James Hunt in England] . . .” — p. 86

— 170 —

Evolution is an eternal cycle of becoming, we are taught
see: The Virgin of the World, tr. Kingsford & Maitland, 1885: “. . . matter is the vehicle of becoming.  Becoming is the mode of activity of the uncreate and foreseeing God.  Having been endowed with the germ of becoming, matter is brought into birth, for the creative force fashions it according to the ideal forms.  Matter not yet engendered, had no form; it becomes when it is put into operation.” — pp. 133-4 (Fragments, Part VI)
the succession of beings . . . “consists in an increasing similarity of the living fauna . . .”
p/q: Louis Agassiz & A. A. Gould, Principles of Zoology, Part I, 1857: “. . . [the] aim, in forming the earth . . . and in creating successively all the different types of animals which have passed away, was to introduce Man upon the surface of our globe.  Man is the end towards which all the animal creation has tended, from the first appearance of the first Palæozoic Fishes.” — p. 238
“all things had their origin in spirit . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “. . . all things had their origin in spirit — evolution having originally begun from above and proceeded downward, instead of the reverse, as taught in the Darwinian theory.” — 1:154

— 171 —

Not all the organisms were sufficiently ready . . .
see: Stanza VII, 24: “Those who received but a spark . . . were not ready.  These were set apart . . . The third were ready.  In these shall we dwell, said the Lords of the Flame . . .” — SD 2:161
on geographical considerations . . . “Lemuria,” invented by Mr. P. L. Sclater
see: Alfred Russel Wallace, The Malay Archipelago, 1869: “. . . the existence of such a land [bridge] has been already thought necessary, to account for the distribution . . . of the Lemurs. . . . Dr. Sclater has proposed for the hypothetical continent connecting these distant points . . . the name of Lemuria. . . . the student of geographical distribution must see in the extraordinary and isolated productions of Celebes proofs of the former existence of some continent from whence the ancestors of these creatures . . . could have been derived.” — 1:283-4
He traces . . . human evolution to “Lemuria” . . . that “cradle of mankind”
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “It was a branch . . . of this extensive catarrhine group, that . . . evolved the ancestor of the human race. . . . it occurred in Southern Asia . . . Probably Southern Asia itself was not the earliest cradle of the human race; but Lemuria, a continent that lay to the south of Asia, and sank later on beneath the surface of the Indian Ocean.” — p. 73
Vogt . . . in America Man sprang from a branch of the platyrrhine apes
see: Paul Topinard, “The Last Steps in the Genealogy of Man,” 1889: “Fossil monkeys have been found in America. . . . as if the platyrrhine monkeys had always lived there. . . . In short, one is led in America to a special series so constituted by its origin and its termination . . . Vogt, Schmidt, and Cope, have agreed on this [platyrrhine] . . . descent.” — p. 680 (Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution)
see: Carl Vogt, Lectures on Man, 1864: “If the Macaci [macaques] in the Senegal, the baboons on the Gambia, and the gibbons in Borneo could become developed into anthropoid apes, we cannot see why the American [platyrrhine] apes should not be capable of a similar development.” — p. 466
independently of the origination . . . from the old world catarrhinians
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “. . . [Haeckel] states . . . ‘The human race is a branch of the catarrhine group; he was developed in the old world, and sprang from apes of this group, which have long been extinct.’ . . . Vogt disagrees . . . He admits that different simian stocks may have given rise to different human groups.  The populations of the old and the new world would thus be descendants of the different forms which are peculiar to the two continents.” — p. 104

— Footnotes

This is explained in the section which follows . . . (Vide §§ II . . .)
see: §§ 2, “A Saint — Hypnotised”: “Kandu is a sage and a Yogi, eminent in holy wisdom and pious austerities, which, finally, awaken the jealousy of the gods . . . Indra . . . sends one of his female Apsarasas to tempt the sage.”  “She succeeds . . . ‘907 years six months and three days’ spent in her company seem to the sage as one day.  When this psychological or hypnotic state ends, the Muni curses . . . ‘Depart, begone!’ . . . And Pramlochā, terrified, flies away, wiping the perspiration from her body with the leaves of the trees as she passes through the air. . . . the child she had conceived by the Rishi came forth from the pores of her skin in drops of perspiration.” — SD 2:174, 175
in the allegory from the Puranas concerning Kandu . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77, Book I, Chap. XV [Legend of Kaṇḍu], 2:2-5.
This unwillingness to . . . create, is symbolized in the Purânas by . . . Narada . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “HARYAŚWAS.  Five [or ten] thousand sons of the patriarch Daksha, begotten by him for the purpose of peopling the earth.  The sage Nārada dissuaded them from producing offspring . . .” — p. 120
the “strife-making ascetic”
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “. . . Brahmā advised his son Nārada to marry, but Nārada censured his father as a false teacher, because devotion to Kṛishṇa was the only true means of felicity.  Brahmā then cursed Nārada to lead a life of sensuality . . . and Nārada retorted the curse, condemning Brahmā to lust after his own daughter . . . Nārada has the appellations, Kali-kāraka, ‘strife-maker’ . . .” — p. 219

— 172 —

“the accursed Cainite Races”
see: The Book of Adam and Eve, tr. S. C. Malan, 1882: “. . . the children of Seth went astray and fell . . .”  “For all the rest went down from the mountain and fell into sin with the children of Cain.” — pp. 140, 141 (ii.22)
      “. . . the children of Seth gathered together . . . And when they were come down and saw the daughters of Cain the accursed, those sons of Seth committed adultery with them . . . Of these adulteries giants were born.” — p. 230 (Bk ii, Note 26)

— Footnotes

“the fact of the separation of sexes . . .”
p/q: Oscar Schmidt, The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “. . . one of the most remarkable examples of the formation of varieties on the same territory . . . [is] the fact of the separation of the sexes, as to derivation of which from species once hermaphrodite, all (the believers in Creation naturally excepted) are assuredly of one accord.” — p. 159
“a study of embryology . . . shows that in the human . . .”
p/q: Samuel Laing, A Modern Zoroastrian, 1890: “This is confirmed by a study of embryology, which shows that in the human and higher animal species the distinction of sex is not developed until a considerable progress has been made in the growth of the embryo.” — p. 106

— 173 —

“Sanandana and the other sons of Vedhas” . . . “without desire or passion . . .”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Sanandana and the other sons of Brahmā {Vedhas} were previously created by him.  But they were without desire or passion, inspired with holy wisdom, estranged from the universe, and undesirous of progeny.” — 1:100-2 & fn. (i.7)
Kriyasakti — the mysterious power of thought . . .”
p/q: T. Subba Row, “The Twelve Signs of the Zodiac,” 1885: “Kriyāsakti: — The mysterious power of thought which enables it to produce external, perceptible, phenomenal results by its own inherent energy.  The ancients held that any idea will manifest itself externally if one’s attention is deeply concentrated upon it.  Similarly an intense volition will be followed by the desired result.  A Yogi generally performs his wonders by means of Itchāsakti [power of the will] and Kriyāsakti.” — p. 111 (Five Years of Theosophy)
the chapters on “The Fallen Angels” and “The Mystic Dragons”
see: Stanza XII, “The ‘Great Dragons’ and Serpents,” SD 2:351-90; and § XVIII, “On the Myth of the ‘Fallen Angel,’ in its Various Aspects,” SD 2:475-505.

— 174 —

Sanjnâ . . . “unable to endure the fervours of her lord,” gave him her chhaya . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Sanjnā, the daughter of Viśwakarman, was the wife of the Sun . . . Unable to endure the fervours of her lord, Sanjnā gave him Chhāyā {her shadow, or image} . . . and repaired to the forests, to practise devout exercises {tapas}.  The Sun, supposing Chhāyā to be his wife Sanjnā, begot, by her, three other children . . .” — 3:20-1 & fns. (iii.2)
like Adam with Lilith — an ethereal shadow
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The Qabbalists hold that Adam was first created with a spiritual body, which is described in the O. T. as ‘of dust’ . . . We also have in the archaic cuneiform tablets, the Lilatu or Lilith . . . the handmaid of the ghost; Lil was in Akkadian ‘a cloud of dust’ . . . Myth makes her the wife of Adam . . .” — pp. 247-8
Kandu is a sage and a Yogi, eminent in holy wisdom . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘There was formerly (said Soma) a sage named Kaṇḍu, eminent in holy wisdom . . .’ ” — 2:2 (i.15)
Indra, the “King of the Gods” . . . sends one of his female Apsarasas . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The king of the gods sent the nymph Pramlochā to disturb his penance; and the sweet-smelling damsel diverted the sage from his devotions.” — 2:2 (i.15)

— 175 —

“907 years six months and three days” spent in her company seem . . . as one day
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the nymph replied, that they had lived together nine hundred and seven years, six months, and three days.  The Muni asked her . . . if she was in jest; for it appeared to him that they had spent but one day together.” — 2:3 (i.15)
the Muni curses . . . “Depart, begone! . . . vile bundle of illusions!” . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘Yet fie upon thee . . . vile bundle of delusion!’ . . . ‘Depart, begone.’  She then, reproached by him, went forth from his dwelling, and, passing through the air, wiped the perspiration from her person with the leaves of the trees.” — 2:5 (i.15)
She went from tree to tree . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The nymph went from tree to tree, and, as, with the dusky shoots that crowned their summits, she dried her limbs . . . the child she had conceived by the Ṛishi came forth from the pores of her skin, in drops of perspiration.  The trees received the living dews; and the winds collected them into one mass.” — 2:5 (i.15)
“This,” said Soma . . . “I matured by my rays . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘This’, said Soma, ‘I matured by my rays; and gradually it increased in size, till the exhalation that had rested on the tree-tops became the lovely girl named Mārishā.’ ” — 2:5 (i.15)
Adam . . . into which the “Lord-god” breathes the breath of life . . .
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life . . .” — p. 3 (Genesis, 2:7)
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “. . . a distinction was made by the learned of the Israëlites, between the higher Adam . . . who was the Light of the World . . . and the inferior (the terrestrial) Adam . . . who had only ‘the breath of life’ but not ‘the living soul.’ ” — p. 114
Manas . . . is of the Earth earthy, though its highest faculties connect it with . . . divine Soul
see: The Holy Bible, ed. F. C. Cook, 1881: “The first man is of the earth, earthy: the second man is the Lord from heaven {Adam before he had become actually to be a living soul-nature was already fashioned out of earth. . . . the material or earthy and human . . . side of the first man’s origin is sharply contrasted with the spiritual or divine side of the origin of the Godman}.” — 3:369 & fn. (1 Corinthians, 15:47)
Kamadeva, the god of love . . . and lord of the Apsarasas . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “KĀMA, KĀMA-DEVA.  The god of love.”  “He is lord of the Apsarases or heavenly nymphs.” — pp. 145, 146

— Footnotes

Vivien’s temptation of Merlin (Tennyson)
see: “Idylls of the King” [Review], 1859: “In the second Idyll, Mr Tennyson relates the history of the enchantment of Merlin by the Lady of the Lake . . . [or] Vivien —  the name which the poet adopts.  The destruction of the great sage, or ‘wizard,’ of his time . . . by the wiles of an enchantress . . . is what may be called a great representative subject. . . . the marvellous defect of human nature, and the nullity of the best human wisdom in the face of temptation.” — p. 165 (North British Review, v. 31)

— 176 —

“Thou hast performed the office assigned by the monarch of the gods . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The pious sage . . . turned to the nymph . . . and said to her: ‘Go, deceitful girl, whither thou wilt.  Thou has performed the office assigned thee by the monarch of the gods, — of disturbing my penance by thy fascinations.” — 2:4 (i.15)
Kama . . . is in the Rig Veda . . . the first movement that stirred the One . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “KĀMA . . . In the Ṛig-veda (x. 129) desire is said to have been the first movement that arose in the One after it had come into life through the power of fervour or abstraction.” — pp. 145-6
“Desire first arose in It, which was the primal germ of mind . . .”
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ ‘Desire first arose in It, which was the primal germ of mind; (and which) sages, searching with their intellect, have discovered in their heart to be the bond which connects entity with non-entity.’ ” — p. 146
A hymn in the Atharva Veda exalts Kama into a supreme God . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ ‘This Kāma or desire . . . is celebrated in a curious hymn of the Atharva-veda,’ which exalts Kāma into a supreme God and Creator: ‘Kāma was born the first.  Him neither gods, nor fathers, nor men have equalled.’ ” — p. 146
The Atharva Veda identifies him with Agni . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ ‘Kāma is also in the same Veda often identified with Agni, and . . . Kāma may be looked upon as a superior form of the other deity.’ ” — p. 146
The Taittariya Brâhmana makes him . . . the son of Dharma . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “According to the Taittirīya Brāhmaṇa, he is the son of Dharma, the god of justice, by Śraddhā, the goddess of faith . . .” — p. 146
Kama is born from the heart of Brahmâ . . . he is Atma-Bhu “Self-Existent” . . .
p/q: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “Another account represents him as springing from the heart of Brahmā . . . he is Ātma-bhū, ‘self-existent,’ and therefore he is called . . . A-ja, ‘unborn’ . . .” — p. 146
in his orginal Vedic character, (Harivamsa making him a son of Lakshmi . . .)
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “. . . according to the Hari-vanśa he is the son of Lakshmī.” — p. 146
Lakshmi, who is Venus
see: Edward Balfour, Cyclopædia of India, 1885: “There is an allegory of Kama being an avatara or son of . . . Vishnu and Lakshmi, and this is a further instance of the correspondence of that goddess with the Roman Venus, the mother of Cupid.” — 2:484
before . . . Daksha . . . men were procreated “by the will, by sight, by touch . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Before the time of Daksha, they were variously propagated, — by the will, by sight, by touch, and by the influence of religious austerities practised by devout sages and holy saints.” — 2:10 (i.15)
Mârishâ . . . is taken to wife by the Prachetasas . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Soma having concluded, the Prachetasas [Prajāpatis] took Mārishā, as he had enjoined them, righteously to wife . . . and upon her they begot the eminent patriarch Daksha . . . {Daksha seems to be an irregular adjunct to the Prajāpatis or mind-born sons of Brahmā}.  This great sage, for the furtherance of creation, and the increase of mankind, created progeny. . . . and, subsequently, by his will, gave birth to females . . . From that period forwards, living creatures were engendered by sexual intercourse.” — 2:9-10 & fn. (i.15)

— Footnotes

“From Brahmâ were born mind-engendered progeny . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “From Brahmā . . . were born mind-engendered progeny, with forms and faculties derived from his corporeal nature; embodied spirits, produced from the person {‘limbs’, gātra} of that all-wise {Dhīmat} deity.  All these beings . . . being the abode of the three qualities.” — 1:100 & fns. (i.7)
deva-sarga (divine creation . . .)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “This, termed the creation of immortals {Deva-sarga}, was the third performance of Brahmā . . .” — 1:72-3 & fn. (i.5)
the five-fold creation, is devoid of clearness . . . without reflection . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “ ‘Of him [Brahmā] meditating was a fivefold creation — viz., of things — without reflection, devoid of clearness . . . dull of nature, essentially immovable.’ ” — 1:70 fn. (i.5)
“But as they did not multiply themselves . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “But, as they did not multiply themselves, Brahmā created other mind-born sons, like himself; namely: Bhṛigu, Pulastya . . . Marīchi, Daksha, Atri, and Vasishṭha. . . . {Considerable variety prevails in this list of Prajāpatis . . . or Brahmarshis}.” — 1:100 & fn. (i.7)
“Sanandana and the other sons of Vedhas . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Sanandana and the other sons of Brahmā {Vedhas} were previously created by him.  But they were without desire or passion, inspired with holy wisdom, estranged from the universe, and undesirous of progeny.” — 1:100-2 & fn. (i.7)

— 176-7 —

Daksha, a son of Brahmâ also, in a former Kalpa . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The second birth of Daksha, and his share in the peopling of the earth, is narrated in most of the Purāṇas in a similar manner. . . . The incompatibility of the two accounts is reconciled by referring the two Dakshas to different Manwantaras; the Daksha who proceeded from Brahmā as a Prajāpati being born in the first, or Swāyaṃbhuva, and the son of the Prachetasas, in the Chākshusha, Manwantara.” — 2:9 fn.

— 177 —

Mârishâ . . . the mother of Daksha. . . . the father of the first human-like progenitors
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the Prachetasas took Mārishā . . . and upon her they begot the eminent patriarch Daksha . . .”  “In what manner Daksha created living creatures . . . you shall hear.  In the first place, he willed into existence the deities, the Ṛishis . . . Finding that his will-born progeny did not multiply themselves, he determined, in order to secure their increase, to establish sexual intercourse as the means of multiplication.” — 2:9, 12 (i.15)
Aristophanes describes the nature of the old race as androgynous . . .
see: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “Plato, in the ‘Banquet,’ has preserved to us the discourse of Aristophanes on the subject.  ‘Our nature of old was not the same as it is now.  It was androgynous . . .’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
see: Plato, Works, v. 3, tr. George Burges, 1850: “In good truth . . . said Aristophanes . . . you must first learn the nature of man . . . For our nature of old was not the same as it is now . . .  It was then man-woman {hermaphrodite}, whose form and name partook of and was common to both the male and the female.” — p. 508 (The Banquet, § 16)
every individual being rounded, “having the back and sides as in a circle” . . .
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “ ‘The entire form of every individual was rounded, having the back and sides as in a circle . . . Their bodies thus were round, and the manner of their running was circular.  They were terrible in force and strength, and had prodigious ambition.’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
to make them weaker, “Zeus divided them . . . into two . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “ ‘Hence Zeus (Jove) divided each of them into two, making them weaker; Apollo, under his direction, closed up the skin.’ ” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
a tradition about the first man, who lived at first without eating . . .
see: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “The inhabitants of Madagascar say that the first man was created . . . free from ills, wants, and appetites of mundane life, and that he was strictly forbidden to eat or drink.  The Great Enemy, disguised as a shining angel, pretended to bring a message from heaven, setting aside the prohibition.” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
having indulged in food, a swelling appeared in his leg . . .
see: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “He then ate; a slight swelling appeared on his leg, and enlarged to a tumor, which, finally bursting . . . there emerged a beautiful girl, who became at maturity the mother of the race.” — p. 113 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
“We have our sciences of Heterogenesis and Parthenogenesis . . .”
p/q: Alexander Wilder, “The Primeval Race Double-Sexed,” Feb. 1883: “We have our sciences of heterogenesis and parthenogenesis, showing that the field is yet open. . . . The polyps . . . produce their offspring from themselves like the buds and ramifications of a tree.” — pp. 112-13 (The Theosophist, v. 4)
The very interesting polyp Stauridium . . . produces gemmules . . .
see: Oscar Schmidt, The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “. . . a polype-shaped being with cruciform tentacles . . . [the] Cross-polype, or Stauridium.  This animal, growing like a polype upon a stalk, forms above its lower cross, gemmules which . . . gradually assume a bell-like shape, and detach themselves on attaining the structure and form of a Medusa or sea-nettle.” — p. 42
The Medusa is utterly dissimilar to its parent-organism . . .
p/q: Oscar Schmidt, The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “The Medusa . . . is thus the offspring of its utterly dissimilar parent, the Stauridium; it reproduces itself in the sexual method, and from its eggs proceed Stauridia.  The two generations thus alternate . . .” — p. 42

— 178 —

“The majority of mankind belongs to the seventh sub-race . . .”
p/q: A. P. Sinnett, Esoteric Buddhism, 1885: “ ‘The majority of mankind belongs to the seventh sub-race of the fourth root-race — the above mentioned Chinamen and their offshoots and branchlets (Malayans, Mongolians, Tibetans, Javanese, &c., &c.) — with remnants of other sub-races of the fourth and the seventh sub-race of the third race.’ ” — p. 68
Padmapani, or Avalôkitêswara in Sanskrit, is in Tibetan Chenresi.
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “Padmapāni has in the sacred books a great many names . . . Most frequently he is addressed by the name of Chenresi . . . in Sanskrit Avalōkitēsvara.” — pp. 88-9
Avalôkitêswara is the great Logos in its highest aspect
see: T. Subba Row, “Notes on the Bhagavad Gita — I,” Feb. 1887: “Now this Parabrahmam which exists before all things in the cosmos is the one essence from which starts into existence a centre of energy . . . the Logos. . . . It is called Avalokiteswara by the Buddhists.” — p. 303 (The Theosophist, v. 8)
Padmapani-Avalôkitêswara is called . . . Chenresi Vanchug . . .
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “The Dhyāni Bōdhisattva Padmapāni . . . addressed by the name of Chenresi, or more fully Chenresi vanchug, ‘the powerful, looking with the eyes,’ in Sanskrit Avalōkitēswara.” — pp. 88-9
protector . . . of Tibet in particular
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “The Dhyāni Bōdhisattva Padmapāni . . . [is] the one most frequently implored, on account of his being the representative of Sākyamuni and the guardian and propagator of his faith . . . [and] his particular protection of Tibet.” — p. 88
manifesting himself from age to age in human form
p/q: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “In order to show the Tibetans the path to ultimate happiness, he has been pleased, they say, to manifest himself, from age to age, in human shape.” — p. 88
A popular legend has it that whenever faith begins to die out . . .
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “There is a story relating that Tsonkhapa himself had ordered his two principal disciples to take upon themselves a mortal form . . . to watch over the propagation of the Buddhist faith and the maintenance of its purity; and . . . it was Tsonkhapa who created these two [Dalai Lama and Panchen Rinpoche] . . .” — p. 153
Padmapani Chenresi . . . emits a brilliant ray of light . . .
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “The Dalai Lama is viewed as an incarnation of the Dhyāni Bōdhisattva Chenresi, who is supposed to effect his re-incorporation by a beam of light which issues from his body and enters the individual whom he selects for his re-descent.  The Panchen Rinpoche is considered to be an incarnation of Chenresi’s celestial father, Amitābha.” — p. 153
he will incarnate as “the most perfect Buddha” in Tibet, instead of in India . . .
p/q: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “They believe . . . that he shall be finally born as most perfect Buddha in Tibet, instead of in India, where his predecessors had appeared.” — p. 88
Dhyani Chenresi . . . is represented . . . in his eleven-faced form
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “To this name, as well as to that of Phagpa Chenresi, in Sanskrit Aryāvalōkita . . . ‘eleven-faced,’ correspond the representations of him with eleven faces.” — p. 89
a column built in four rows, each series having . . . different complexions . . .
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “The eleven faces form a pyramid, and are ranged in four rows.  Each series of heads has a particular complexion; the three faces which base upon the neck are white, the three following yellow, the next three red . . .” — p. 89

— 178-9 —

In this reference compare Stanza 39.
see: Stanza X, 39: “the first (Race) on every zone was moon-coloured (yellow-white); the Second, yellow, like gold; the Third, red; the Fourth, brown . . .” — SD 2:227

— 179 —

represented with four arms . . . the third hand holds a lotus . . .
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “As Chag zhipa, ‘four-armed,’ he is represented with one head and four arms; two are folded, the third holds a lotus-flower, the fourth . . . a [serpent-] snare.” — p. 89
see: H. A. Jäschke, Tibetan-English Dictionary, 1881: “sbrul-zágs noose consisting of a serpent, for catching any hurtful creature . . . frq. as an attribute of the gods.” — p. 471
on his head the sign of water double_ripple — matter, deluge
see: H. A. Jäschke, Tibetan-English Dictionary, 1881: “ytsug . . . whirlpool, eddy, vortex, in the water . . . flame-shaped hair-tuft on the crown of a Buddha . . .” — p. 433
see: “The Symbolic Hair-Tuft of the Buddha,” The Quest, Jan. 1910: “ ‘. . . [it] is always drawn in Indian pictures in thin wavy lines . . .’  This symbolic representation of the lightning flash . . . was not a zig-zag flash, but a fiery stream, conceived as a fiery whirl-wind, resembling a water-spout, an emanation, efflux or flood circling downwards.” — p. 396
on his brow rests the third eye (Siva’s eye of spiritual insight)
see: E. B. Havell, Indian Sculpture and Painting, 1908: “Plate XIII. shows a very rare and interesting example of ancient Nepalese art . . . The reclining figure of Vajrapāni . . . The third eye in the forehead, symbolic of spiritual insight, is also given to images of the Hindu deity, Siva.” — p. 48
when he has only two arms, he is . . . Chakna-padma-karpo . . .
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “As Chakna padma karpo (in Sanskrit Padmapāni), ‘holding in the hand a white lotus,’ he has two arms, one of which supports a lotus.” — pp. 89-90
His other name is Chantong, “he of the 1,000 eyes” . . .
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “He is called Chantong, ‘with a thousand eyes,’ on account of having ‘the eye of wisdom’ upon each palm of his thousand hands.” — p. 90
Lokapati . . . “Lord of the World”; and Jigten-gonpo . . . “Protector and Saviour . . .”
see: Emil Schlagintweit, Buddhism in Tibet, 1863: “The name Jigten Gonpo (in Sanskrit Lokapati, or Lokanātha), ‘lord of the world, protector, saviour,’ is an allusion to his . . . protecting against all kinds of evil.” — p. 90
the present Maha-Kalpa (the Vârâha), is called Padma . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Of such days and nights is a year of Brahmā composed; and a hundred such years constitute his whole life.  One Parārdha, or half his existence, has expired, terminating with the Mahā Kalpa {The only Kalpas usually specified are . . . the Pādma and the present of Vārāha} called Pādma.” — 1:53 & fn. (i.3)
Theoretically, the Kalpas are infinite . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “In theory, the Kalpas are infinite; as the Bhavishya: . . . ‘Excellent sages, thousands of millions of Kalpas have passed; and as many are to come.’ ” — 1:53 fn.
(Avalôkitêshwara) becomes . . . Kwan-yin, “who assumes any form . . .”
p/q: Joseph Edkins, Chinese Buddhism, 1880: “Birthday of Kwan-shi-yin p‘u-sa (Avalôkitêshwara), 2d month, 19th day. — This fabulous Bodhisattwa has in China been usually represented with female attributes . . . [she] is described as being able to assume any form at pleasure, whether that of Buddhas, Devas, men, or others . . . Kwan-yin is thus able to save any of the inhabitants of . . . the present race of mankind.” — pp. 208-9
The knowledge of the astrological aspect of . . . “magic” feats.
see: Joseph Edkins, Chinese Buddhism, 1880: “As Shakyamuni taught Buddhism, it was an ascetic morality.  His followers soon gave it a decidedly metaphysical cast.  Then followed the materialistic phase, when magic, astrology, and geomancy were developed.” — p. 344
“birth-days” of these Dhyanis — Amitabha (the O-mi to Fo, of China), included
p/q: Joseph Edkins, Chinese Buddhism, 1880: “Birthday of O-mi-to Fo . . . (Amitabha) Buddha, 11th month, 17th day. — The Buddha who rules in the universe to the west of that governed by Shakya, and grants the request of all those who pray to him to admit them to the Western heaven.” — p. 208

— 180 —

since the Monad has passed, after its “first inmetallization” on Globe A . . .
see: The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett, comp. A. T. Barker, 1926: “Having passed through its seven great classes of inmetalliation . . . the monad gives birth to the vegetable kingdom . . .”  “A Round we are agreed to call the passage of a monad from globe ‘A’ to globe ‘Z’ . . . through the encasement in all and each of the four kingdoms, viz., as a mineral, a vegetable, an animal and man . . .” — pp. 79, 80 (Letter XIV, received by A.O.H., July 9, 1882)
the spiritual . . . into the material . . . spirit and matter are equilibrized in Man
see: The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett, comp. A. T. Barker, 1926: “We understand that the man-bearing cycle of necessity . . . consists of thirteen objective globes . . . with a fourteenth world lower still than ours.  Is this correct?”  “There are seven objective and seven subjective globes . . . The former have our earth occupying the lower turning point where spirit-matter equilibrates.” — p. 78 (Letter XIV, received by A.O.H., July 9, 1882)

— 181 —

In the first chapter, animals, whales and fowls . . . are created . . .
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth . . . and every winged fowl . . .”  “So God created man in his own image . . . male and female created he them.” — p. 2 (Genesis, 1:21, 27)
created before the Androgyne Adam
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The Qabbalah . . . claims, that the first account of the Creation in Genesis, referred exclusively to this ideal world and to an ideal man. . . . the Ideal Man is created as an Androgene but in the similitude of Elohim.” — pp. 121-2
In the second, Adam (the sexless) comes first, and the animals . . . after him.
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life . . .”  “And out of the ground the Lord God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam . . .” — p. 3 (Genesis, 2:7, 19)
symbolized, in . . . Genesis, by the deep sleep of Adam
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept . . .” — p. 3 (Genesis, 2:21)
not at all the . . . process of differentiation of sexes . . . (M. Naudin) imagined
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “According to M. Naudin . . . mankind was concealed within a temporary organism . . . At this epoch, he was, properly speaking, neither male nor female; the two sexes were not yet differentiated.” — p. 124
Pulastya is the father of all the Serpents and Nagas
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “PULASTYA.  One of the Prajā-patis or mind-born sons of Brahmā, and one of the great Ṛishis. . . . all the Rākshasas are supposed to have sprung from him.”  “SU-RASĀ.  A Rākshasī, mother of the Nāgas.” — pp. 244, 310
Kasyapa was grandsire, through his wife Tamra, of the birds
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ ‘The self-born Kaśyapa sprang from Time’ . . . Upon Aditi he begat the Ādityas . . . By his other twelve wives he had . . . demons, nāgas, reptiles, birds, and all kinds of living things. . . . He is one of the seven great Ṛishis . . .” — p. 153
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Tāmrā (the wife of Kaśyapa) had six illustrious daughters . . . Śukī gave birth to parrots, owls, and crows; Śyenī, to hawks; Bhāsī, to kites; Gṛidhrī, to vultures; Śuchi, to water-fowl . . .” — 2:72-3 (i.21)
and of Garuda, king of the feathered tribe
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Vinatā bore to Kaśyapa two celebrated sons, Garuḍa and Aruṇa.  The former . . . was the king of the feathered tribes . . .” — 2:73 (i.21)
by his wife Surabhi, he was parent of cows and buffaloes
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “[Kaśyapa’s wife] Surabhi was the mother of cows and buffaloes {the Bhagavata says, of animals with cloven hoofs} . . .” — 2:75 & fn. (i.21)
Nagas — beings wiser than Serpents
see: C. Staniland Wake, Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “ ‘Wise as serpents and harmless as doves’ is an old saying, which probably has a deeper meaning . . . [than] that usually ascribed to it. . . . The Upanishads refer to the science of serpents, by which is meant the wisdom of the mysterious Nagas, who, according to Buddhistic legend . . . ‘occupy a place among the beings superior to man . . .’ ” — pp. 71-2

— Footnotes

In “Hesiod” Zeus creates his third race of men out of ash-trees.
see: Hesiod, Works and Days, tr. Thomas Cooke, 1811:
“But angry Jove [Zeus] in dust this people laid,
  Because no honours to the gods they paid.
  . . . And now a third, a brazen people rise,
  Unlike the former, men of monstrous size . . .” — p. 41 (I: 196-7, 202-3)
“Schrevelius . . . together with Moscopylus and Proclus, tells us, that . . . [Hesiod] intends to inform us, that this race was made out of ashen-trees . . .” — p. 61 (“Notes”)
see: Jacob Grimm, Teutonic Mythology, 1883: “So, by Hesiod’s account . . . the ‘Works and Days’ makes the well-known five races fill five successive ages . . . First came the golden race of blissful daimones, next the silver one of weaker divine beings, thirdly the brazen one of warriors sprung from ash-trees . . . In the third race giants seem to be portrayed . . .” — 2:575
In the “Popol Vuh” the third Race . . . is created out of the tree Tzita . . .
see: Max Müller, Chips from a German Workshop, 1867-75: “Then follows a third creation, man being made of a tree called tzité, woman of the marrow of a reed called sibac.” — 1:335 (ch. 14, “Popol Vuh”)
But Sibac means “egg”
see: J. G. Wilkinson, Manners and Customs of the Ancient Egyptians, 1883: “Sebak, the crocodile-headed deity of Ombos, was another deified form of the sun . . .”  “The crocodile was called in Egyptian em suhu, ‘sprung of an egg.’  They were sacred to Sebak . . .” — 3:189, 334 fn.
In a report . . . to the Cortes by Don Baptista Pino . . . “All the pueblos . . .”
p/q: “Nagaulism, Voodooism, and Other Forms of Crypto-Paganism,” April 1877: “A report addressed to the Cortes in Spain by Don Pedro Bautista Pino in 1812 says: ‘All the pueblos have their estufas — so the natives call subterranean rooms with only a single door, where they assemble . . . these are impenetrable temples where they gather to discuss mysteriously their good or evil fortunes, and the doors are always closed on the Spaniards.’ ” — p. 7 (Catholic World, v. 25)
“They adore the Sun and Moon . . . fire and the great snake . . .”
see: “Nagaulism, Voodooism, and Other Forms of Crypto-Paganism,” April 1877: “ ‘Hence come the adoration they render the sun and moon, and other heavenly bodies, the respect they entertain for fire, etc.’  ‘The Pueblo chiefs . . . perform various simple rites by which the power of the sun and of Montezuma is recognized, as well as the power . . . of the Great Snake . . .’ ” — p. 7 (Catholic World, v. 25)

— 182 —

“In these were incarnated the Lords of the three (upper) worlds . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “There are eleven well-known Rudras, lords of the three worlds . . . But there are a hundred appelations of the immeasurably mighty Rudras.” — 2:24-5 (i.15)
who had been Tushitas, who had been Jayas, who are Adityas
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “There were twelve celebrated deities in a former Manwantara, called Tushitas {In the beginning of the Kalpa, twelve gods, named Jayas, were created . . . They, lost in meditation, neglected his commands; on which he cursed them to be repeatedly born in each Manwantara}, who, upon the approach of the present period . . . were born the sons of Kaśyapa . . . by Aditi . . . thence named the twelve Ādityas . . .” — 1:26-7 & fn.
descendants of the primitive Nagas . . . peopled America
see: James Fergusson, Tree and Serpent Worship, 1868: “. . . if we may trust the antiquaries of the United States, there are great serpent mounds formed of earth, 1,000 feet long and more, which would seem to prove that . . . a race of Serpent Worshippers occupied their places . . .”  “. . . one of the most interesting problems connected with the subject is the supposed connexion between the Serpent Worship of the Old World and that of Central America.  Is it possible it could have migrated . . .?”  “. . . the testimony of the Buddhist scriptures seems to be . . . that Ceylon was inhabited by a Naga race of serpent worshippers . . .” — pp. 38, 54, 55
(America being the Pâtâla . . .)
see: W. S. Blacket, Researches into the Lost Histories of America, 1884: “. . . there are many extracts, which disclose the fact, that, in olden times, there must have been intercourse between India and America.”  “. . . in the Vishnu Purana . . . [is] an account of the Patalas, which will be hereafter identified with other parts of North America . . .”  “There is every reason to believe, that the mound cities of North America are described in the records of the ancient world . . .” — pp. 67, 68, 166
traditions and legends — the latter always more true than history
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . Augustin Thierry . . . ‘Il y trouvait la véritable histoire, et il avait raison; car la légende est la tradition vivante, et trois fois sur quatre elle est plus vraie que l’histoire’ [Augustin Thierry . . . ‘There he found true history, and he was right, for legend is living tradition, and three times out of four it is truer than history’].” — 2:45
Nagalism, called “devil-worship” by the Missionaries
see: “Nagaulism, Voodooism, and Other Forms of Crypto-Paganism,” April 1877: “The Abbé Domenech . . . [gives] details as to the mode of worship in New Orleans . . . the use of serpents, the dances . . .”  “. . . it is certainly attended with ceremonies which . . . should cause it to be rooted out, even by those who would regard the direct worship of the devil as something with which the state cannot interfere.” — p. 9 (Catholic World, v. 25)
the “Sacrifice of Daksha” . . . the oldest account . . . in Vayu Purâna
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “SACRIFICE OF DAKSHA.  (From the Vāyu Purāṇa.) . . . {The story is told in much more detail in several other Purāṇas . . . but the above has been selected as a specimen of the style of the Vāyu Purāṇa, and as being a narration which . . . is, probably, of an ancient date}.” — 1:120, 121 fn.
This head . . . is replaced by the head of a ram (Kasi-Khanda)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The Linga and Bhāgavata both state that Vīrabhadra cut off Daksha’s head, and threw it into the fire.  After the fray, therefore, when Śiva restored the dead to life . . . Daksha’s head was not forthcoming.  It was, therefore, replaced by the head of a goat, or, according to the Kāśī Khāṇḍa, that of a ram.” — 1:132 fn.
Siva-Rudra creates the terrible Virabhadra . . . the “thousand-headed . . .”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the mighty Maheśwara [Śiva] created, from his mouth . . . a divine being with a thousand heads, a thousand eyes, a thousand feet; wielding a thousand clubs, a thousand shafts . . .”  “ ‘Sovereign of the gods, command what it is that I must do for thee’; to which Maheśwara replied: ‘Spoil the sacrifice of Daksha.’ ” — 1:128, 129-30

— Footnotes

Sarpa (serpent) is from the root Srip, serpo to creep . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Beholding them [the Yakshas] . . . the hairs of Brahmā were shrivelled up . . . falling from his head . . . they became serpents, called Sarpa, from their creeping, and Ahi, because they had deserted the head {From Sṛip . . . serpo, ‘to creep’, and from Hā . . . ‘to abandon’}.” — 1:83 & fn. (i.5)

— 182-3 —

Virabhadra, “abiding in the region of the ghosts . . . created from the pores . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Vīrabhadra, the fierce, abiding in the region of ghosts, is the minister of the anger of Devī.  And he then created, from the pores of his skin, powerful demigods {Raumas}, the mighty attendants upon Rudra . . . who started, by hundreds and thousands, into existence.” — 1:130 & fn.

— 183 —

created from the pores . . . (or Raumyas)
see: Mahabharata, “Çanti Parva,” v. 2 [tr. K. M. Ganguli], 1891: “He then created from the pores of his body a large number of spirit-chiefs known by the name of Raumyas.” — p. 482 (Mokshadharma Parva, cclxxxiii)
the Raumyas . . . from the Romakupas, hair or skin pores
see: Albrecht Weber, History of Indian Literature, 1882: “. . . in Mahā-Bhārata xii.10308, the Raumyas are said to have been created from the roma-kūpas (‘hair-pores’) of Vīrabhadra, at the destruction of Daksha’s sacrifice . . .” — p. 253 fn.
Daksha’s sacrifice . . . in the presence of creatures born from the egg . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Daksha commenced a holy sacrifice . . . The Ādityas, Vasus, Rudras, Maruts . . . were present.  The (four classes of Pitṛis) . . . came along with Brahmā.  Creatures of every class, born from the womb, the egg, from vapour, or vegetation, came upon their invocation . . .” — 1:122-3
obeying the command, he made “inferior and superior” . . . progeny
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Obeying the command of Brahmā, he made movable and immovable things {The Sanskrit has avara and vara, ‘inferior’ and ‘superior’}, bipeds and quadrupeds, and, subsequently, by his will, gave birth to females . . . Of these, the gods, the Titans, the snake-gods, cattle, and . . . the spirits of evil {Dānava}, and other beings, were born.” — 2:10 & fns. (i.15)
“From that period forward, living creatures were engendered . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “From that period forwards, living creatures were engendered by sexual intercourse.  Before the time of Daksha, they were variously propagated, — by the will, by sight, by touch, and by the influence of religious austerities practised by devout sages . . .” — 2:10 (i.15)
The missing links . . . between reptile and bird . . . the ornithoscelidæ
see: Oscar Schmidt, The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “But it is . . . in the division comprising several families which Huxley terms Ornithoscelidæ, or reptiles with the legs of a bird, that we must look for the actual progenitors of the birds.” — p. 263
hesperornis, and the archæopteryx of Vogt
see: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “It is now generally admitted by biologists . . . that birds have come down to us through the Dinosaurs . . . The classes of birds and reptiles as now living are separated by a gulf . . . this gap has been virtually filled by the discoveries of bird-like reptiles and reptilian birds. . . . Archæopteryx of the old world, and . . . Hesperornis of the new, are the stepping-stones . . .”  “Vogt regards the Archæopteryx ‘as neither reptile nor bird, but as constituting an intermediate type.’ ” — pp. 38 fn., 39 fn.

— 184 —

“Use and disuse combined with selection elucidate . . .”
p/q: Oscar Schmidt, The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “Use and disuse, combined with selection, elucidate the separation of the sexes, and the existence, otherwise totally incomprehensible, of rudimentary sexual organs.  In the Vertebrata especially, each sex possesses such distinct traces of the reproductive apparatus characteristic of the other, that even antiquity assumed hermaphroditism as a natural primæval condition of mankind.” — p. 186
“The tenacity with which the rudiments of sexual organs are inherited . . .”
p/q: Oscar Schmidt, The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “The tenacity with which these rudiments of sexual organs are inherited is very remarkable.  In the class of mammals actual hermaphroditism is unheard of, although through the whole period of their development they drag along with them these residues, borne by their unknown ancestry no one can say how long.” — p. 187
those which had no spark (thenarrow-brained”)
see: Stanza VII, 24: “Those who received but a spark remained destitute of (higher) knowledge. . . . The Third remained mindless. . . . These were set apart . . . They (became the) narrow-headed.” — SD 2:161

— Footnotes

The “Unknown Ancestry” . . . are the primeval astral prototypes. . . .
see: “Archaic Teachings in the Purānas and Genesis”: “ ‘What relation is there between the Third Round astral prototypes and ordinary physical development in the course of the origination of pre-mammalian organic species?’ . . . One is the shadowy prototype of the other . . .” — SD 2:256

— 185 —

The “Sons of Wisdom” had spurned the early Third Race . . .
see: Stanza VII, 24: “The Sons of Wisdom . . . saw the (intellectually) vile forms of the first third (still senseless Race) . . . The third remained mindless. . . . These were set apart . . .” — SD 2:161
incarnating in . . . the later Third Race
see: Stanza VII, 24: “The [later] third were ready.  In these shall we dwell, said the Lords of the Flame . . .” — SD 2:161
See later on concerning the beginning of human speech.
see: “The Fourth Race Developed Speech,” SD 2:198-9.
the Monera of Hæckel
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “First stage. — Monera.  Organisms of the simplest structure conceivable . . . The earliest Monera, from which later on the first cells evolved, can only have arisen by evolution from inorganic matter.” — pp. 75-6
the Sarisripa of Manu
see: Ordinances of Manu, tr. Burnell, ed. Hopkins, 1884: “He (Brahmā) . . . created time . . . the five (elements) . . . the ten lords of beings . . . men, beasts of prey . . . insects, lice, flies, and bugs . . . snakes, crocodiles . . . and likewise all other kinds (of reptiles . . .) . . .” — pp. 5-7 (i.23, 24, 27, 34, 39, 40, 44)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Brahmā . . . created; in the commencement of the Kalpa, various plants . . . Animals were distinguished into two classes . . . The fifth order were the birds; the sixth, aquatic animals; and the seventh, reptiles and insects {sarīsṛipa}.” — 1:84 & fn.
the “human” Monad . . . immetallized . . . invegetallized . . . or inanimalized . . .
see: The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett, comp. A. T. Barker, 1926: “A Round . . . [is] the passage of a monad . . . through the encasement in all and each of the four kingdoms, viz., as a mineral, a vegetable, an animal and man . . . The monad performs . . . seven major inmetalliations, inherbations, zoonisations (?) and incarnations . . .” — pp. 80-1 (Letter XIV, Received by A.O.H., July 9, 1882)

— 186 —

The Monad . . . is divine in its higher and human in its lower condition
see: H. P. Blavatsky, “Theories About Reincarnation and Spirits,” Nov. 1886: “The immortal Spirit . . . [is] an emanation from the One . . . Its Vehicle — the divine Soul — called the ‘Immortal Ego,’ the ‘Divine monad’ . . . What is the false personality?  It is that bundle of desires, aspirations, affection and hatred . . . manifested by a human being on this earth during one incarnation and under the form of one personality.” — pp. 238-9 (The Path, v. 1)
the manifested Universe reflects itself in each of its Monads
see: C. H. A. Bjerregaard, “The Elementals, The Elementary Spirits,” Jan. 1887: “Every monad reflects every other.  Every monad is a living mirror of the universe, within its own sphere.”  “Leibnitz has seen as distinctly as the old nature worshippers of the early Aryans, that ‘every monad represents the entire universe.’ ” — pp. 297, 299 (The Path, v. 1)
Man becomes a stone, a plant, an animal, a man, a Spirit, and finally God . . .”
see: Henry Morely, The Life of Henry Cornelius Agrippa, 1856: “These sephiroth . . . are also sometimes arranged in the form of a man, Adam Kadmon [heavenly Man] . . . God, it was said, is all in all; everything is part of the divine essence, with a growing, or perceptive, or reflective power . . . A stone may become a plant; a plant, a beast; a beast, a man; a man, an angel; and angel, a creator.” — 1:76
these stones, plants, and animals were the prototypes . . .
see: A. P. Sinnett, Esoteric Buddhism, 1885: “Behind the human harvest of the life impulse, there lay the harvest of mere animal forms . . .”  “. . . the main purpose in view was to elucidate the way in which the human entity was gradually evolved from processes of Nature going on in the first instance in lower kingdoms.”  “The vegetable establishes organic matter in physical manifestation, and prepares the way for the higher evolution of the animal kingdom.” — pp. 46, 52-3
“Produced from the residue of the substance . . .”
see: Stanza VIII, 28: “. . . from the residue of the substance; matter from dead bodies and animals of the wheel before . . .” — SD 2:180

— 187 —

“The history of the embryo is an epitome of that of the race.”
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “The fundamental biogenetic law must therefore now be more rigidly formulated, as follows: ‘The history of the embryo is an epitome of that of the race.’ ” — p. 271
“every organism, in its development from the egg . . .”
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “. . . every organism, in its development from the egg, runs through a series of forms, through which, in like succession, its ancestors have passed in the long course of earth’s history.  The history of the embryo, therefore, is a picture in little an outline of that of the race.  This conception forms the gist of our fundamental biogenetic law, which we are obliged to place at the head of the study of development, as the veritable fundamental law of organic development.” — p. 270 (“The Proofs of Evolution”)
Any anatomist who has made . . . the embryo “a subject of special study” . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Any anatomist who has made the development and growth of the embryo and fœtus ‘a subject of special study,’ can tell, without much brain-work, what daily experience and the evidence of his own eyes show him, viz.: that up to a certain period, the human embryo is a fac-simile of a young batrachian in its first remove from the spawn — a tadpole.” — 1:388

— Footnotes

“A very strong argument in favour of variability . . .”
p/q: André Lefèvre, Philosophy, Historical and Critical, 1879: “A very strong argument in favour of variability is supplied by the science of embryology.  Is not man in the uterus . . . a simple cell, a vegetable with three or four leaflets, a tadpole with branchiæ, a mammal with a tail, lastly, a primate and biped?  It is scarcely possible not to recognize in the embryonic evolution a rapid sketch, a faithful summary, of the entire organic series.” — p. 484

— 187-8 —

But no physiologist or anatomist seems to have had the idea . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “But no physiologist or anatomist seems to have had the idea of applying to the development of the human being — from the first instant of its physical appearance as a germ to its ultimate formation and birth — the Pythagorean esoteric doctrine of metempsychosis, so erroneously interpreted by critics.  The meaning of the kabalistic axiom: ‘A stone becomes a plant; a plant a beast; a beast a man, etc.,’ was mentioned in another place in relation to the spiritual and physical evolution of man on this earth.  We will now add a few words more to make the idea clearer.” — 1:388

— 188 —

What is the primitive shape of the future man?  A grain, a corpuscle . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “What is the primitive shape of the future man?  A grain, a corpuscle, say some physiologists; a molecule, an ovum of the ovum, say others.  If it could be analyzed — by the spectroscope or otherwise — of what ought we to expect to find it composed?  Analogically, we should say, of a nucleus or inorganic matter, deposited from the circulation at the germinating point, and united with a deposit of organic matter.  In other words, this infinitesimal nucleus of the future man is composed of the same elements as a stone — of the same elements as the earth, which the man is destined to inhabit.  Moses is cited by the kabalists as authority for the remark, that it required earth and water to make a living being, and thus it may be said that man first appears as a stone.” — 1:388-9
At the end of three or four weeks the ovum has assumed . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “At the end of three or four weeks the ovum has assumed a plant-like appearance, one extremity having become spheroidal and the other tapering, like a carrot.  Upon dissection it is found to be composed, like an onion, of very delicate laminæ or coats, enclosing a liquid.  The laminæ approach each other at the lower end, and the embryo hangs from the root of the umbilicus almost like a fruit from the bough.  The stone has now become changed, by metempsychosis, into a plant.  Then the embryonic creature begins to shoot out, from the inside outward, its limbs, and develops its features.” — 1:389
The eyes are visible as two black dots . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The eyes are visible as two black dots; the ears, nose, and mouth form depressions, like the points of a pineapple, before they begin to project.  The embryo develops into an animal-like fœtus — the shape of a tadpole — and like an amphibious reptile lives in water, and develops from it.  Its monad has not yet become either human or immortal, for the kabalists tell us that that only comes at the ‘fourth hour.’  One by one the fœtus assumes the characteristics of the human being, the first flutter of the immortal breath passes through his being; he moves; nature opens the way for him; ushers him into the world; and the divine essence settles in the infant frame, which it will inhabit until the moment of physical death, when man becomes a spirit.” — 1:389
The mysterious process of a nine-months’ formation . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “This mysterious process of a nine-months formation the kabablists call the completion of the ‘individual cycle of evolution.’  As the fœtus develops from the liquor amnii in the womb, so the earths germinate from the universal ether, or astral fluid, in the womb of the universe.” — 1:389

— 188-9 —

These cosmic children, like their pigmy inhabitants, are at first nuclei . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “These cosmic children, like their pigmy inhabitants, are first nuclei; then ovules; then gradually mature; and becoming mothers in their turn, develop mineral, vegetable, animal, and human forms.  From centre to circumference, from the imperceptible vesicle to the uttermost conceivable bounds of the cosmos, these glorious thinkers, the kabalists, trace cycle merging into cycle, containing and contained in an endless series.  The embryo evolving in its pre-natal sphere, the individual in his family, the family in the state, the state in mankind, the earth in our system, that system in its central universe, the universe in the cosmos, and the cosmos in the First Cause . . . So runs their philosophy of evolution . . .” — 1:389-90

— 189 —

“All are but parts of one stupendous whole . . .”
p/q: Alexander Pope, Essay on Man, 1881:
“All are but parts of one stupendous whole,
  Whose body nature is, and God the soul . . .” — p. 36 (First Epistle, 267-8)
(. . . “originated in the course of immeasurable ages . . .”)
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, tr. E. B. Aveling, 1883: “. . . all these different species have evolved from a few, perhaps from one original primordial form . . . They have all originated in the course of immeasurable ages from a few or from one simple spontaneously-arising original form that has obeyed one law of Evolution . . .” — p. 9
no “missing links” . . . have ever yet been found
see: S. R. Pattison & Friedrich Pfaff, The Age and Origin of Man, 1883: “Nowhere, in the older deposits, is an ape to be found that approximates more closely to man, or a man that approximates more closely to an ape . . .” — p. 51 (“The Origin of Man” by Pfaff)

— 190 —

“All things had their origin in spirit . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “. . . all things had their origin in spirit — evolution having originally begun from above and proceeded downward, instead of the reverse, as taught in the Darwinian theory.  In other words, there has been a gradual materialization of forms until a fixed ultimate of debasement is reached.  This point is that at which the doctrine of modern evolution enters into the arena of speculative hypothesis.  Arrived at this period we will find it easier to understand Haeckel’s Anthropogeny, which traces the pedigree of man ‘from its protoplasmic root, sodden in the mud of seas which existed before the oldest of the fossiliferous rocks were deposited,’ according to Professor Huxley’s exposition.” — 1:154
“We may believe the man . . . evolved ‘by gradual modification . . .’ ”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “We may believe man evolved ‘by gradual modification of a mammal of ape-like organization’ still easier when we remember that (though in a more condensed and less elegant, but still comprehensible, phraseology) the same theory was said by Berosus to have been taught many thousands of years before his time by the man-fish Oannes or Dagon, the semi-demon of Babylonia.” — 1:154
“the man-fish Oannes . . . the semi-demon of Babylonia”
see: Ancient Fragments, comp. Isaac Preston Cory, 1832: “. . . there appeared, from that part of the Erythræan sea which borders upon Babylonia, an animal destitute of reason, by name Oannes, whose whole body . . . was that of a fish . . .” — p. 22 (“Fragments of Chaldæan History, Berossus”)
“But what lies back of the Darwinian line of descent? . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “But what lies back of the Darwinian line of descent?  So far as he is concerned nothing but ‘unverifiable hypotheses.’  For, as he puts it, he views all beings ‘as the lineal descendants of some few beings which lived long before the first bed of the Silurian system was deposited.’ ” — 1:154
p/q: Charles Darwin, On the Origin of Species, 1864: “. . . I view all beings not as special creations, but as the lineal descendants of some few beings which lived long before the first bed of the Silurian system was deposited . . .” — p. 424
“He does not attempt to show us who these ‘few beings’ were. . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “He does not attempt to show us who these ‘few beings’ were.  But it answers our purpose quite as well, for in the admission of their existence at all, resort to the ancients for corroboration and elaboration of the idea receives the stamp of scientific approbation.” — 1:154
“If we accept Darwin’s theory of the development of species . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “If we accept Darwin’s theory of the development of species, we find that his starting-point is placed in front of an open door.  We are at liberty with him, to either remain within, or cross the threshold, beyond which lies the limitless and the incomprehensible, or rather the Unutterable.  If our mortal language is inadequate to express what our spirit dimly foresees in the great ‘Beyond’ — while on this earth — it must realize it as some point in the timeless Eternity.” — 1:14-15
Bathybius Hæckelii
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “. . . the first appearance of living beings, can only be decided empirically by proof of the so-called Archeobiosis . . . the spontaneous production of organisms of the simplest conceivable kind. . . . Such a Moneron as that primordial organism discovered by the renowned English zoologist Huxley and named Bathybius Haeckelii . . .” — p. 33

— 191 —

the sin of the mindless
see: “Darwinism and the Antiquity of Man: The Anthropoids and their Ancestry”: “. . . the bestiality of the primeval mindless races resulted in the production of huge man-like monsters — the offspring of human and animal parents. . . . the descendants of these creatures were modified by external conditions, until the breed, dwindling in size, culminated in the lower apes of the Miocene period.” — SD 2:689
“the wise guard the home of nature’s order . . .”
p/q: H. W. Wallis, Cosmology of the Ṛigveda, 1887: “The wise (the rays . . .) guard the home of nature’s order, they assume excellent forms in secret.” — p. 48 (Ṛigveda, X. 5. 2)

— Footnotes

“The seven wise ones . . . fashion seven paths (or lines . . .).  To one of these . . .”
p/q: H. W. Wallis, Cosmology of the Ṛigveda, 1887: “The (seven) wise ones (rays) fashion seven lines, to one of these may the distressed mortal come.” — p. 49 (Ṛigveda, X. 5. 6)
lines (maryadah) . . . are primarily beams of light . . .
see: H. W. Wallis, Cosmology of the Ṛigveda, 1887: “The ‘lines’ maryādāḥ are the beams of light; the word occurs again in IV. 5. 13. . . . These beams diverge as paths from the point where the sun stands . . .” — p. 49 fn.

— 192 —

Daksha (the reincarnated Creator of men and things . . .)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the eminent patriarch Daksha . . . had (in a former life) been born as the son of Brahmā.  This great sage, for the furtherance of creation, and the increase of mankind, created progeny. . . . he made movable and immovable things . . .”  “Daksha and the other eminent Munis are present in every age, and, in the interval of destruction, cease to be.” — 2:9-10, 11 (i.15)

— Footnotes

Rudra, as a Kumâra, is . . . red and blue
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The appearance of Rudra as a Kumāra, ‘a boy’, is described . . . these Kumāras are of different complexions in different Kalpas.  In the Vaishṇava Purāṇas . . . the name of Nilalohita, ‘the blue and red or purple complexioned’, is assigned.” — 1:115 fn. (i.8)

— 193 —

Homo primigenius
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “For in that long chain of many generations that formed the transition from the men-apes to the ape-men . . . no single pair can be designated as ‘the first pair of human beings.’ . . . Let us, for the time being, call this hypothetical species Homo primigenius.” — p. 80
The real anthropoids, Hæckel’s Catarrhini and Platyrrhini . . .
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “The division of the true apes or Simiæ is to-day arranged in two sub-orders, the Platyrrhini and Catarrhini.  The group Platyrrhini includes all the apes of the new world (America), amongst others the howlers . . . capuchins, and squirrel-monkeys.  The group Catarrhini . . . includes all the apes of the old world (Asia and Africa).  To it belong the tailed baboons, the macaques, and . . . the tailless anthropoid apes . . .” — pp. 71-2
the old Jewish fable of the rib of Adam yielding Eve
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam . . . and he took one of his ribs . . . and the rib, which the Lord God had taken from man, made he a woman . . .”— p. 3 (Genesis, 2:21-2)
Quadrumana
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “The older naturalists divided the class Mammalia into a series of some ten to fifteen different orders.  This series began with the order Cetacea [whales, dolphins, porpoises], which seemed to claim the lowest rank by the fish-like shape of its body.  It ended with the order of the apes, the Quadrumana that approached most nearly to the human form.  From these . . . the human race was separated, as the order Bimana.” — p. 64

— Footnotes

“The primitive human form, whence as we think all human species sprang . . .”
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “The primitive human form, whence, as we think, all human species sprang, has perished this long time.  But many facts point to the conclusion that it was hairy, dolichocephalic . . . Let us, for the time being, call this hypothetical species Homo primigenius. . . . The first species, Homo primigenius, or the ape-man, the ancestor of all the others, probably arose in the tropical regions of the old world from anthropoid apes.” — p. 80
“Of these no fossil remains are as yet known to us . . .”
p/q: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “Of these no fossil remains are as yet known to us, but they were probably akin to the gorilla and orang of the present day.” — p. 80
And then the Papuan negro is mentioned . . .
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “. . . the Papuan Negro mentioned next are, among living races, the nearest to Homo primigenius.” — p. 80
Hæckel holds fast to Lemuria, which with East Africa and South Asia also . . .
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Pedigree of Man, 1883: “It would seem that the region on the earth’s surface where the evolution of these primitive men . . . took place must be sought either in Southern Asia or Eastern Africa, or in Lemuria.  Lemuria is an ancient continent now sunk beneath the waters of the Indian Ocean . . .” — p. 80
Wallace admits its reality . . . in his “Geographical Distribution of Animals
see: Alfred Russel Wallace, The Geographical Distribution of Animals, 1876: “. . . Lemuria, a name proposed by Mr. Sclater for the site of a supposed submerged continent extending from Madagascar to Ceylon and Sumatra, in which the Lemuroid type of animals was developed.  This is undoubtedly a legitimate and highly probable supposition, and it is an example of the way in which a study of the geographical distribution of animals may enable us to reconstruct the geography of a bygone age.” — 1:76
the highest of the Apes, the gorilla, has a brain of only 30 . . . cubic inches . . .
p/q: Pattison & Pfaff, The Age and Origin of Man, 1883: “According to M. Vogt, the greatest of all apes, the gorilla, has a brain of 30.51 cubic inches; while the medium size, in the case of the largest brains of the Australian natives . . . amounts to 99.35 cubic inches.” — p. 52 (“The Age of Man” by Pattison)
The former is thus “not half the size of the brain of a new-born babe”
p/q: Friedrich Pfaff, Das Alter und der Ursprung des Menschengeschlechts, 1876: “Das Gehirn der menschenähnlichsten Affen . . . erreicht nicht einmal die hälfte von dem eines neugebornen Kindes [The brain of the apes most like man . . . reaches not even half that of a newborn child].” — p. 37

— 193-4 —

A Tahitian tradition . . . man was created out of Aræa, “red Earth.”
see: F. Max Müller, Introduction to the Science of Religion, 1873: “ ‘A very generally received Tahitian tradition is that the first human pair were made by Taaroa, the principal deity . . . he created man out of araea, red earth . . .’ ” — pp. 302-3 (William Ellis, Polynesian Researches, vol. ii, p. 38)

— 194 —

Taaroa . . . pulled an Ivi (bone) out of man and she became a woman.
see: F. Max Müller, Introduction to the Science of Religion, 1873: “ ‘. . . Taaroa one day called for the man by name.  When he came, he caused him to fall asleep, that, while he slept, he took out one of his ivi, or bones, and with it made a woman, whom he gave to the man as his wife, and they became the progenitors of mankind.’ ” — p. 303 (William Ellis, Polynesian Researches, vol. ii, p. 38)
“The supernatural has become like the original sin . . .”
p/q: J. E. Renan, La Chaire d’Hébreu au Collège de France, 1862: “Le surnaturel est devenu comme une tache originelle dont on a honte; les personnes, même les plus religieuses, n’en veulent plus qu’un minimum; on cherche à faire sa part aussi petite que possible; on le cache dans les recoins du passé [The supernatural has become like an original sin of which we are ashamed; people, even the most religious ones, do not want more than a minimum of it; we seek to make its part as small as possible; we hide it in the furthest corners of the past].” — p. 29

— Footnotes

Missionaries . . . pounced upon this name Ivi and made of it Eve.
see: F. Max Müller, Introduction to the Science of Religion, 1873: “Some have also stated that the woman’s name was Ivi, which would be by them pronounced as if written Eve.” — p. 303
Eve is . . . an European transformation of . . . chavah
see: F. Max Müller, Introduction to the Science of Religion, 1873: “. . . the English corruption of the Hebrew . . . Chāvah [Ḥavvāh], Eve . . .” — p. 304
chavah, “life,” or mother of all living
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And Adam called his wife’s name Eve {Havvah, that is, Living, or, Life}; because she was the mother of all living.” — p. 4 & fn. (Genesis, 3:20)
“while the Tahitian Ivi and the Maori Wheva meant bone and bone only”
p/q: F. Max Müller, Introduction to the Science of Religion, 1873: “Whatever Chāvah meant in Hebrew, whether life or living . . . it never meant bone, while the Tahitian ivi, the Maori wheva, meant bone, and bone only.” — p. 304 (“On False Analogies in Comparative Theology”)

— 195 —

“There is no question of selection between human races” . . .
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “. . . between human races there can be no question of selection.  The unions have always taken place by chance. . . . This absence of uniformity, which astonishes polygenists, is easily explained by those who only consider human groups as races.  From a general point of view it is very instructive; if it brings forward diversity of races, it attests specific unity.” — p. 267
de Quatrefages and other naturalists, who seek to prove Monogenesis
see: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “. . . the Monogenists consider . . . that there is but one species of man which is divided into several races, all of which are derived from a common stock.”  “. . . monogenism reckons among its partisans nearly all those naturalists who have turned their attention to the phenomena of life . . . Buffon and Linnæus, Cuvier and Lamarck, Blainville and the two Geoffroys, Müller the physiologist and Humboldt agree on this point.” — pp. 30, 32

— 196 —

a case of a Tasmanian tribe . . .
see: Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, 1876: “When Tasmania was first colonised the natives were roughly estimated by some at 7000 and by others at 20,000.  Their number was soon greatly reduced, chiefly by fighting with the English and with each other.  After the famous hunt by all the colonists, when the remaining natives delivered themselves up to the government they consisted only of 120 individuals, who were in 1832 transported to Flinders Island. . . . the natives were well-treated.  Nevertheless, they suffered greatly in health.”  “The infertility of the women is even a more remarkable fact . . . ‘This may have been in a great measure owing to their change of living and food; but more so to their banishment from the mainland . . . and consequent depression of spirits’ . . .” — pp. 183, 184
the Australian native — co-existing . . . with an archaic fauna and flora . . .
see: “The First Metallurgists,” Jan. 1875: “. . . it is almost universally acknowledged by geologists that Australia is the oldest land existing on the face of the globe, its peculiar fauna and flora connecting it with a geologic age long since superseded in other parts of the world by more modern forms. . . . we find there, co-existent with this flora and fauna . . . mankind, resembling that which researches among our caves reveal as having existed here, together with extinct animals . . .” — p. 67 (Westminster Review, v. 103)
“It is a very curious fact . . . that only these marsupial animals . . .”
p/q: J. B. Jukes, The School Manual of Geology, 1863: “It is a very curious fact that not only these marsupial animals but several of the shells — as for instance the Trigonias and even some of the plants, found fossil in the Oolitic rocks — much more nearly resemble those now living in Australia, than the living forms of any other part of the globe.” — p. 271

— Footnotes

The Australians of the Gulf of St. Vincent . . .”
p/q: Oscar Schmidt, The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism, 1875: “. . . the natives of the Gulf of St. Vincent and the neighbourhood of Adelaide are extremely hairy, and . . . the brown-coloured down of the children is so abundant . . . that the skin of boys of five or six years of age assumes a furry appearance.” — p. 301
They are . . . not the closest approximation to the “pithecoid man” . . .
see: Ernst Haeckel, The Evolution of Man, 1886: “. . . Stages in the Animal Ancestral Line of Man. . . . Nearest Living Relatives . . . Quaternary Epoch . . . Australians and Papuans.” — 2:44
       “Although Man (Homo) ranks immediately next to this anthropoid family, from which he doubtless directly originated, yet the Ape-men (Pithecanathropi) may be inserted here, as an important intermediate form between the two . . .” — 2:181
Only a portion of these men are a Lemurian relic.
see: A. P. Sinnett, Esoteric Buddhism, 1885: “ ‘. . . Lemuria flourishing and ending her career just . . . before the early part of the Eocene age, since its race was the third.  Behold the relics of that once great nation in some of the . . . aborigines of your Australia.’ ” — p. 65 (Letter by K.H. [XXIII B in The Mahatma Letters])

— 196-7 —

“This might be explained on the supposition that . . .”
p/q: J. B. Jukes, The School Manual of Geology, 1863: “This might be explained on the supposition that since the Oolitic period less change had taken place in Australia than elsewhere, and that the Australian Fauna and Flora consequently retained something of the Oolitic type, while it had been altogether supplanted and replaced in the rest of the globe.” — p. 271

— 197 —

it became bisexual or androgynous; very gradually of course
see: H. P. Blavatsky, “Notes sur l’Esotérisme du Dogme Chrétien,” Dec. 1887: “. . . ce sont les races, à peine consolidées d’abord, de nos prototypes androgynes et semi-éthérées se matérialisant peu à peu, prenant un corps physique, puis se scindant en mâles et femelles distincts [these are the races, at first barely solidified, of our androgynous and semi-ethereal prototypes, materializing themselves little by little, taking on a physical body, then dividing themselves into distinct males and females] . . .” — p. 169 (Le Lotus)

— Footnotes

The “fables” and “myths” about Leda and Jupiter
see: J. Lemprière, Bibliotheca Classica, 1833: “Jupiter, who was enamoured of Leda, changed himself into a beautiful swan . . . Jupiter took advantage of his situation, and nine months after, Leda, who was already pregnant, brought forth two eggs, from one of which came Pollux and Helena, and from the other, Castor and Clytemnestra.” — 1:332

— 198 —

the approximate figures . . . in Stanza II
see: Stanza II, “The Chronology of the Brahmins,” SD 2:68-70.
The Fourth Race Developed Speech
see: H. P. Blavatsky, “Occult or Exact Science?” April 1886: “. . . the Esoteric Doctrine . . . on the Evolution of Races, in which primitive man is shown . . . developing a sense in each successive sub-race . . . Human speech, as known to us, came into being in the Root-race that preceded ours — the Fourth or the ‘Atlantean’ — at the very beginning of it . . .” — p. 430 (The Theosophist, v. 7)
The whole human race was . . . of “one language and of one lip”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And the whole earth was of one language {Heb. lip} and of one speech.” — p. 12 & fn. (Genesis, 11:1)
four ages — the Golden, Silver, Bronze, and Iron Age
see: Monier Williams, Indian Wisdom, 1875: “The Hindū idea of a succession of four Yugas or ages [Kṛita, Tretā, Dvāpara, Kali], in which a gradual deterioration of the human race takes place, has its counterpart among the Romans in the Golden, Silver, Brazen, and Iron ages, as described in Ovid’s Metamorphoses (I. 89 &c.).” — p. 333 fn.

— Footnotes

In the section on the Divine Dynasties, the nature of these “Instructors” is explained.
see: “Our Divine Instructors,” SD 2:365-78.
Vide Section attached to the “Division into Yugas.”
see: “The Chronology of the Brahmins,” SD 2:66-74.

— 199 —

the agglutinative . . . aboriginal tribes of America
see: The Bible of Every Land, 1848: “. . . aboriginal tribes of America. . . . the languages of that vast continent . . . are distinguished by certain peculiarities of internal mechanism . . . [it] is their tendency to compress the words which are syntactically or logically connected together in a sentence into one single word.  This . . . is familiarly called ‘agglutination’ . . .” — p. 360

— Footnotes

“Thought and language are identical.”
see: F. Max Müller, The Science of Thought, 1887: “. . . language is thought and thought is language . . .”  “Now, if our first tenet is right, if language and reason are identical . . . there was a time when the first stone of the great temple of language was laid, and that before that time man was without language, and therefore without reason.” — 1:80, 83
Logos is both reason and speech.
see: F. Max Müller, Lectures on the Science of Language, 1873: “. . . what the Greek called lógos, i.e. reason . . . expresses in Greek both speech and reason.” — 2:66
the Greek Logos is the equivalent of the Sancrit Vâch
see: François Lenormant, Manual of the History of the East, 1870: “. . . Vach (the Latin Vox), the sacred ‘speech,’ the ‘Word’ {The Logos of the Greek and later Hebrew philosophy} . . .” — 2:15 & fn.
“the immortal (intellectual) ray of spirit”
see: F. Max Müller, Theosophy or Psychological Religion, 1893: “The Logos, the Word, as the thought of God, as the whole body of divine or eternal ideas . . . is a truth that forms . . . the foundation of all philosophy.”  “Thus Henry More says:
‘I came from God, am an immortal ray
Of God . . . and back to God shall go.’ ” — pp. 521, 541 (Lecture XV)
Vâch (as Devasena, an aspect of Saraswati . . .)
see: Original Sanskrit Texts, tr. J. Muir, 1868-73: “Indra . . . hears the cry of a female calling for help . . . her name is Devasenā (army of the gods) . . .” — 4:350
see: Stanza IV, 4: “The ‘Army of the Voice,’ is the prototype of the ‘Host of the Logos’ . . . the Voice, the feminine Vāch, Satarupa ‘of the hundred forms’ . . .” — SD 1:94
see: W. J. Wilkins, Hindu Mythology, 1882: “ ‘Sarasvati was indentified with Vāch . . . she is said to be the wife of Indra, to contain within herself all worlds . . .’ ” — pp. 93-4
(. . . Saraswati, the goddess of hidden Wisdom)
see: S. F. Dunlap, The Ghebers of Hebron, 1894: “Sara-isuati (Sarasvati) is the Primal Wisdom.  As Vach (Vox, Word, Logos, Minerva) she is . . . omnipresent and pervader of all beings.” — p. 28 fn.
the spouse of the eternal celibate Kumâra
see: Monier Williams, A Sanskrit-English Dictionary, 1872: “kaumara . . . virgin . . . relating to the god of war or Sanat-kumāra [‘eternal virgin’] . . . the energy or śakti of Kumāra or Kārttikeya the god of war . . .” — pp. 257-8
the Kumâras, those “who refused to create”
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The Kaumāra creation . . . Sanatkumāra, Sananda, Sanaka, and Sanātana . . . These, declining to create progeny, remained, as the name of the first implies, ever boys, Kumāras . . .” — 1:77 fn.

— 200 —

Sanskrit, very erroneously called “the elder sister” of the Greeks
p/q: F. Max Müller, Lectures on the Science of Language, 1873: “Sanskrit, Greek, and Latin are sisters, varieties of one and the same type. . . . All we can say in favour of Sanskrit is, that it is the elder sister . . .” — 2:449
a tribe descended from the Tchandalas of India . . . some 8,000 years B.C.
see: H. V. P. Bronkhurst, The Colony of British Guyana, 1883: “. . . Tchandalas . . . this class was composed of individuals who had lost caste . . . some eight thousand years before our era . . . King Pratichta issued an edict or Karana against them, by which they were forbidden to practise the religion of Brahman . . . and about b.c. 4000 they had become a nomadic race . . . they emigrated, according to Hindu authorities . . . in the direction of the Euphrates and Tigris . . . It was thus, therefore, that the primitive wanderers emerged from the Holy Land of Palestine . . .” — pp. 3-4 (“Some Interesting Notes About Ancient India”)
the Tchandalas . . . sought refuge in Chaldea, in Scinde, and Aria
see: H. V. P. Bronkhurst, The Colony of British Guyana, 1883: “Between 3000 and 4000 b.c. they emigrated . . . towards the West in crowds, entering the countries of Scindh and Arya, in the direction of . . . Babylon and Chaldea . . .” — p. 4 (“Some Interesting Notes About Ancient India”)
ex-Brahmins . . . born from their father A-bram
see: Godfrey Higgins, Anacalypsis, 1836: “. . . Abraham came from India or Persia.  It is very possible that the tribe might originally have come from India and have resided a long time in Persia . . . Thus, when the Israelitish tribe, who were a sect of Brahmins, came into Syria, they would merely say that Abram came.” — 1:390
the Arabs, are the descendants of those Aryans
see: Mountstuart Elphinstone, An Account of the Kingdom of Caubul, 1815: “. . . all their histories of their nation begin with relating the transactions of the Jews from Abraham down to the captivity. . . . After the captivity, they allege that part of the children of Afghaun withdrew to the mountains of Ghore, and part to the neighbourhood of Mecca in Arabia.” — p. 155
those Aryans who . . . remained on the borderlands . . . in Afghanistan
see: Charles Forster, One Primeval Language, 1854: “These verifications may give some just idea of the real antiquity of the Afghán settlements in the mountains of Ghore . . . Ghore, would appear to be merely the Arabic term for a border country, or a district surrounded and shut-in by mountains.” — 3:267

— Footnotes

Ptolemy . . . in his ninth table . . . calls them Αριστόφυλοι . . . noble tribes.
see: Charles Forster, One Primeval Language, 1854: “. . . one Ptolemaic name of a people . . . [in] Ptolemy’s Ninth Table . . . The name was ριστόφυλοι, Aristophyli, ‘The Noble Tribes.’ . . . Ptolemy disposes of his Aristophyli in juxtaposition with his Kabolitæ. . . . the ancient Kabolitæ are, literally, ‘The Tribes,’ and the modern Kabul, and Kabulistan, the city and country of ‘The Tribes.’ ” — 3:283-4
The Afghans call themselves Ben-Issrael . . .
see: Charles Forster, One Primeval Language, 1854: “. . . glance merely at a few leading points, the fact of their own universal tradition, their calling themselves, collectively, ‘Bin Israel,’ Children of Israel (though they repudiate with indignation the name of ‘Yahoudi,’ or Jew) . . .” — 3:241
to find such tribal names . . . as Youssoufzic . . . in Punjacaure and Boonere
see: Charles Forster, One Primeval Language, 1854: “. . . we come now . . . to the Afghan tribe denominated You-soph-zie, or The Tribe of Joseph.”  “The name of the great Afghàn tribe of Eusof, or Eusof-zie, ‘the tribe of Joseph,’ is, in point of fact, the same with . . . The tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh.”  “ ‘The Eusofzyes . . . possess the extensive country . . . composed of the northern part of the plain of Peshawer, and the valleys of Punjcora, Swaut, and Boonere.’ ” — 3:273-5, 279
the Zablistanee (Zebulon)
see: Charles Forster, One Primeval Language, 1854: “. . . the territorial appellative Zablestan, may legitimately be rendered, ‘The land of Zebulon.’ . . . its inhabitants, like all the Afgháns, claim to be a portion of the lost Ten Tribes, calling themselves Beni-Israeel . . .” — 3:282
(sons of Manasseh) among the Khojar Tartars
see: Charles Forster, One Primeval Language, 1854: “. . . I passed forthwith to . . . the country of the Chozars, in the neighbourhood of the Caspian, in quest of possible traces of the lost Tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh.  When almost the first name that met my eye, was that of Tos-Manassa . . . ‘The far-banished Manasseh.’ . . . we are here walking in the foot-marks of a known Hebrew population: the Jewish, or Israelitish portion of the Chozar Tartars.” — 3:317-18
Isaguri, or Issachar (now Ashnagor in Afghanistan)
see: Charles Forster, One Primeval Language, 1854: “. . . it was in Eastern Tartary, on the confines of China, that my geographical research was rewarded . . . Here, so far as the nomenclature was concerned, unquestionably stood revealed the lost Tribe of Issachar . . . The Isaguri were there seated, in the age of Ptolemy . . . we descend, with Ptolemy, southward . . . and find the name of Issachar re-appear on the Indus, in his city of Isagurus, and this city (now Ashnagor) seated in the country of the great Afghàn Tribe of Eusof-zye, or ‘Tribe of Joseph’ . . .” — 3:319-20
names of the . . . twelve tribes are names of the signs of the Zodiac
see: G. Townsend, Œdipus Romanus, 1819: “Though Sir William Drummond’s professed object is to prove only that the standards of the twelve tribes were taken from the Zodiacal signs . . . his arguments undoubtedly identify the Patriarchs themselves, with these signs.” — p. 27
Ptolemy Philadelphus . . . See Butler’s “Horæ Biblicæ,” Josephus, and Philo Judæus.
see: The Book of God [by E. V. H. Kenealy], 1867: “The account which we have received from Josephus and Philo, of the Septuagint version is . . . unsatisfactory . . . and Butler, in his Horæ Biblicæ treats it as an exploded fable. . . . the whole may be summarized thus.  Ptolemy Philadelphus, King of Egypt, hearing from his librarian an account of the Hebrew Law which moved his curiosity, wrote to Eleazar, the high priest of the Jews, to send him six men from each of the twelve tribes, who should translate the Law for him into Greek. . . . and by these seventy-two the Greek version was made.” — pp. 415-16

— 201 —

Till then, there was no sin . . . the Satya (Yuga) . . .”
see: Thomas Maurice, History of Hindostan, 1795: “. . . by the satya age, or age of perfection, the Brahmins obscurely allude to . . . the universal purity of manners . . . prevailing in that primitive æra . . . Justice, truth, philanthropy, were then practised among all the orders and classes of mankind . . .” — 1:371
The eternal spring . . .”
see: Thomas Maurice, History of Hindostan, 1795: “. . . read the beautiful descriptions in Hesiod and Ovid of the happiness, virtue, and abundance which reigned in that age, when the earth spontaneously, and without the least labour of man, brought forth her richest productions, when an eternal spring reigned {Hesiod, lib. I. v. 101, and Ovid. Met. I. 3.} . . .” — 1:375-6 & fn.
Divine Kings descended and taught men sciences and arts
see: Karl Blind, “Water Tales,” Sept. 1881: “At a time when Babylonia, according to Berosos, was inhabited by an incongruous mass of races, a strange miraculous figure was said to have risen from the Red Sea, half fish, half man; called Oannes, or Oann.  It had human voice, and taught men how to write, as well as all sciences and arts . . .”  “Seven times . . . such Fish-beings arose in the course of years from the Red Sea, bringing revelations and confirming what Oann had taught.” — pp. 421-2 (Contemporary Review, v. 40)
the first land (Adi-Varsha, the Eden of the first Races)”
see: François Lenormant, “Ararat and ’Eden,” Sept. 1881: “. . . we might even say the perfect identity, of all the essential features of the typical description of Mount Meru in the Purānas with the topography of ’Êden in the second chapter of Genesis.  The garden of ’Êden . . . is placed, like the garden of delight of the gods of India, on the summit of a mountain . . . The names of Ilā-varsha and Ilā-vrita . . . give to this mountain the character of an earthly paradise, whence mankind derived their origin . . . the earthly paradise — in which the first human generations passed their days of innocence . . .” — pp. 470-1 (Contemporary Review, v. 40)

— 202 —

“The Garden of Eden as a locality is no myth . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “. . . the garden of Eden as a locality is no myth at all; it belongs to those landmarks of history which occasionally disclose to the student that the Bible is not all mere allegory.  ‘Eden, or the Hebrew גן־עדן gan-eden, meaning the park or the garden of Eden, is an archaic name of the country watered by the Euphrates and its many branches, from Asia and Armenia to the Erythraian Sea.’ ” — 1:575
(A. Wilder says that Gan-duniyas is a name of Babylonia.)
see: H. Clarke & C. S. Wake, Serpent and Śiva Worship, ed. A. Wilder, 1877: “. . . the region of Duni, at the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates, called in the Assyrian tablets Kar-duniyas or Gan-duniyas.  This latter name is the same as GaN-EDeN, the garden of God; and, indeed, Sir Henry Rawlinson has pointed out the argreement of the Babylonian region of Kar-duniyas with the Eden of the Bible.” — p. ix (“Introduction” by Wilder)
In the Chaldean “Book of Numbers,” the location is . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “In the Chaldean Book of Numbers, its location is designated in numerals, and in the cipher Rosicrucian manuscript, left by Count St. Germain, it is fully described.  In the Assyrian Tablets, it is rendered gan-dunyas.  ‘Behold,’ say the אלהים Eloim of Genesis [3:22], ‘the man is become as one of us.’  The Eloim may be accepted in one sense for gods or powers, and taken in another one for the Aleim, or priests; the hierophants initiated into the good and the evil of this world; for there was a college of priests called the Aleim, while the head of their caste, or the chief of the hierophants, was known as Java Aleim.” — 1:575
Instead of becoming a neophyte . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Instead of becoming a neophyte, and gradually obtaining his esoteric knowledge through a regular initiation, an Adam, or man, uses his intuitional faculties, and, prompted by the Serpent — Woman and matter — tastes of the Tree of Knowledge — the esoteric or secret doctrine — unlawfully.  The priests of Hercules, or Mel-Karth, the ‘Lord’ of the Eden, all wore ‘coats of skin.’  The text says: ‘And Java Aleim, made for Adam and his wife כתנות עור, ‘chitonuth our.’  The first Hebrew word, chitun, is the Greek χιτών, chiton.  It became a Slavonic word by adoption from the Bible, and means a coat, an upper garment.” — 1:575-6
“Though containing the same substratum of esoteric truth . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Though containing the same substratum of esoteric truth as every early cosmogony, the Hebrew Scripture wears on its face the marks of its double origin.  Its Genesis is purely a reminiscence of the Babylonian captivity.  The names of places, men, and even objects, can be traced from the original text to the Chaldeans and the Akkadians, the progenitors and Aryan instructors of the former.” — 1:576

— 202-3 —

“It is strongly contested that the Akkad tribes . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “It is strongly contested that the Akkad tribes of Chaldea, Babylonia, and Assyria were in any way cognate with the Brahmans, of Hindustan; but there are more proofs in favor of this opinion than otherwise.  The Shemite, or Assyrian, ought, perchance, to have been called the Turanian, and the Mongolians have been denominated Scyths.  But if the Akkadians ever existed otherwise than in the imagination of some philologists and ethnologists, they certainly would never have been a Turanian tribe, as some Assyriologists have striven to make us believe.” — 1:576

— 203 —

“They were simply emigrants on their way to Asia Minor from India . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “They were simply emigrants on their way to Asia Minor from India, the cradle of humanity, and their sacerdotal adepts tarried to civilize and initiate a barbarian people.  Halevy proved the fallacy of the Turanian mania in regard to the Akkadian people, whose very name has been changed a dozen times already; and other scientists have proved that the Babylonian civilization was neither born nor developed in that country.  It was imported from India, and the importers were Brahmanical Hindus.” — 1:576
the culture of . . . Eridu was of foreign importation
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “Along with this culture went the worship of Ea, the god of Eridu . . .”  “Was the culture of Babylonia imported from abroad; and was Ea, its god of culture, of foreign extraction? . . . there is now sufficient evidence to prove that at the very dawn of the historic period in Babylonia, maritime intercourse was being carried on between this country on the one hand . . . and India on the other.”  “This intercourse . . . must necessarily have had much to do with the early development of Chaldæan culture . . .” — pp. 135, 136, 138
“Much of the theology was borrowed by the Semites . . .”
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “. . . the Semitic settlers in Babylonia borrowed a good deal of the theology of the Accadian people . . .” — p. 105
by the Semites from the . . . proto-Chaldeans, whom they supplanted
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “The monuments of Tel-loh . . . The deities they commemorate are Proto-Chaldæan . . . Gradually the encroaching Semite dispossessed the older dynasties and came to form an upper class, first of soldiers and traders, and then of priests also . . .” — pp. 34, 35
Semites and Akkadians, lived side by side, their worship . . . blending
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “We have glimpses . . . of a time when the two populations lived side by side . . . trading and intermarrying, of Semitic conquerors filling their courts with Accadian scribes . . .”  “In fact, it must have been among the priestly literati of Sargon that the union of Accadian and Semitic religious belief took definite shape.” — pp. 213, 215
it is really from the Euxine to Kashmir and beyond . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “It is from the Euxine to Kashmere, and beyond that we must search for the cradle of mankind and the sons of Ad-ah; and leave the particular garden of Ed-en on the Euphrates to the college of the weird astrologers and magi, the Aleim.” — 1:579-80
meaning of the word Eden . . . ἡδονὴ, signifying voluptuousness
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . Éden signifiait volupté {Du mot grec ἡδονὴ} [the meaning of Eden was voluptuousness {From the Greek word ἡδονὴ}].” — 2:370 & fn.
The Garden of Eden . . . in Central Asia
see: “Contemporary Thought,” Dec. 1, 1880: “The original home of the human race, according to the ethnologist, was a little-known region in Asia, situated midway between Central Asia (or Turkestan) and China.  It is named . . . Bam-i-duniah, or ‘Roof of the World.’  Here . . . was the true Garden of Eden . . .” — p. 263 (Victorian Review, v. 3)
see: Laurence Oliphant, Scientific Religion, 1888: “. . . that locality on the earth’s surface symbolised by the garden of Eden . . . in the vicinity of the Pamir plateau, in the Hindoo Koosh, which is sometimes called ‘the roof of the world’ . . .” — p. 247
inhabited by the “Dragons of Wisdom,” the Initiates
see: “Sarpas — Serpents — Nagas”: “Then come the Nagas . . . In Mythology they are semi-divine beings with a human face and the tail of a Dragon.  They are therefore, undeniably, the Jewish seraphim (from Serapis and Sarpa, Serpent) . . . the Dragons and Nagas were the names given to the Initiates-hermits, on account of their great Wisdom and Spirituality . . .” — SD 2:501
see: Laurence Oliphant, Scientific Religion, 1888: “. . . the garden of Eden . . . it may be said that umbilical cord which connected this world with the one which was unfallen, was attached by . . . the Seraphim, who . . . were able to visit it, and . . . make it their abode.” — p. 247

— 203-4 —

according to Klaproth, the hieroglyphical chart . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Suivant Klaproth, dans le livre du Fo-koue-ky, la carte hiéroglyphique tirée de l’Encyclopédie japonaise fixe le plateau de Pamer entre les cimes les plus hautes de l’Himalaya, le désigne comme le point culminant de l’Asie centrale et fait sortir de son Lac des dragons les quatre fleuves: l’Oxus, l’Indus, le Gange et le Silo [According to Klaproth, the hieroglyphic map in the book of Fo-koue-ky, drawn from the Japanese Encyclopedia, places the Pamir plateau between the highest peaks of the Himalaya, describing it as the highest point of Central Asia, and shows the four rivers — Oxus, Indus, Ganges, and Silo — flowing out of its Lake of the Dragons].” — 2:370

— 204 —

Eden Illa-ah — means in one sense Wisdom . . . a paradise of Bliss . . .
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The Zohar . . . calls Wisdom, the Upper Paradise or Eden illa-ah.”  “. . . many centuries before the Christian era, there was in Central Asia, a ‘Wisdom Religion’ . . . Sometimes this was called . . . Paradise, Gan Eden, the Garden of Eden, or Bliss . . . the Place in which was the pure intellectual perception of the Deity.”  “. . . the Garden or Paradise was pure abstract human thought in which was planted, the tree of the Good and Evil . . .” — pp. 205, 219-20, 273
the cradle of humanity “on the region of the Timaus [Imaus]”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “M. Renan . . . Il faut avouer, dit-il, que tout nous ramène à la région de l’Imaüs, où les plus solides inductions placent le berceau de la race âryenne. . . . M. Barthélemy Saint-Hilaire fixe le berceau de l’humanité près des bords de l’Imaüs [Himalaya]. ‘il n’est plus possible, dit-il, de le révoquer en doute’ [Renan . . . says, one has to acknowledge that everything brings us back to the region of the Himalayas, where the most solid inferences place the cradle of the Aryan race. . . . Barthélemy Saint-Hilaire places the cradle of humanity close to the borders of the Himalayas.  ‘it is not possible, he says, to call it into question’].” — 2:371
see: J. T. Walker, “Oxus,” 1885: “. . . the Hindū Kūsh and the Himalayan ranges . . . are here of greatest magnitude . . . A happy instinct has led the inhabitants to call it the Bam-i-dūnia, or Roof of the World . . . It is . . . the northern Imaus of Ptolemy . . . The geographical indications of the Puranas . . . point to it as Meru, the scene of the primeval Aryan paradise.” — p. 102 (Encyclopædia Britannica, v. 18)
“All the traditions of the human race gathering its primitive families . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Enfin, voici les conclusions du Journal asiatique . . . ‘Toutes les traditions de l’espèce humaine, ramenant les familles primitives à la région de leur berceau, nous les montrent groupées autour des contrées où la tradition hébraïque place son jardin d’Eden, où celle des aryas établit l’Airhyâna-Variédya ou le Mérou; elles sont bordées au nord par les contrées qui aboutissent au lac Aral et au midi par le Baltistan ou le petit Thibet.  Tout concourt à prouver que ce fut là le séjour de cette humanité primitive à laquelle nous sommes forcés de remonter’ {Journal asiatique, 7e année, 1855} [Finally, see the conclusions of the Journal Asiatique . . . ‘All the traditions of the human species, tracing back the primitive families to the region of their cradle, show us that they are grouped around the regions where the Jewish tradition places its garden of Eden; where that of the Aryans establishes the Airyana-Vaeja or Meru; they are confined in the north by the countries which end at the Aral Sea and in the south by Baltistan or Little Tibet.  Everything comes together to prove that there was the abode of that primitive humanity to which we have to be traced’].” — 2:371 & fn.
the Paradesa, the highland of the first Sanskrit-speaking people . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Mais que pouvait-il donc se passer dans cet Éden, dans ce parâdésa, ou pays élevé du sanscrit, dans cet hédoné, ou délices des Grecs, dans cet ombrage de volupté des Chaldéens [But then what could have happened in that Eden, in the paradeśa, or the highland of Sanskrit-speaking people, in that land of pleasure or delights of the Greeks, in that shadowland of voluptuousness of the Chaldeans]?” — 2:372
the serpent . . . explained in the Zohar
see: Qabbalah, “Translated from the Zohar,” tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘At that time when Samä-el descended from heaven . . . he reached to that woman with sweet words and . . . with wisdom (subtility) he brought curses upon the world . . .’ ”  “ ‘Samä-el . . . sought upon the earth a companion like himself and he found the Serpent and it had . . . [an] appearance, like a camel; so he rode upon it and came to that woman . . .’ ” — p. 431

— 205 —

the Zohar . . . tells us that the serpent . . . was a kind of flying camel
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . le Zohar nous affirmait-il que ‘le serpent dont Sammael s’était servi pour séduire Ève était une sorte de chameau volant comme un oiseau, κάμηλομορφον {Moses Maimon. (More nevochim)} [the Zohar assured us that the serpent which Samael used to seduce Eve was a kind of camel that flies like a bird {Moses Maimonides, More Nevochim}].” — 2:423 & fn.
Aschmogh . . . having lost after the Fall “its nature and its name”
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . dans l’Avesta . . . le serpent, après la chute, avait perdu avec sa nature son ancien nom d’Aschmogh [in the Avesta . . . the serpent, after the fall, had lost his ancient name Ashmogh, as well as his nature].” — 2:423
“There are no winged serpents, nor veritable dragons” . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “ ‘II n’existe pas de serpents ailés, dit Salverte {Sciences occultes, p. 464}, de véritables dragons . . . Les sauterelles sont encore appelées serpents ailés par les Grecs, et cette métaphore peut avoir créé plusieurs récits sur l’existence des serpents ailés’ [‘Winged serpents do not exist, says Salverte, nor do real dragons . . . Grasshoppers are still called winged serpents by the Greeks, and this metaphor may have created several stories about the existence of winged serpents’].” — 2:430 & fn.
Cuvier, who has reconstructed their skeletons . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . la terre vous a rendu la charpente conservée de tous ces monstres. . . . C’est Cuvier qui les reconstruit [the earth has yielded the preserved skeletons of all these monsters . . . Cuvier reconstructs them] . . .” — 2:430
the great naturalist has written . . . “if anything can justify the Hydra . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Vous avez donc oublié que, n’ayant encore trouvé que des sauriens ou serpents rampants, ce grand homme écrivait déjà: ‘Si quelque chose pouvait justifier les hydres et ces autres monstres dont les historiens du moyen âge ont si souvent répété les figures, ce serait incontestablement le plesiosaurus’ {Révolution du globe, t. V, p. 247} [So you have forgotten that this great man, after finding only lizards or crawling snakes, even then wrote: ‘If anything could justify the hydras and other monsters, whose images were so often repeated by medieval historians, this would indisputably be the plesiosaurus’].” — 2:430 & fn.
he found himself in the presence of a flying saurian, “the Pterodactyl” . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . il se fut trouvé en présence d’un saurien volant, ‘du ptérodactyle trouvé en Allemagne, ayant soixante-dix-huit pieds de longueur, et portant des ailes vigoureuses attachées à son corps de reptile’ [he found himself in the presence of a flying saurian, ‘the pterodactyl found in Germany, seventy-eight feet long, and having sturdy wings attached to its reptilian body’] . . .” — 2:430-1
the little fingers . . . are so elongated as to bear a . . . membranous wing
see: H. D. Northrup, Earth, Sea and Sky, 1887: “. . . the pterodactyl . . . is evidently and expressly contrived for flight . . .”  “. . . the number of joints in that which corresponds to the little finger is increased to five, and each joint is enormously lengthened.  To the whole of the little finger, thus produced till it has become longer than the body and neck together, a membranous wing was attached . . .” — pp. 69, 70
a long-necked dragon. . . . the Mosasaurus . . .
see: Edward Cope, Synopsis of the Extinct . . . Reptilia, Part I, 1869: “. . . we may look upon the Mosasauroids and their allies as a race of gigantic marine serpent-like Reptiles, with powers of swimming and running like the modern Ophidia. . . . Thus in the Mosasauroids we almost realize the fictions of snake-like dragons . . .” — p. 182
characters in its vertebræ . . . indicate union with the Ophidia . . .
see: Edward Cope, Synopsis of the Extinct . . . Reptilia, Part I, 1869: “These separate elements . . . are characteristic of the cervical vertebræ of this whole group . . . Though the separation of the extremital pieces is Lacertilian [lizard-like], they are in . . . [their] great length . . . paralleled by those of the serpents [Ophidia].” — p. 179

— 206 —

the prophets speak in the Bible of . . . fiery serpents
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . out of the serpent’s root shall come forth a basilisk, and his fruit shall be a fiery flying serpent.” — p. 895 (Isaiah, 14:29)
and Job mentions the Leviathan
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “Canst thou draw out leviathan with a fish hook? . . . Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons? . . . None is so fierce that he dare stir him up . . .” — pp. 705-6 (Job, 41:1, 7, 10)

— Footnotes

the “naive astonishment of Geoffrey St. Hilaire . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “On se rappelle encore l’étonnement naïf des Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, lorsque M. de Paravey lui montra, dans les livres chinois et sur quelques briques de Babylone, les dragons . . . les ornithoringues, les sauriens, etc. . . . qu’il croyait inconnus à la terre . . . jusqu’à lui [One still remembers the naive astonishment of Geoffroy St. Hilaire, when De Paravey showed him, in Chinese books and on some Babylonian tiles, dragons . . . ornithorynchuses, saurians, etc. . . . which he believed to be unknown on earth . . . until his own time] . . .” — 2:431
“The viper and the flying serpent . . .”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . into the land of trouble and anguish, from whence come . . . the viper and the fiery flying serpent . . .” — p. 909 (Isaiah, 30:6)
saraph mehophep . . . fiery venom, and . . . flying
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Ce dernier serpent est appelé, dans le texte sacré, saraph mehòphép. . . . dans tous les lexiques hébreux, saraph est traduit par venin enflammé, et mehòphép l’est par volant [In the sacred text (Isaiah, 30:8), that last serpent is called sāraph mehophep. . . . in all the Hebrew lexicons saraph is translated by fiery venom, and mehophep by flying].” — 2:423 fn.
In Bretagne the word Drouk now signifies “devil” . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “En breton, drouk signifie diable, d’où le droghedanum sepulcrum, ou tombeau diabolique, que l’on voit en Angleterre. . . . (Voir Cambry, Monuments celtiques, p. 299) [In Breton, drouk means devil, whence the droghedanum sepulcrum or devil’s tomb that one sees in England. . . . (See Cambry, Monuments celtiques, p. 299)].” — 2:423 fn.
In Languedoc the . . . will-o’-the-wisps are called Dragg . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Les Languedociens appellent encore les esprits follets drac; en français drogg, et en breton dreag, wraie, ont évidemment la même origine; le château de Drogheda, en Bretagne, n’a pas d’autre étymologie [The people of Languedoc still call will-o’-the-wisps (ghostly lights) drac, in French drogg, and in Breton dreag, wraie, and they obviously have the same origin; the castle of Drogheda, in Bretagne, has no other etymology than this].” — 2:423 fn.

— 207 —

Petrarch . . . is credited with having found a dragon . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Pétrarque . . . son poëte suivant un jour sa Laure à la chasse, et passant auprès d’une caverne, un dragon allait se précipiter sur la dame, et certainement la dévorer, lorsque le poëte amoureux le poignarda de sa propre main [Petrarch . . . while his poet followed his Laura on a hunt and passed near a cave, a dragon threw itself on the lady, and was ready to devour her, when the lover-poet himself stabbed it with his dagger].” — 2:425

— Footnotes

Kircher . . . saw a dragon which was killed in 1669 . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . le bon Kircher . . . s’avisa de publier, dans un de ses in-folio, le portrait d’un véritable dragon que venait de tuer, en 1669, un paysan de la campagne de Rome, et que le directeur du musée Barberini venait de lui faire remettre {Œdipus Ægypt., de Genesi draconum} [the good Kircher . . . dared to publish, in one of his folio volumes, the portrait of a veritable dragon, which in 1669 had killed a peasant from the countryside of Rome, and which the director of the Barberini Museum had sent to him].” — 2:424 & fn.
see: Athanasius Kircher, Mundus Subterraneus, 1665: “Anno 1660 . . . Lanio quidam Romanus dum aucupii causa in palustres maritimæ oræ partes sese conferret . . . loco avium palustrium, draconem grandioris vulturis magnitudine obvium habuit, qui volucrem arbitratus, selopum contra ipsum exoneravit . . . ut statim præcipiti quà cursu qua volatu . . . venatorem invaserit, is . . . guttur ita disrupit, ut statim occubuerit . . . domum reversus eadem nocte mortuus est, toto corpore diffusione veneni viridis. [In the year 1660 . . . Lanio, a certain Roman, while hunting for birds on the edge of the coastal marshes . . . instead of marsh birds, he came across a dragon, the size of a large vulture . . . he judged it to be a bird, and unloaded his shotgun into it . . . and so provoked the beast, so that it immediately propelled itself headlong, partly running, partly flying . . . and attacked the hunter.  He . . . ruptured its throat, so that it died instantly, but . . . returning home that same night, he himself died.  His whole body was overcome by a green poison].” — 2:90 (Lib. 8, iv.2)
the director of the Museo Barberini sent it to him
see: Athanasius Kircher, Mundus Subterraneus, 1665: “. . . caput draconis . . . mihi allatum fuit à . . . Musæi Card. Barberini præfecto . . . & omnibus in meo Musæo spectandum exhibetur [the dragon’s head . . . was sent to me by the . . . director of the museum of Cardinal Barberini. . . . It is exhibited for all to see in my museum].” — 2:90 (Lib. 8, iv.2)
Christopher Scherer . . . certifies to his having seen . . . a living dragon
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . Christophore Scherer, préfet du canton de Soleure.  ‘Rien n’est plus véritable, lui répondit celui-ci, et je puis même vous donner mon propre témoignage’ [Christopher Scherer, prefect of the Canton Solothurn.  ‘Nothing is truer, that man responded to him, and I can even give you my own testimony’] . . .” — 2:424
Having remained . . . “to contemplate . . . I saw a fiery, shining dragon . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “ ‘. . . me trouvant près de Lucerne, en 1619, et pendant une belle nuit étant resté à contempler la parfaite pureté du firmament, je vis un dragon brillant s’élancer d’une des cavernes du Pilate, et se diriger d’un vol impétueux vers Fluelen, à l’autre extrémité du lac.  Énorme de taille, sa queue était encore plus longue et son col étendu.  Sa tête et sa gueule étaient celles d’un serpent.  En volant, il semait sur son passage de nombreuses étincelles [I was near Lucerne in 1619, and during a beautiful night while remaining to contemplate the perfect purity of the heavens, I saw a shining dragon rush forward from one of the caves of Mount Pilatus, and proceed with an impetuous flight in the direction of Flüelen, at the other end of the lake.  Enormous in size, his tail was even longer and his neck stretched out.  His head and his mouth were those of a serpent.  In flying it scattered around numerous sparks] . . .’ ” — 2:424
“I thought at first I was seeing a meteor . . . “
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Je crus voir d’abord un météore, mais en observant plus attentivement encore, je ne tardai pas à me convaincre, en examinant son vol et la conformation de tous ses membres, que j’avais sous les yeux un véritable dragon.  Je suis heureux, par cette déclaration, de pouvoir éclairer votre révérence sur l’existence très-réelle de ces animaux [I thought at first I was seeing a meteor, but while looking again more attentively, I soon convinced myself, by examining his flight and the conformation of all his limbs, that I was seeing a true dragon.  I am happy to be able, with this declaration, to enlighten your Reverence on the very real existence of these animals].” — 2:424
the picture . . . painted by Simon de Sienne . . . on the portal of the Church . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . Simon de Sienne, ami du poëte . . . peignit cette aventure sur le portail de l’église de Notre-Dame du Don à Avignon. . . . mais le souverain pontife ne voulut jamais permettre que ce triomphe de l’amour fût intronisé dans le lieu saint. . . . Le temps a dégradé l’ouvrage, mais n’a pas affaibli la tradition [Simon de Sienne, friend of the poet (Petrarch) . . . painted that adventure on the portal of the church Notre Dame du Don in Avignon . . but the sovereign Pontif would never allow that this triumph of love be glorified in the holy place . . . Time has degraded the work, but it has not weakened the tradition].” — 2:425
the dragon embalmed by Ulysses Aldobranda . . . “was there still in 1700 . . .”
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . Horace Fontana, le lui fait porter à Ulysse Aldovrandus, savant bolonais.  Celui-ci le fait . . . embaumer et le donne au Musée du sénat, où il était encore en 1700 [Horatius Fontana has it taken to Ulysses Aldovrandus, a scholar of Bologna.  This man has it . . . embalmed and gives it to the Museum of the Senate, where it still was in 1700].” — 2:427

— 208 —

Sed et serpens
p/q: The Hexaglot Bible, 1901: “Sed et serpens erat callidior [Now the serpent was more subtile] . . .” — p. 8 (Genesis, 3:3)
the serpent of Genesis an animal emblem and a high spiritual essence . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Le serpent de la Genèse peut donc être considéré sous deux aspects très-différents, comme essence spirituelle et comme emblème animal.  Au premier point de vue, il y a là évidemment une force cosmique et surintelligente du premier ordre, une grande lumière tombée, un esprit tout à la fois sidéral, aérien et tellurique dont l’influence circule autour du globe (qui circum ambulat terram) [The serpent of Genesis can thus be considered under two very different aspects, as spritual essence and as animal emblem.  In the first point of view, there is obviously a cosmic and superintelligent force of the first order, a great fallen light, a spirit who is at the same time sidereal, aerial and telluric, whose influence moves around the globe] . . .” — 2:422
manifested itself . . . “with respect to its moral and intellectual coils
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . et qui se sera manifesté ensuite sous l’emblème physique qui convenait le mieux à ses replis intellectuels et moraux, c’est-à-dire sous l’emblème du serpent [and which will then manifest itself under the physical emblem, which is best suited to its intellectual and moral coils, that is, under the emblem of the serpent].” — 2:422
what will Christians make of the Brazen Serpent, the “divine healer
see: John Peter Lange, Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, The New Testament, 1871: “. . . in Num. xxi. 8: Moses, at the command of God, set up a brazen serpent {as a healer instead of a destroyer.  In Egyptian theology the serpent is the symbol of healing} . . .” — 3:132 & fn.
Mercury and Æsculapius . . . the wand and serpent
see: Frederic T. Hall, The Pedigree of the Devil, 1883: “. . . [amongst] Christians, it [the serpent] has been most thoroughly demonized, and the deities whose attributes were connected with the serpent have generally shared the same fate.”  “. . . Mercury, or Hermes, the messenger of the gods, and the mediator for men in Hades, has drifted into the same company . . .” — pp. 120, 121
see: M. A. Dwight, Grecian and Roman Mythology, 1849: “hermes or mercury . . . Apollo gave him the golden wand, which had the power of settling all differences . . .”  “There is no emblem to be found more expressive of reconciliation and peace . . . than this wand surrounded with coiling serpents . . .”  “. . . the caduceus or wand presented to him by Apollo . . . had the power . . . of bringing souls out of Hell.” — pp. 243, 244, 248
“The snake, as an emblem of recovery and health, was sacred to Asclepios . . . Hence the god of medicine always carries a staff, around which is twined a snake.” — p. 282
the Sun . . . cosmic emblem of the two contrasted lights . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . le soleil était l’emblème cosmique de ces deux serpents et de ces deux lumières [the sun was the cosmic emblem of those two serpents and those two lights] . . .” — 2:422
it is sufficient to trace the legends of the serpents to their primal source . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Il suffit, dit M. Salverte de remonter à la légende astronomique, et de méditer sérieusement sur le soleil vainqueur de Python, et sur la Vierge céleste faisant reculer dans le zodiaque le dragon dévorant [It is sufficient, says Salverte, to go back to the astronomical legend, and to meditate seriously on the sun, conqueror of Python, and on the celestial Virgin, who in the Zodiac force back the devouring dragon].” — 2:429

— 209 —

“from the fall of man until the hour of his baptism . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Le concile de Trente le déclare: ‘Depuis la chute jusqu’au baptême, le diable a plein pouvoir sur l’homme et le possède de droit, diabolum dominium et potestatem super homines habere el jure eos possidere’ [The Council of Trent announces it: ‘From the Fall until baptism, the devil has full power over man and possesses him by right’].” — 2:433
“The whole of humanity ‘incensed and . . . stoned it’ . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Le serpent . . . Toute la terre l’encense ou le lapide.  Les Zends parlent de lui comme les Kings, comme les Védas, comme l’Edda, comme le Mexicain et comme le Copte, et la Bible ne contredit jamais aucun d’eux [The serpent . . . The whole world adulates it or stones it to death.  The Zend Avesta speaks of it, as do the Chinese texts, the Vedas, the Edda, the Mexican and the Copt, and the Bible never contradicts any of those].” — 2:431
“Everywhere the sacred serpent, the naga, and its shrine . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Partout le serpent sacré a son temple et son prêtre; à Rome, la Vestale est préposée à sa garde et prépare ses repas avec le même soin qu’elle entretient le feu sacré.  En Grèce, Esculape ne guérit rien sans lui et lui délègue ses pouvoirs [Everywhere the sacred serpent has its temple and its priest; in Rome the Vestal Virgin is put in charge of its care and prepares its meals with the same care with which she maintains the sacred fire.  In Greece, Aesculapius does not heal anything without it and delegates to it his powers].” — 2:432
“Every one has heard of the famous Roman embassy . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “On connaît la fameuse ambassade romaine envoyée par le sénat au dieu de la médecine, et son retour avec le fameux serpent qui, de lui-même alla gagner le fameux temple de son maître, dans une des Iles du Tibre [Everyone has heard of the famous Roman embassy sent by the Senate to the god of medicine, and its return with the famous serpent, which went by itself to acquire the famous temple of his master, on one of the islands in the Tiber].” — 2:432 fn.
“Not a Bacchante that did not wind it (the serpent) in her hair . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Pas une Bacchante qui ne l’enlace à ses cheveux, pas un augure qui ne l’interroge avec soin, pas un nécromant dont il n’habite les tombeaux!  Les Caïnites et les Ophites l’appellent créateur, tout en reconnaissant comme Schelling qu’il est ‘le mal en substance et en personne’ [Not a Bacchante (priestess of Bacchus) who did not wind it in her hair, not an augur but questions it with attention, not a necromancer in whose tombs it does not live!  The Cainites and the Ophites call it creator, fully recognizing like Schelling that it is ‘evil in substance and in person’].” — 2:432
if one would have a complete idea of the prestige . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Mais si l’on voulait prendre une idée complète du prestige qu’il exerce encore aujourd’hui, il faudrait étudier ce culte chez les Indiens modernes ou Nagas (serpents), chez les Chamanes, chez les Africains de Juidah, chez les Vaudoux de Port-au-Prince et d’Haïti, chez les Chânes du Mexique, chez les hommes Pà ou serpents des Chinois, etc. [But if one wanted to get a complete idea of the prestige it still holds in our day, one should study this cult with the modern Indian people or Nagas (serpents), with the Shamans, with the Africans of Whydah (in Benin), with the Voodoos of Port-au-Prince and Haiti, with the Shamans of Mexico (Naguals), and the Pa, or serpents of China, etc.].” — 2:432

— 210 —

the word dragon signified . . . “the being who excels in intelligence” . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . le mot dragon, signifiant dans toutes les anciennes langues, ce qu’il signifie en chinois (long), c’est-à-dire ‘l’être qui excelle en intelligence,’ comme en grec, δράκων ‘celui qui voit et qui surveille’ [the word dragon, meaning in all ancient languages, what it means in Chinese (long), that is, ‘the being which excels in intelligence,’ as in the Greek δράκων ‘he who sees and watches’].” — 2:423
the human originals, who were symbolized by serpents . . .
see: C. Staniland Wake, Serpent-Worship, 1888: “The Upanishads refer to the science of serpents, by which is meant the wisdom of the mysterious Nagas . . . ‘fabulous creatures of the nature of serpents, who occupy a place among the beings superior to man . . . To these spiritual beings Sākyamuni is said to have taught a more philosophical religious system than to men’ . . . it can mean only that Gautama taught his most secret doctrines to the Nagas, or aboriginal serpent-worshippers . . .” — pp. 91-2
called to this day in China “the Dragons of Wisdom”
see: Ernest J. Eitel, Hand-Book of Chinese Buddhism, 1888: “NĀGA . . . dragon spirit . . . The worship of Nāgas (i.e. dragons and serpents) is indigenous in China and flourishes even now . . . All the most ancient Sūtras and biographies of Buddha mention Nāgas, who . . . conversed with him, protected him, were converted by him . . .” — pp. 102-3
The symbol of Chnouphis . . . “an enormous serpent . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Le symbole de Cnouphis, ou l’âme du monde, dit Champollion, est donné, entre autres, sous la forme d’un énorme serpent monté sur des jambes humaines, et ce reptile, emblème du bon génie, le véritable Agathodæmon, est souvent barbu [The symbol of Cnouphis, or the soul of the world, says Champollion, is given, among other things, in the form of an enormous serpent on human legs; and this reptile, the emblem of the good genie, the true Agathodæmon, often has a beard] . . .” — 3:333
“That sacred animal, identical with the serpent of the Ophites . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Cet animal sacré, identique à celui des Ophites, est figuré ainsi sur un très-grand nombre de pierres gravées, dites gnostiques ou basilidiennes.  Ce serpent y porte des têtes très-variées, mais il y est constamment accompagné des lettres XNOΥBIΣ, Chnoubis {Panthéon, texte 3} [That sacred animal, identical with that of the Ophites, is thus represented on a very large number of engraved stones, said to be Gnostic or Basilidean.  This serpent has various heads, but it constantly goes with the letters XNOΥBIΣ, Chnoubis].” — 3:333 & fn.
Agathodæmon was endowed “with the knowledge of good and evil”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “M. Champollion aurait dû reconnaître dans ce bon démon le serpent des Ophites, que les gnostiques plaçaient au-dessus de Jésus-Christ comme ayant, disaient-ils, la connaissance du bien et du mal [Champollion must have recognized the serpent of the Ophites in that good demon (Agathodæmon), which the Gnostics placed above Jesus Christ, because it is said to have the knowledge of good and evil].” — 3:333

— Footnotes

The solar Chnouphis, or Agathodæmon, is the Christos . . .
see: C. Staniland Wake, The Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “The Serpent, enclosed in a pyramid . . . is taken from a [Gnostic] gem . . . said to be the Solar Chnouphis or Agathodemon — Christos, with the seven sons of Sophia (Wisdom), the seven planetary genii.” — p. v (Preface)
in “Historia Anti-Islamitica” five Hermes
see: C. Staniland Wake, Origin and Significance of the Great Pyramid, 1882: “The following is Dr. Sprenger’s account . . . of Seth and Hermes . . . ‘In Abul Feda’s “Historia Anteislamitica” . . . it is stated . . . that the Sabæan language was established by Seth and Edris (Enoch) . . . In the Syrian chronicle of Bar-Hebræus . . . Enoch is said to have invented letters and architecture, under the title of Trismigistus, or of Hermes . . . One of the sons of Aunshirwan has also that title. . . . In this manner there were five Hermes; and the fifth was the Oriental Hermes who . . . is said to have fled after the death of Argus into Egypt, and to have civilized that country under the name of Thoth.’ ” — pp. 94-7
Nebo . . . gave his name to all the great prophets . . .
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “Nebo, the son of Merodach and Zarpanitu . . .”  “The word Nebo . . . means ‘the proclaimer,’ ‘the prophet,’ and thus indicates the character of the god to whom it was applied. . . . Nebo was emphatically the god of science and literature.  The communication of the gifts of wisdom . . . was thus shared between Merodach and his son.” — pp. 112, 113
Merodach . . . (whom Herodotus calls Zeus-Belos)
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “. . . Merodach . . . has the standing title of Bilu or ‘lord,’ which the Greeks turned into Βῆλος . . . The temple or ‘tomb’ of Bêlos . . . was one of the wonders of the world.  Hêrodotus . . . describes it in the following terms: ‘The temple of Zeus Bêlos . . . was a square building two furlongs every way.  In the middle of the temple was a tower of solid masonry, a furlong in length and breadth, and upon this tower another tower had been erected, and upon that again another, and so on for eight towers.’ ” — pp. 92-3

— 210-11 —

“the deity called Ἑιχτῶν . . .”
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . c’est encore celui qui, d’après Jamblique et Champollion, ‘s’appellait Εικτῶν ou le premier des dieux célestes (le grand Hermès), auquel l’Hermès Trismégiste attribue l’invention de la magie’ [So it is he, who according to Iamblichus and Champollion, ‘is called Εικτῶν or the first of the celestial gods (the great Hermes), to whom Hermes Trismegistus attributes the invention of magic’].” — 3:333 (Panthéon Égyptien, texte 15)

— 211 —

the discovery of radiant matter . . . Prof. Crookes
see: William Crookes, “On a Fourth State of Matter,” June 18, 1880: “In gases the molecules fly about in every conceivable direction, with constant collisions . . . the length of the mean free path of the molecules is exceedingly small . . . Matter in the fourth state is the ultimate result of gaseous expansion.  By great rarefaction the free path of the molecules is  made so long that . . . the properties which constitute gaseity are reduced to a minimum, and the matter then becomes exalted to an ultra-gaseous state.  But the same condition of things will be produced if by any means we can take a portion of gas, and by some extraneous force infuse order into the apparently disorderly jostling of the molecules in every direction, by coercing them into a methodical rectilinear movement. . . . according to the extent to which this onward movement has replaced the irregular motions which constitute the essence of the gaseous condition, to that extent do I consider that the molecules have assumed the condition of radiant matter.” — pp. 275-6 (Chemical News, v. 41)
Enoch (Enöichion, the “inner, spiritual eye”)
see: Alexandre Guiraud, Philosophie Catholique de l’Histoire, 1841: “Et si nous examinons . . . comment la cabale grecque envisage le nom et la vie d’Hénoch . . . qu’elle rapporte le premier aux deux mots grecs en okion . . . œil intérieur [And when we examine how the Greek Kabbalah looks at the name and the life of Enoch (we discover) . . . that it attributes the former to the two Greek words en okion . . . inner eye] . . .” — 2:374
The dying Jacob thus describes his sons . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The dying Jacob thus describes his sons: ‘Dan,’ says he, ‘shall be a serpent by the way, an adder in the path, that biteth the horse-heels, so that his rider shall fall backward. . . . I have waited for thy salvation, O Lord!’ [Gen. 49:17-18].” — 1:555

— 211-12 —

Of Simeon and Levi the patriarch remarks . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Of Simeon and Levi, the patriarch (or Israel) remarks that they ‘. . . are brethren; instruments of cruelty are in their habitations.  O my soul, come not thou into their secret; unto their assembly.’ [Gen. 49:5-6].” — 1:555

— 212 —

“. . . come not thou into their secret; unto their assembly.” . . . “their Sod.”
see: Julius Fuerst, Hebrew & Chaldee Lexicon, 1867: “סוד [Sod]. . . counsel, taken together and confidential . . . Gen. 49, 6 . . . a determination taken in a confidential circle . . . a secret . . .” — pp. 970-1
see: John Morris, The New Nation, 1880:
“Hebrew       Sod (סוד) , a secret, an assembly.
      Gen. xlix. 6, come not thou into their secret.” — 2:252
in the original, the words “their secret” . . . are “their Sod.”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Now, in the original, the words ‘their secret,’ read — their Sod.  And Sod was the name for the great Mysteries of Baal, Adonis, and Bacchus who were all sun-gods and had serpents for symbols.  The kabalists explain the allegory of the fiery serpents by saying, that this was the name given to the tribe of Levi, to all the Levites in short, and that Moses was the chief of the Sodales {members of the priest-colleges}.” — 1:555 & fn.
meaning of the “Dragon-Slayers” . . . fully treated of hereafter
see: “The Origin of the Satanic Myth,” SD 2:378-90.
the “abominations” of the people of Israel
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . Alas for all the evil abominations of the house of Israel! for they shall fall by the sword, by the famine, and by the pestilence.” — p. 1041 (Ezekiel, 6:11)
the priestly caste, after they had departed from the good law
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “Her priests have violated my law . . . they have put no difference between the holy and profane . . .” — p. 1064 (Ezekiel, 22:26)
Isaiah, when referring to the “rebellious children”
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . the Lord hath spoken, I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me.” — p. 879 (Isaiah, 1:2)
      “Woe to the rebellious children, saith the Lord, that take counsel, but not of me . . .” — p. 908 (Isaiah, 30:1)
into the land whence come  “the viper and fiery flying serpent” . . .
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . into the land of trouble and anguish, from whence come . . . the viper and fiery flying serpent, they will carry their riches . . . to a people that shall not profit them.” — p. 909 (Isaiah, 30:6)
see: François Lenormant, Chaldean Magic, 1877: “It was the general belief in Syria, as well as in Chaldea, and Mesopotamia, that demons inhabited the desert . . . Isaiah, in describing the destruction of Edom says . . . it shall be an habitation of dragons [34:13] . . .” — p. 31
Chaldea and Egypt, whose Initiates . . . the sorcerers
see: François Lenormant, Chaldean Magic, 1877: “The priest of magic is the same as the sorcerer; following the caprices of his will, he exercises his mysterious power [f]or good or evil, according as he has been made a friend or a foe.”  “Egypt and Chaldea are . . . the two sources of all learned magic for Greek and Latin antiquity, as well as for Jewish and Arabian tradition.” — pp. 72, 78

— Footnotes

Dunlap . . . explains the word “Sod” as arcanum, religious mystery . . .
see: S. F. Dunlap, Sōd, The Mysteries of Adoni, 1861: “SOD, ‘arcanum.’  SOD means Mysteries. — Schindler’s Penteglott, 1201 . . . commonly a religious mystery. — Donnegan’s Greek Lexicon, 864.” — p. xi fn. (Introduction)
“The secret of the Lord is with them that fear him”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906:
“The secret of the Lord is with them that fear him;
  And he will shew them his covenant.” — p. 724 (Psalms, 25:14)
it ought to read “Sod Ihoh (the mysteries of Ihoh) . . .”
p/q: S. F. Dunlap, Sōd, The Mysteries of Adoni, 1861: “Sod Ihoh (the Mysteries of Iahoh) are for those who fear him {the initiated}. — Psalm, xxv. 14.” — p. xi & fn.
“Al (El) is terrible in the great Sod of the Kadeshim . . .”
p/q: S. F. Dunlap, Sōd, The Mysteries of Adoni, 1861: “Al is terrible in the great Sod (assembly, Mysteries) of the Kedeshim (the priests, the holy, initiated). — Psalm, lxxxix. 8.” — p. xi
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “God is greatly to be feared in the assembly of the saints. . .” — p. 775 (Psalms, 89:7)
The Kadeshim were very far from holy. . . .
see: “The ‘Holy of Holies.’  Its Degradation”: “Kadesh may mean in one sense to devote, hallow, sanctify . . . but it also means the ministry of lascivious rites (the Venus-worship) and the true interpretation of the word Kadesh is bluntly rendered in Deuteronomy xxiii. 17; Hosea iv. 14; and Genesis xxxvii. from verses 15 to 22.” — SD 2:460
“The members of the priest-Colleges were called Sodales” . . .
p/q: S. F. Dunlap, Sōd, The Mysteries of Adoni, 1861: “The members of the Priest-colleges were called SODales. — Freund’s Latin Lexicon, iv. 448.” — p. xii
“Sodalities were constituted in the Idæan Mysteries . . .”
p/q: S. F. Dunlap, Sōd, The Mysteries of Adoni, 1861: “SODalities were constituted in the Idaean Mysteries of the Mighty Mother. — Cicero, de Senectute, 13, 45.” — p. xii
“Saraph” — “fiery or flaming venom.”
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . dans tous les lexiques hébreux, saraph est traduit par venin enflammé [in all the Hebrew lexicons saraph is translated by fiery venom] . . .” — 2:423 fn.

— 213 —

“four good men” . . . “who were neither begotten by the gods . . .”
p/q: Max Müller, Chips from a German Workshop, 1867: “Four men are mentioned as the real ancestors of the human race, or rather of the race of the Quichés.  They were neither begotten by the gods nor born of woman, but their creation was a wonder wrought by the Creator.” — 1:336-7
who were made only after “three attempts . . . had failed
p/q: Max Müller, Chips from a German Workshop, 1867: “Three attempts . . . had been made and had failed.  We now hear again that before the beginning of dawn, and before the sun and moon had risen, man had been made . . .” — 1:336
The Egyptians had in their theology only “four sons of God”
see: Gerald Massey, Natural Genesis, 1883: “In Egypt the four elementals of the four corners were stationed finally as the four souls (or Rams) of Ra . . . the four being compounded into the one God, called Primordial force.” — 1:416
in Pymander seven are given
see: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes, tr. J. D. Chambers, 1882: “But the Mind, The God . . . begat by Word another Mind Creator, Who . . . created some Seven Administrators . . .”  “For the Nature mingled with the Man . . . immediately brought forth the seven men after the natures of the Seven Administrators . . .” — pp. 4-5, 9 (Poemandres, i.9, 16)
when Seth from a god sank into Set-Typhon
see: Gerald Massey, Natural Genesis, 1883: “In the Ritual the Four Quarters are associated with the Serpent of Seven heads. . . . ‘The Great one shining with his body as a God is Sut [Set or Seth].’ . . . In this passage Sut is not the evil one . . .” — 1:346
      “The Serpent-Type . . . was made a type of Time, periodic renewal, eternal circulation . . . In its third phase the type of Evil in the physical domain was reproduced as the Evil One, the Dragon, the Devil . . . the ancient Dragon Typhon who had been the Nurse of Souls in the present life was turned into their devourer in the future state. . . . Sut [Set] or Sevekh, is identified with the Apophis Monster . . . and changed into the personal Satan of theology . . .”  “Sut-Typhon the cast-out Satan of Egypt, had been degraded into the Apophis type of darkness . . .” — 1:362, 365
Set-Typhon . . . called “the seventh son”
see: George Stanley Faber, Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, 1803: “As Cronus then is . . . the father of seven sons by Rhea . . . These last of his children were called Titans . . .” — 1:79-80
see: J. Gardner Wilkinson, Manners and Customs of the Ancient Egyptians, 1883: “The giants, sons of the earth [Rhea], came afterwards, and Typhon was the last of them . . .” — 2:480
“the seventh son of the seventh son” . . . a natural-born magician
see: Gerald Massey, Ancient Egypt, 1907: “The divine man was the diviner, the seer, the sorcerer, the spirit-medium with all the early races.”  “The spiritual medium ruled as a seer, a sorcerer, a diviner, a healer . . . because he was held to be in league with the spirit world . . .” — 1:171, 172
      “The divine man as the seventh of a series is yet extant and operative in British folk-lore when the seventh son of a seventh son is always the great healer.” — 1:431
Apap . . . is slain by Aker, Set’s serpent
see: Livre des Morts, tr. Paul Pierret, 1882: “Apap est renversé . . . Aker l’a renversé . . . Apap, l’ennemi de Ra . . . le grand Apap est tombé [Apap is overthrown . . . Aker has overthrown him . . . Apap, the enemy of Ra . . . the great Apap has fallen].” — p. 136 (xxxix.5-7)
      “Aker. . . . Le serpent A. de Set [Aker. . . . The serpent A. of Set] . . .” — pp. 588-9 (Index Analytique)
clxiii. should be read “in the presence of a serpent on two legs”
p/q: Livre des Morts, tr. Paul Pierret, 1882: “Le ch. clxiii devait être dit sur un s. [serpent] à deux jambes [Ch. clxiii must be said over a serpent with two legs] . . .” — p. 646 (Index Analytique)
the discus and ram’s horns that adorn his “serpent’s” head
see: Livre des Morts, tr. Paul Pierret, 1882: “Titre du chapitre clxiii. . . . Tableau . . . un serpent à jambes humaines coiffé du disque et des cornes [Title of chapter clxiii. . . . Tableau: . . . a serpent with human legs with a disc and horns on his head].” — p. 557
Over the “serpent” . . . the two mystic eyes of Ammon
see: Livre des Morts, tr. Paul Pierret, 1882: “Tableau: deux yeux symboliques ailés et portés par des jambes humaines; suit un serpent à jambes humaines [Tableau: two symbolic eyes, winged and supported by human legs; follows a serpent on human legs] . . .” — p. 557 (clxiii)
      “. . . O Ammon! . . . maître des deux yeux! [O Ammon! . . . master of the two eyes!] . . .” — p. 559 (clxiii.9-10)
see: Le Papyrus Magique Harris, tr. F. Chabas, 1860: “yeux symboliques. . . .Papayrus Yeux symboliques ayant des ailes et des jambes, et des figures mystiques dans la pupille [Symbolic eyes that have wings and legs, and mystical figures in the pupils] . . .” — p. 198 (Index Raisonné)
Ammon, the hidden “mystery god”
see: Le Papyrus Magique Harris, tr. F. Chabas, 1860:
“O Ammon, qui se cache dans sa pupille!
  Ame qui brille dans son œil sacré
  [O Ammon, who hides himself in his pupil!
  The Soul that shines brightly in his sacred eye!].” — p. 142 (V. vii, “Hymne à Ammon-Ra”)
“The Nargal was the Chaldean and Assyrian chief of the Magi . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “. . . the Nargal, the Chaldean and Assyrian chief of the Magi (Rab-Mag) and the Nagal, the chief sorcerer of the Mexican Indians.  Both derive their names from Nergal-Sarezer, the Assyrian god . . .” — 1:556
see: John Kitto, Cyclopœdia of Biblical Literature, 1865: “NERGAL . . . a deity of the Cuthites in the Assyrian empire . . . He was the God of war and hunting . . .”  “NERGAL-SHAREZER . . . The chief of the magi (Rab-mag) . . .” — 3:313
“Both have . . . the power to have an attendant dæmon . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “. . . and both have the same faculties, or powers to have an attendant dæmon with whom they identify themselves completely.  The Chaldean and Assyrian Nargal kept his dæmon, in the shape of some animal considered sacred, inside the temple; the Indian Nagal keeps his wherever he can — in the neighboring lake, or wood, or in the house, under the shape of a household animal.” — 1:556
see: Abbé Brasseur de Bourbourg, Histoire des Nations Civilisées du Mexique, 1858: “Sous le nom de ‘Texoxé’ on désignait les naguals, les génies mauvais de toute espèce, ainsi que les sorciers; ceux-ci avaient le pouvoir de prendre toutes sortes de formes [The Naguals were designated by the name ‘Texoxé,’ evil genii of every kind, as well as sorcerers; these had the power to take on all kinds of forms] . . .” — 2:113

— Footnotes

the ram-headed Ammon . . . on the potter’s wheel
see: Sydney Herbert, Egyptian Art and Its Influence, 1884: “One Egyptian representation of Ammon is very singular; it pourtrays Pthah, ‘the Creator,’ decked with ram’s-horns, seated at the potter’s wheel, and moulding and turning the clay to fashion mortals out of . . .” — p. 13
Egyptian Pthah — p. 21 (fig. 19)

— 214 —

Arjuna . . . descended into Pâtâla . . . married Ulûpi . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “The race of Nāgas is said to . . . [reign in] Pātāla, or the regions below the earth . . .” — p. 213
      “ULŪPĪ.  A daughter of Kauravya, Rāja of the Nāgas, with whom Arjuna contracted a kind of marriage.” — p. 325
the serpent emblem . . . ΕΙΛΑΜ ΑΒΡΑΣΑΞ . . .
see: C. W. King, Gnostics and Their Remains, 1887: “. . . [the emblem] inscribed with . . . ΑΒΡΑΣΑΞ . . . and often accompanied with invocations such as, ΣΕΜΕΣ ΕΙΛΑΜ, ‘The Eternal Sun’ . . .” — p. 246
Figure 4plate a, fig. 4 (facing p. 434)
                    Figure 5plate f, fig. 5 (facing p. 439)
ΚΕΜΕΚ ΕΙΛΑΜ ΑΒΡΑΣΑΞ (“the eternal Sun-Abrasax”)
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Around the Iao, runs the legend, ϹΕΜΕϹ ΕΙΛΑΜ ΑΒΡΑΣΑΞ, ‘The eternal Sun-Abrasax’ (the Central Spiritual Sun of all the kabalists, represented in some diagrams of the latter by the circle of Tiphereth).” — 2:293
see: C. W. King, Antique Gems, 1860: “[ϹΕΜΕϹ] . . . exhibiting the lunar-shaped sigma, Ϲ . . .” — p. 232
      “A common inscription . . . is the Hebrew-Greek, ϹΕΜΕϹ ΕΙΛΑΜ, ‘the eternal sun’ . . .” — p. 344
the central spiritual sun . . . circle of Tiphereth
see: Kabbalah Unveiled, tr. S. L. MacGregor Mathers, 1887: “. . . ‘splendour of the sun, who is’ . . . refers to the sixth Sephira, Tiphereth, or beauty; the splendour of the countenance of Microsprosopus . . .” — p. 148 fn.
see: “The Religion of Freemasonry, Illuminated by the Kabbalah,” Sept. 8, 1887: “. . . a circle, bearing a central point, is purely Kabbalistic.  The point is Tiphereth . . .” — p. 58 (Ars Quatuor Coronatorum, v. 1)
“From this region of unfathomable depth . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “From this region of unfathomable Depth, issues forth a circle formed of spirals; which, in the language of symbolism, means a grand cycle, κύκλος, composed of smaller ones.  Coiled within, so as to follow the spirals, lies the serpent — emblem of wisdom and eternity — the Dual Androgyne: the cycle representing Ennoia or the Divine mind, and the Serpent — the Agathodaimon, Ophis — the Shadow of the Light.  Both were the Logoï of the Ophites; or the unity as Logos manifesting itself as a double principle of good and evil . . .” — 2:293
shadow is not evil, but . . . completes Light or Good . . .
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The Qabbalah does not recognize in the Good and Evil, two independent, autonomatic, opposing powers, but both are . . . under the power of the Supreme Absolute Deity. . . . The German philosopher Hegel, holds that a thing can only exist through its opposite, that the thing and its opposite must arise together, and that eternally, as the complements of a unity . . .” — p. 184
This symbol accounts for the adoration by this sect of the Serpent . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “This symbol accounts for the adoration by this sect of the Serpent, as the Saviour, coiled either around the Sacramental loaf or a Tau.  As a unity, Ennoia and Ophis are the Logos . . .” — 2:293

— Footnotes

“Mahabhârata,” Adiparva, Sloka, 7788, 7789.
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Ulūpī was daughter of the nāga Kauravya, according to the authority of the Mahābhārata, Ādi-parvan, śl. 7788, 7789.” — 4:160 fn. (iv.20)
The “Bhagavata Purâna” . . . as explained by Sridhera . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “The Bhāgavata-purāna, IX., XX., 31 . . . as the passage is explained by the commentator, Śrīdhara, — makes Ulūpī daughter of the king of Maṇipūra.” — 4:160 fn. (iv.20)

— 214-15 —

When separated, one is the Tree of Life (spiritual) . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “. . . when separated, one is the Tree of Life (Spiritual); the other, the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil.  Therefore, we find Ophis urging the first human couple — the material production of Ilda-Baoth, but which owed its spiritual principle to Sophia-Achamoth — to eat of the forbidden fruit, although Ophis represents Divine Wisdom.” — 2:293

— 215 —

The serpent, the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The Serpent, the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, and the Tree of Life, are all symbols transplanted from the soil of India.  The Arasa-Maram, the banyan tree, so sacred with the Hindus, since Vishnu, during one of his incarnations, reposed under its mighty shade, and there taught humanity philosophy and sciences, is called the Tree of Knowledge and the Tree of Life.  Under the protective umbrage of this king of the forests, the Gurus teach their pupils their first lessons on immortality and initiate them in the mysteries of life and death.  The Java-Aleim of the Sacerdotal College are said, in the Chaldean tradition, to have taught the sons of men to become like one of them.” — 2:293
Arasa-Maram, the banyan tree, so sacred with the Hindus . . .
see: Edward Balfour, Cyclopædia of India, 1885: “FICUS RELIGIOSA. . . . Arasa Maram [Tamil] . . . held in veneration by the Hindus, because the god Vishnu is fabled to have been born under its branches.” — 1:1101
see: Richard Folkard, Plant Lore, Legends, and Lyrics, 1884: “The Chinese Buddhists represent that Buddha sits under a Banyan-tree . . . Like the sacred Bo-tree, the Banyan is regarded not only as the Tree of Knowledge, but also as the tree of Indian seers and ascetic devotees.” — p. 241
To the present day Foh-tchou, who lives in his Foh-Maeyu . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “To the present day Foh-tchou, who lives in his Foh-Maëyu, or temple of Buddha, on the top of ‘Kouin-long-sang’ {This mountain is situated south-west of China, almost between China and Thibet}, the great mountain, produces his greatest religious miracles under a tree called in Chinese Sung-Ming-Shŭ, or the Tree of Knowledge and the Tree of Life, for ignorance is death, and knowledge alone gives immortality.  This marvellous display takes place every three years, when an immense concourse of Chinese Buddhists assemble in pilgrimage at the holy place.” — 2:293-4 & fn.
“Kouin-long-sang,” the great mountain . . . Tree of Life . . . immortality
see: S. Baring Gould, “Yule Log and Christmas Tree,” Dec. 1889: “In the enchanted gardens of the Chinese, on the summit of the Kuan-lun, the fountain of immortality breaks forth, and life eternal is obtained by eating of the Tree of Life, which is in the midst of the garden.” — pp. 650-1 (Newberry House Magazine, v. 1)
the “Serpent” was . . . the Logos . . . divine creative wisdom
see: Godfrey Higgins, Anacalypsis, 1836: “. . . the serpent . . . is made by the Ophites, the emblem of the Creator . . .”  “The Ophites are said to have maintained, that the serpent of Genesis was the Λογος . . . The Logos was divine wisdom . . .” — 1:521, 523

— Footnotes [215-16]

Foh-Tchou . . . teacher of the doctrines of Buddha-Foh
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Foh-Tchou, literally, in Chinese, meaning Buddha’s lord, or the teacher of the doctrines of Buddha — Foh.” — 2:293 fn.
see: George Carter Stent, Chinese and English Vocabulary, 1871:
fo . . . . . . .  Buddha.
  fo-chiao . . . the doctrine of Buddha. . . .
  fu-tzū . . . . .  a sage, a teacher . . .” — pp. 135-6
“Metatron united to Shekinah” . . . representing the Logos . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Dans le Zohar et dans tous les livres de l’antique et fidèle kabbale, on affirme même que dans l’arbre de la connaissance on retrouve encore le bon ange représentant le Verbe {le Zohar le définit ‘Metatron uni à Schekinah’} [In the Zohar and in all the books of the ancient and true Qabbalah, it is even maintained that in the tree of knowledge we still find the good angel representing the Logos {the Zohar defines it as ‘Metatron united with Shekīnāh’}] . . .” — 2:383 & fn.
while Shamael . . . occupies only the rind of that tree . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . pendant que Sammael occupe seulement les écorces du même arbre et possède la connaissance du mauvais [while Samael only occupies the bark of the same tree and possesses the knowledge of evil].” — 2:383

— 216 —

the Cross . . . “tree and serpent” . . . the salvation of mankind
see: Otto Zoeckler, The Cross of Christ, 1877: “More clearly . . . do we find the meaning of the pre-Christian cross . . . expressed in the mysterious type of the serpent, raised by Moses upon a pole in the wilderness . . . the serpent and tree worship of the Egyptians, must without doubt be admitted; although Moses caused it to be raised . . . as a symbol of salvation . . .” — p. 78
“From the possession of . . . the Androgyne condition . . .”
see: H. P. Blavatsky, “Notes sur l’Ésotérisme du Dogme Chrétien,” Dec. 1887: “Ce crime effroyable n’était que le résultat naturel de la loi de l’évolution; ce sont les races, à peine consolidées d’abord, de nos prototypes androgynes et semi-éthérées se matérialisant peu à peu, prenant un corps physique, puis se scindant en mâles et femelles distincts et, finalement, procréant charnellement [This horrible crime was nothing but the natural result of the law of evolution; these are the races, at first barely solidified, of our androgynous and semi-ethereal prototypes, materializing themselves little by little, taking on a physical body, then dividing themselves into distinct males and females, and finally reproducing carnally] . . .” — p. 169 (Le Lotus)
“The curse was this . . .” (VideCross and Circle,” Part II.)
see: “The ‘Curse’ from a Philosophical Point of View”: “The curse was not brought on mankind by the Fourth Race . . . Nor was the curse of Karma called down upon them for seeking natural union . . . but, for abusing the creative power, for desecrating the divine gift, and wasting the life-essence for no purpose except bestial personal gratification.” — SD 2:410
Matronethah . . . “is the way to the great Tree of Life . . .”
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “The Matroneethah is The Mediatrix between The Deity and Man. . . . ‘Where is the way to the Tree of Life?  This is the great Matroneethah, she is the way to that Great Tree, the Mighty Tree of Life.’ ” — p. 349
This Tree reaches the heavenly vale . . .
p/q: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “ ‘This Tree goes up to the heavenly clouds and it is hidden between three mountains.  From under the three mountains, the Tree goes out and ascends to the Above and comes down to the Below. . . . This Tree is revealed in the daytime and covered (hidden) in the night.’ {Zohar i, 172a and b, Brody Ed.}” — p. 385 & fn.

— Footnotes

Lacour, who saw in the scene of the Fall . . .
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . M. Lacour, qui ne voit dans tout ce chapitre II qu’une scène d’initiation égyptienne . . . ‘L’arbre de la divination ou de la connaissance bonne et mauvaise . . . C’est la science de Tzyphon, le génie enseignant le doute, de Tzy enseigner et de Phon le doute.  Tzyphon est un des aleim; nous le verrons bientôt sous le nom de Néch, le tentateur’ {Les Œloim, t. II, p. 218} [Lacour, who sees in this chapter II only an Egyptian initiation scene . . . ‘The tree of divination, or of the knowledge of good and evil . . . It is the science of Tzyphon, the genie which teaches doubt, from Tzy to teach and Phon doubt.  Tzyphon is one of the elohim; we shall see him soon under the name of Nech, the tempter’].” — 2:383 & fn.

— 216-17 —

the ‘Tree of Life’ was the ansated cross in its sexual aspect . . .”
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “The Ansated Cross of the Egyptians . . . was made to co-ordinate with the idea of the origin of human life . . . and hence the phallic form.” — p. v

— 217 —

“the ‘Tree of Knowledge’ was the separation and the coming together . . .”
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “The Hebrew values for 7 [female number] and 9 [male number] are characteristic of the letters צ and ע.  Put them together, and there results עצ, or ots, or the word for the tree in the garden.  But, as by the division, it is two trees twisted or bound in one . . .” — p. 200
“the values of the letters composing the word Otz ( עצ ) . . .”
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “But 7 and 9 are the characteristic values of עצ, or ots, the tree of the Garden, the twining together of the two parts [male & female] of which indicates the . . . consummation of marriage . . .” — p. 289
“the seven being the holy feminine number and the nine . . . male energy”
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1894: “The tree was o-tz, or 7 and 9, as to which 7 is a female number, and 9 a male number . . .” — p. 59 (Supplement)
“This ansated cross is the symbol of the Egyptian female-male . . .”
see: J. Ralston Skinner, The Source of Measures, 1875: “. . . the ansated cross of the Egyptians, with its obvious meaning of the origin of measures. . . . this kind of measure was made to co-ordinate with the idea of the . . . hermaphrodite . . .” — p. 50
the more philosophical Eastern or Aryan views upon this subject
see: “The Mysteries of the Hebdomad”: “Esoteric philosophy explains that four is the symbol of the Universe in its potential state, or chaotic matter, and that it requires Spirit to permeate it actively, i.e., the primordial abstract triangle has to quit its one dimensional quality and spread across that matter, thus forming a manifested basis on the three dimensional space, in order that the Universe should manifest intelligibly.” — SD 2:600 fn.
“It would have indeed been a bold step for anyone . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “It would have been a bold step indeed for anyone, some thirty years ago, to have thought of treating the public to a collection of stories ordinarily reputed fabulous, and of claiming for them the consideration due to genuine realities, or to have advocated tales, time-honoured as fictions, as actual facts; and those of the nursery as being, in many instances, legends, more or less distorted, descriptive of real beings or events.  Now-a-days it is a less hazardous proceeding.” — p. 1

— 217-18 —

“Many of the so-called mythical animals . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “. . . many of the so-called mythical animals, which throughout long ages and in all nations have been the fertile subjects of fiction and fable, come legitimately within the scope of plain matter-of-fact Natural History, and that they may be considered, not as the outcome of exuberant fancy, but as creatures which really once existed, and of which, unfortunately, only imperfect and inaccurate descriptions have filtered down to us, probably very much refracted, through the mists of time.” — p. 2

— 218 —

“Traditions of creatures once co-existing with man . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “I propose to follow . . . traditions of creatures once co-existing with man, some of which are so weird and terrible as to appear at first sight to be impossible. . . . For me the major part of those creatures are not chimeras but objects of rational study.  The dragon, in place of being a creature evolved out of the imagination of Aryan man by the contemplation of lightning flashing through the caverns which he tenanted, as is held by some mythologists, is an animal which once lived and dragged its ponderous coils, and perhaps flew . . .” — p. 2
“To me the specific existence of the Unicorn . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “To me the specific existence of the unicorn seems not incredible, and, in fact, more probable than that theory which assigns its origin to a lunar myth {‘Thus we find . . . the solar lion and the lunar unicorn . . .’ — The Unicorn; a Mythological Investigation.  Robert Brown, jun., F.S.A.  London, 1881}.” — p. 3 & fn.
“For my part I doubt the general derivation of myths . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “I must admit that, for my part, I doubt the general derivation of myths from ‘the contemplation of the visible workings of external nature.’  It seems to me easier to suppose that the palsy of time has enfeebled the utterance of these oft-told tales until their original appearance is almost unrecognisable, than that uncultured savages should possess powers of imagination and poetical invention far beyond those enjoyed by the most instructed nations of the present day; less hard to believe that these wonderful stories of gods and demigods, of giants and dwarfs, of dragons and monsters of all descriptions, are transformations than to believe them to be inventions.” — p. 4
man, “successively traced to . . . one million years . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “. . . the researches of palæontologists have successively traced back the existence of man to periods variously estimated at from thirty thousand to one million years — to periods when he co-existed with animals which have long since become extinct . . .” — p. 20
“Of the genus Cidastes . . . attained a length of nearly two hundred feet
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “. . . notice the specimens of the genus Cidastes . . . whose huge bones and almost incredible number of vertebræ show them to have attained a length of nearly two hundred feet.  The remains of no less than ten of these monsters were seen by Professor Mudge, while riding through the Mauvaise Terres of Colorado, strewn upon the plains . . .” — p. 36
The Titanosaurus montanus, reaching fifty or sixty feet in length . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “The Titanosaurus montanus, believed to have been herbivorous, is estimated to have reached fifty or sixty feet in length; while other Dinosaurians of still more gigantic proportions, from the Jurassic beds of the Rocky Mountains, have been described by Professor Marsh.  Among the discovered remains of Atlantosaurus immanis is a femur over six feet in length, and it is estimated . . . that this species . . . would have been over one hundred feet in length.  But even yet the limit has not been reached, and we hear of the discovery of the remains of another form, of such Titanic proportions as to possess a thigh-bone over twelve feet in length.” — pp. 36-7
the monstrous Sivatherium in the Himalayas, the four-horned stag . . .
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Sivatherium (restored) from the Upper Miocene deposits of the Siwalik Hills.” — p. 39
Sivatherium
      “. . . the gigantic Sivatherium . . . a four-horned stag, which had the bulk of an elephant, and exceeded it in height.” — p. 41
the gigantic Megatherium
see: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “. . . the Megatherium, which appears to have been created to burrow in the earth . . . was as large as an elephant . . .” — pp. 40-1

— 218-19 —

of colossal flying lizards, Pterodactyli . . .
see: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Are the composite creatures of Chaldæan mythology so very much more wonderful than . . . the duck-billed platypus, and the flying lizard of Malaysia which are, or the pterodactylus . . . and archæopteryx which have been?  Does not geological science . . . carry the proofs of the existence of man constantly further and further back into remote time, and disclose the previous existence of intermediate types . . . of reptile-like birds and bird-like reptiles?” — pp. 18-19

— 219 —

man . . . “contemporaneous with the earliest mammalia . . .”
p/q: A. de Quatrefages, The Human Species, 1879: “. . . as far as his body is concerned, man is a mammal. . . . He may then have been contemporaneous with the earliest mammalia, and go back as far as the secondary period.” — p. 152
“It appears . . . that the flying dragons of romance . . .”
p/q: J. B. Jukes, School Manual of Geology, 1863: “It thus appears that even the flying dragons of romance have had something like a real existence in former ages of the world.” — p. 270
“Does the written history of man . . . comprising a few thousand years . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “Does the written history of man, comprising a few thousand years, embrace the whole course of his intelligent existence?  or have we in the long mythical eras, extending over hundreds of thousands of years and recorded in the chronologies of Chaldæa and of China, shadowy mementoes of pre-historic man, handed down by tradition, and perhaps transported by a few survivors to existing lands from others which, like the fabled (?) Atlantis of Plato, may have been submerged, or the scene of some great catastrophe which destroyed them with all their civilization.” — p. 19
the remains of a pigmy elephant were found (E. Falconeri) . . .
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “. . . the pigmy elephant (E. Falconeri) whose remains have been found in the cave-deposits of Malta, associated with those of pigmy hippopotami . . . which was only two feet six inches high; or the still existing Hippopotamus (Chœropsis) liberiensis, which M. Milne Edwardes {Recherches, &c. des Mammiferes, plate 1} figures as little more than two feet in height.” — p. 16
the Chinese philosopher Chuang . . . “the things that men do know . . .”
p/q: Charles Gould, Mythical Monsters, 1886: “It has been said by the philosopher Chuang that ‘the things that men do know can in no way be compared, numerically speaking, to the things that are unknown’ . . .” — p. 384 (Original Preface to Shan Hai King, “Wonders by Land and Sea”)

— 220 —

“Tradition says, and the records of the Great Book . . . explain . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Tradition says, and the records of the Great Book explain, that long before the days of Ad-am, and his inquisitive wife, He-va, where now are found but salt lakes and desolate barren deserts, there was a vast inland sea, which extended over Middle Asia, north of the proud Himalayan range, and its western prolongation.  An island, which for its unparalleled beauty had no rival in the world, was inhabited by the last remnant of the race which preceded ours.” — 1:589
“This race could live with equal ease in water, air, or fire . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “This race could live with equal ease in water, air, or fire, for it had an unlimited control over the elements.  These were the ‘Sons of God’; not those who saw the daughters of men, but the real Elohim, though in the Oriental Kabala they have another name.  It was they who imparted Nature’s most weird secrets to men, and revealed to them the ineffable, and now lost ‘word.’ ” — 1:589
“This word, which is no word, has travelled once round the globe . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “This word, which is no word, has travelled once around the globe, and still lingers as a far-off dying echo in the hearts of some privileged men.  The hierophants of all the Sacerdotal Colleges were aware of the existence of this island, but the ‘word’ was known only to the Java Aleim, or chief lord of every college, and was passed to his successor only at the moment of death.  There were many such colleges, and the old classic authors speak of them.” — 1:590
“There was no communication with the fair island by sea . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “There was no communication with the fair island by sea, but subterranean passages known only to the chiefs, communicated with it in all directions.  Tradition points to many of the majestic ruins of India, Ellora, Elephanta, and the caverns of Ajunta (Chandor range), which belonged once to those colleges, and with which were connected such subterranean ways.” — 1:590

— Footnotes

There are archæologists, who, like Mr. James Fergusson . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “There are archæologists, who, like Mr. James Fergusson, deny the great antiquity of even one single monument in India.  In his work, ‘Illustrations of the Rock-Cut Temples of India,’ the author ventures to express the very extraordinary opinion that ‘Egypt had ceased to be a nation before the earliest of the cave-temples of India was excavated.’ ” — 1:590 fn.
see: James Fergusson, Illustrations of the Rock Cut Temples of India, 1845: “. . . Egypt had ceased to be a Nation before the earliest of the cave temples of India was excavated . . . there is nothing on the banks of the Nile which does not belong to a different and far more ancient epoch than anything in India.” — p. 1
In short, he does not admit the existence of any cave . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “In short, he does not admit the existence of any cave anterior to the reign of Asoka, and seems willing to prove that most of these rock-cut temples were executed from the time of that pious Buddhist king, till the destruction of the Andhra dynasty of Maghada, in the beginning of the fifth century.  We believe such a claim perfectly arbitrary.  Further discoveries are sure to show how erroneous and unwarranted it was.” — 1:590-1 fn.
see: James Fergusson, Illustrations of the Rock Cut Temples of India, 1845: “. . . from the time of Asoka till the destruction of the Andhra dynasty of Magadha in the beginning of the fifth century, Buddhism was the principal religion in the north of India . . . With regard to the antiquity of the monuments . . . the oldest relics of whose existence I am aware are the Laths, bearing the inscriptions of Asoka, dating from the middle of the third century b.c.  I am not aware of the existence of any cave anterior to, or even coeval with these . . .” — p. 4

— 221 —

Ellora, Elephanta, Karli, and Ajunta . . . subterranean labyrinths
see: George Hartwig, Marvels Under Our Feet: From ‘The Subterranean World’, 1888: “The rock-temples of Kanara are rivalled by those of Elephanta, Karli, and Ajunta, and far surpassed in magnificence and extent by the excavations of Ellora . . . where a whole mountain of hard red granite has been hollowed out into an immense range of highly ornamented grottoes and temples . . .” — pp. 71-2
“Who can tell that the lost Atlantis . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “Who can tell but the lost Atlantis — which is also mentioned in the Secret Book, but, again, under another name, pronounced in the sacred language — did not exist yet in those days?” — 1:590-1
“The great lost continent might have . . . been . . . south of Asia . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The great lost continent might have, perhaps, been situated south of Asia, extending from India to Tasmania? {It is a strange coincidence that when first discovered, America was found to bear among some native tribes the name of Atlanta}.” — 1:591 & fn.
“If the hypothesis . . . is ever verified . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “If the hypothesis now so much doubted, and positively denied by some learned authors who regard it as a joke of Plato’s, is ever verified, then, perhaps, will the scientists believe that the description of the god-inhabited continent was not altogether fable.  And they may then perceive that Plato’s guarded hints and the fact of his attributing the narrative to Solon and the Egyptian priests, were but a prudent way of imparting the fact to the world and by cleverly combining truth and fiction, to disconnect himself from a story which the obligations imposed at initiation forbade him to divulge.” — 1:591
“To continue the tradition . . . the class of hierophants was divided . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “To continue the tradition, we have to add that the class of hierophants was divided into two distinct categories: those who were instructed by the ‘Sons of God,’ of the island, and who were initiated in the divine doctrine of pure revelation, and others who inhabited the lost Atlantis — if such must be its name — and who, being of another race, were born with a sight which embraced all hidden things, and was independent of both distance and material obstacle.  In short, they were the fourth race of men mentioned in the Popol-Vuh, whose sight was unlimited, and who knew all things at once.” — 1:592-3
see: Max Müller, Chips from a German Workshop, 1867-75: “Four men are mentioned as the real ancestors of the human race . . . their creation was a wonder wrought by the Creator.  They could reason and speak, their sight was unlimited, and they knew all things at once.” — 1:336-7 (“Extracts from the ‘Popol Vuh’ ”)

— Footnotes

power of Dugpaship
see: H. P. Blavatsky, “Occultism Versus the Occult Arts,” May 15, 1888: “Sensual, or even mental self-gratification, involves the immediate loss of the powers of spiritual discernment; the voice of the master can no longer be distinguished from that of one’s passions or even that of a Dugpa [black magician] . . . the results even of involuntary, unconscious sorcery cannot fail to be productive of bad, Karma.”  “For such . . . the golden gate of Wisdom may get transformed into the wide gate and the broad way ‘that leadeth unto destruction’ . . . This is the Gate of the Occult arts, practised for selfish motives . . . It can lead only to Dugpa-ship . . .” — pp. 180, 181 (Lucifer, v. 2)

— 222 —

a dynasty of Spirit-Kings, not of Manes, or “ghosts,” as some believe
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Dynastie des mânes . . . toute une dynastie de mânes, c’est-à-dire d’ombres et de fantômes [Dynasty of manes (ghosts) . . . a whole dynasty of manes, that is, of shades and phantoms].” — 3:57-8
“In consequence of this, war was declared . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “In consequence of this, war was declared, the story of which would be too long to narrate; its substance may be found in the disfigured allegories of the race of Cain, the giants, and that of Noah and his righteous family.  The conflict came to an end by the submersion of the Atlantis; which finds its imitation in the stories of the Babylonian and Mosaic flood.  The giants and magicians ‘. . . and all flesh died . . . and every man.’ ” — 1:593
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And all flesh died that moved upon the earth . . . and every man . . . and Noah [and his family] only remained alive . . .” — p. 9 (Genesis, 7:21, 23)
“All except Xisuthrus and Noah . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “All except Xisuthrus and Noah, who are substantially identical with the great Father of the Thlinkithians in the Popol-Vuh, or the sacred book of the Guatemaleans, which also tells of his escaping in a large boat, like the Hindu Noah — Vaiswasvata.” — 1:593
see: George Smith, Chaldean Account of Genesis, 1876: “ ‘. . . Xisuthrus . . . The deity Cronos appeared to him in a vision, and warned him that . . . there would be a flood, by which mankind would be destroyed.  He therefore enjoined him . . . to build a vessel, and take with him into it his friends and relations . . . together with all the different animals . . .’ ” — pp. 42-3
the Thlinkithians . . . escaping in a large boat
see: Max Müller, Chips from a German Workshop, 1867: “The Thlinkithians are one of the four principal races inhabiting Russian America. . . . These Thlinkithians believe in a general flood or deluge, and that men saved themselves in a large floating building.” — 1:338 (ch. 14, “Popol-Vuh”)
like the Hindu Noah — Vaivasvata
see: Edward Balfour, Cyclopædia of India, 1885: “Manu Vaivasvata . . . is represented as conciliating the favour of the Supreme Being by his piety in an age of universal depravity.  He is noticed in the Satapatha Brahmana, which contains an important legend of the deluge, of which he was warned by a fish, and told to build a ship, which the fish guided.  Manu alone was saved . . .” — 2:854
“If we believe the tradition at all . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “If we believe the tradition at all, we have to credit the further story that from the intermarrying of the progeny of the hierophants of the island and the descendants of the Atlantian Noah, sprang up a mixed race of righteous and wicked.  On the one side the world had its Enochs, Moseses, Gautama-Buddhas, its numerous ‘Saviours,’ and great hierophants; on the other hand, its ‘natural magicians’ who, through lack of the restraining power of proper spiritual enlightenment . . . perverted their gifts to evil purposes.” — 1:593
In the “Histoire des Vierges . . .”
see: Louis Jacolliot, Histoire des Vierges: Les Peuples et les Continents Disparus, 1874 [what follows are passages quoted from Isis Unveiled, originally translated from the French text].
“One of the most ancient legends of India . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘One of the most ancient legends of India, preserved in the temples by oral and written tradition, relates that several hundred thousand years ago there existed in the Pacific Ocean, an immense continent which was destroyed by geological upheaval, and the fragments of which must be sought in Madagascar, Ceylon, Sumatra, Java, Borneo, and the principal isles of Polynesia.’ ” — 1:594 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, p. 13]
“The high plateau of Hindustan and Asia . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘The high plateaux of Hindustan and Asia, according to this hypothesis, would only have been represented in those distant epochs by great islands contiguous to the central continent. . . . According to the Brahmans, this country had attained a high civilization, and the peninsula of Hindustan, enlarged by the displacement of the waters, at the time of the grand cataclysm, has but continued the chain of the primitive traditions born in this place.  These traditions give the name of Rutas to the peoples which inhabited this immense equinoctial continent, and from their speech was derived the Sanscrit.’ ” — 1:594 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, pp. 13-14]
“And the Indo-Hellenic tradition . . . relates the existence of a continent . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘The Indo-Hellenic tradition, preserved by the most intelligent population which emigrated from the plains of India, equally relates the existence of a continent and a people to which it gives the name of Atlantis and Atlantides, and which it locates in the Atlantic in the northern portion of the Tropics.’ ” — 1:594 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, p. 14]

— 222-3 —

“Apart from this fact, the supposition of an ancient continent . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘Apart from the fact that the supposition of an ancient continent in those latitudes, the vestiges of which may be found in the volcanic islands and mountainous surface of the Azores, the Canaries and Cape Verd, is not devoid of geographical probability . . .’ ” — 1:594 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, p. 14]

— 223 —

“The Greeks, who, moreover, never dared to pass . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘. . . the Greeks, who, moreover, never dared to pass beyond the pillars of Hercules, on account of their dread of the mysterious ocean, appeared too late in antiquity for the stories preserved by Plato to be anything else than an echo of the Indian legend.  Moreover, when we cast a look on a planisphere, at the sight of the islands and islets strewn from the Malayan Archipelago to Polynesia, from the straits of Sund to Easter Island, it is impossible, upon the hypothesis of continents preceding those which we inhabit, not to place there the most important of all.’ ” — 1:594 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, pp. 14-15]
“A religious belief, common to Malacca and Polynesia . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘A religious belief, common to Malacca and Polynesia, that is to say to the two opposite extremes of the Oceanic world, affirms “that all these islands once formed two immense countries, inhabited by yellow men and black men, always at war; and that the gods, wearied with their quarrels, having charged Ocean to pacify them, the latter swallowed up the two continents, and since, it had been impossible to make him give up his captives.  Alone, the mountain-peaks and high plateaux escaped the flood, by the power of the gods, who perceived too late the mistake they had committed.” ’ ” — 1:594 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, p. 15]
“Whatever there may be in these traditions . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘Whatever there may be in these traditions, and whatever may have been the place where a civilization more ancient than that of Rome, of Greece, of Egypt, and of India was developed, it is certain that this civilization did exist, and that it is highly important to science to recover its traces, however feeble and fugitive they may be’ (pp. 13-15).” — 1:595 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, p. 15]
This last tradition corroborates the one given . . .
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “This last tradition, translated by Louis Jacolliot from the Sanscrit manuscripts, corroborates the one we have given from the ‘Records of the Secret Doctrine.’  The war mentioned between the yellow and the black men, relates to a struggle between the ‘sons of God’ and the ‘sons of giants,’ or the inhabitants and magicians of the Atlantis.” — 1:595 fn.
The final conclusion . . . “As to the Polynesian continent . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “The final conclusion of M. Jacolliot, who visited personally all the islands of Polynesia, and devoted years to the study of the religion, language, and traditions of nearly all the peoples, is as follows:
‘As to the Polynesian continent which disappeared at the time of the final geological cataclysms, its existence rests on such proofs that to be logical we can doubt no longer.’ ” — 1:595 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, p. 307]
“The three summits of this continent . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘The three summits of this continent, Sandwich Islands, New Zealand, Easter Island, are distant from each other from fifteen to eighteen hundred leagues, and the groups of intermediate islands, Viti, Samoa, Tonga, Foutouna, Ouvea, Marquesas, Tahiti, Poumouton, Gambiers, are themselves distant from these extreme points from seven or eight hundred to one thousand leagues.’ ” — 1:595 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, p. 307]
“All navigators agree in saying . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘All navigators agree in saying that the extreme and the central groups could never have communicated in view of their actual geographical position, and with the insufficient means they had at hand.  It is physically impossible to cross such distances in a pirogue [canoe] . . . without a compass, and travel months without provisions.’ ” — 1:595 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, pp. 307-8]
“On the other hand, the aborigines of the Sandwich Islands . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘On the other hand, the aborigines of the Sandwich Islands, of Viti, of New Zealand, of the central groups, of Samoa, Tahiti, etc., had never known each other, had never heard of each other before the arrival of the Europeans.’ ” — 1:595 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, p. 308]

— 223-4 —

And yet each of these people maintained . . .”
p/q: H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877: “ ‘And yet, each of these people maintained that their island had at one time formed part of an immense stretch of land which extended toward the West, on the side of Asia.  And all, brought together, were found to speak the same language, to have the same usages, the same customs, the same religious belief.  And all to the question, “Where is the cradle of your race?” for sole response, extended their hand toward the setting sun’ (Ibid., p. 308).” — 1:595 fn. [Histoire des Vierges, p. 308]

— 224 —

the Atlanteans (the Daityas and “Atalantians”)
see: Josiah Priest, American Antiquities, 1833: “The Atlantes . . . came to America soon after the flood, if not before, colonised and named the ocean and the islands in it, as well as America, which was called . . . atala meaning the first or main land.  This name is preserved in Hindu traditions.  The Atlantes . . . were the most conspicuous and civilized.  Their true name was Atalans.” — p. 312
colossal statues . . . near Bamian . . . portrait-statues
see: Les Statues Colossales de Bamian,” Feb. 14, 1887: “L’étude de la statue colossale de Bamian fait clairement ressortir son caractère bouddhique.  La coiffure, la disposition des draperies, les longues oreilles, ne peuvent laisser de doutes à cet égard [Studying the colossal statue of Bamian shows clearly its Buddha-like character.  The style of hair, the arrangement of the garments, the long ears, leave no doubts in this regard].” — p. 289 (Le Cosmos, v. 6)
wicked . . . as Ravana, the giant King of Lanka . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “RĀVAṆA.  The demon king of Lankā or Ceylon . . . All Rākshasas are malignant and terrible, but Rāvaṇa as their chief attained the utmost degree of wickedness . . . ‘His form was as a thick cloud . . . Tall as a mountain peak, he stopped with his arms the sun and moon in their course, and prevented their rising.’ ” — p. 264
Ravana . . . the brother of Kumbhakarna
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “KUMBHA-KARṆA. . . . full brother of Rāvaṇa.  A monster who . . . slept for six months at a time and remained awake for only a single day.” — p. 170
“Titan and his enormous brood” . . . “heaven’s first born”
p/q: John Milton, Paradise Lost, 1803:
“Th’ Ionian Gods . . . Heaven and Earth,
  Their boasted parents: Titan Heav’n’s first-born,
  With his enormous brood . . .” — p. 22 (I, 508-11)
“The traditions of Southern India uniformly ascribing its civilization . . .”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . the traditions of the south of India uniformly ascribe its civilization . . . and the settlement of civilized Hindus, to the conquest of Lankā by Rāma.” — 3:317-18 fn.

— 225 —

favourite theories . . . that writing was not known in India
see: Albrecht Weber, The History of Indian Literature, 1882: “. . . preservation by means of writing is not to be thought of for this period.”  “The oldest inscriptions, according to Wilson, date no earlier than the third century b.c.” — pp. 10, 15 fn.
see: Max Müller, History of Ancient Sanskrit Literature, 1860: “I maintain that there is not a single word in Pāṇini’s terminology which presupposes the existence of writing.” — p. 507
and their architecture . . . from the Macedonian Greeks
see: Rājendralāla Mitra, Indo-Aryans, 1881: “ ‘Mr. Fergusson holds that so far as we have any remains of early stone architecture in India, it dates from after B.C. 330 — the Macedonian invasion.’ ” — 1:49

— Footnotes

the “unrighteous but valiant monarch” (Purusha) of the Daityas . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “This prince was, in a former existence, the unrighteous but valiant monarch {Purusha} of the Daityas, Hiraṇyakaśipu, who was killed by the divine guardian of creation, (in the man-lion Avatāra).  He was, next, the ten-headed (sovereign, Rāvaṇa), whose . . . strength and power were overcome by the lord of the three worlds, (Rāma).” — 4:104 & fn. (iv.14)
he is reborn as Sisupala, the son of . . . Damaghosha . . .
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ŚIŚU-PĀLA.  Son of Dama-ghosha . . . He was slain by Kṛishṇa . . . The Vishṇu Purāṇa contributes an additional legend about him.  ‘. . . In this [reborn] character he renewed . . . his hostile hatred towards Puṇḍarīkāksha (Vishṇu) . . . and was in consequence slain by him.’ ” — p. 294
      “Kṛishṇa has many appellations . . . and there are many which apply both to the full deity, Vishnu, and his incarnation, Kṛishṇa.” — p. 168

— 226 —

Ea, the god of Wisdom . . . the Oannes of Berosus
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “. . . it is certain that Oannês and Ea are one and the same.  Ea . . . was the culture-god of primitive Babylonia, the god of wisdom, the instructor of his worshippers in arts and science.” — p. 133
the half-man, half-fish, who taught . . . the art of writing
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “Bêrôssos, the Chaldæan historian . . . [reported] ‘In the first year there appeared . . . a creature endowed with reason, by the name Oannes, whose whole body . . . was that of a fish . . . This being was accustomed to pass the day among men . . . and he gave them an insight into letters and sciences and arts of every kind.’ ”  “Ea was, moreover, like Oannês, represented as partly man and partly fish.” — pp. 131, 133
“. . . Eridu, which stood 6,000 years ago . . .”
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “. . . Eridu, the city stood at the mouth of the Euphrates and on the edge of the Persian Gulf. . . . the date would more probably be about 4000 B.C.” — p. 135
“The name means ‘the good city,’ a particulary holy spot . . .”
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “Eridu is a contracted form of the older Eri-duga, or ‘good city’ . . . The place was thus a peculiarly holy spot . . . There must have been a time when Eridu held a foremost rank among the cities of Babylonia, and when it was the centre from which the ancient culture and civilisation of the country made its way.” — pp. 134-5
“As the culture-god . . . from the sea . . . foreign importation”
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “It is as a sea deity that Oannês is the culture-hero of the Chaldæans . . . Two questions are raised by this fact.  Was the culture of Babylonia imported from abroad; and was Ea, its god of culture, of foreign extraction?” — p. 136
intercourse . . . between Chaldea and the Sinaitic peninsula . . .”
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “. . . there is now sufficient evidence to prove that at the very dawn of the historic period in Babylonia, maritime intercourse was being carried on between this country on the one hand and the Sinaitic Peninsula and India on the other.” — p. 136
“The Statues discovered . . . at Tel-loh . . .”
p/q: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “The statues discovered by M. de Sarzek at Tel-loh, which may be roughly dated about 4000 B.C., remind every traveller who has been in Egypt of the great diorite statue of king Khephren, the builder of the second pyramid of Gizeh . . . some of the Tel-loh statues are carved out of hard diorite stone.  Now one of the inscriptions . . . affirms that the stone was brought from the land of Magan . . . it signified the Sinaitic Peninsula.” — pp. 136-7
“the unit of measurement marked on the plan of the city . . .”
p/q: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “What clinches the matter is the fact observed by Mr. Petrie, that the unit of measurement marked on the plan of the city which one of the figures of Tel-loh carries upon its lap, is the same as the unit of measurement employed by the Pyramid builders.” — p. 137
an ancient Babylonian list of clothing mentions sindhu . . .”
see: A. H. Sayce, Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion, 1887: “Apart from the existence of teak in the ruins of Mugheir, an ancient Babylonian list of clothing mentions sindhu, or ‘muslin’ . . . the σινδών of the Greeks . . . shown by its Accadian equivalent, which is expressed by ideographs signifying literally ‘vegetable cloth.’ ” — pp. 137-8

— 227 —

verse 38, it must be read together with . . . Stanza IX
see: Stanza IX, 33-35: “Seeing which (the sin committed with the animals), the Lhas . . . who had not built men . . . wept, saying . . . ‘The Amanasa (themindless’) have defiled our future abodes . . . Let us dwell in the others.  Let us teach them better . . . Then all became endowed with Manas . . .’ ” — SD 2:191

— Footnotes

In “Man” . . . all that is said of the Atlanteans
see: Man: Fragments of Forgotten History [by Two Chelas], 1885: “The Fourth Race — Atlanteans,” pp. 74-88 (Chapter VI)
that race which became “black with sin”
see: Sampson Arnold Mackey, Mythological Astronomy, 1822-3: “The White Island has disappeared . . . ‘The Indians believe the White Island became black on account of the sins of the people!’ ” — p. 71 (Key of Urania)
see: Capt. F. Wilford, “An Essay on the Sacred Isles in the West,” 1808: “The Sacred Isles in the West, of which Sweta-dwīpa, or the White Island, is the principal, and the most famous, are, in fact, the holy land of the Hindus.”  “. . . in the present wicked age and degenerated times . . . the white island, is become black, on account of the sins of mankind.” — pp. 246, 302 (Asiatic Researches, v. 8)
the divine names of the Asuras
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “ASURA.  ‘Spiritual, divine.’  In the oldest parts of the Rig-veda this term is used for the supreme spirit . . . It afterwards acquired an entirely opposite meaning, and came to signify, as now, a demon or enemy of the gods.” — p. 27
“Asura was the generic appellation of all the Atlanteans . . .”
see: Man: Fragments of Forgotten History [by Two Chelas], 1885: “Asura was the generic appellation of all the Atlanteans, who were the enemies of the spiritual heroes of the Aryans (gods).” — p. 77

— 228 —

early conscious Beings, who . . . created by Kriyasakti the semi-Divine man . . .
see: Stanza VII, 27: “(Then) the Third (race) became the vahan (vehicle) of the Lords of Wisdom.  It created Sons of ‘Will and Yoga,’ by Kriyasakti . . . Ancestors of the Arhats.” — SD 2:172
We can choose . . . we have wisdom”
see: Stanza VII: “They saw the (intellectually) vile forms of the first third (still senseless Race) . . . ‘We can choose,’ said the Lords, ‘we have wisdom.’ ”  “. . . the ‘Lords of Wisdom’ are identical with the Hindu Devas, who refuse ‘to create’ . . . the Kumāras of the Hindu Pantheon and Purānas, those elder sons of Brahmā, ‘Sanandana and the other sons of Vedhas’ . . .” — SD 2:161, 172-3 (§§ 24, 27)

— 229 —

In Genesis (vi.) the “Sons of God” — B’ne Aleim . . .
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And it came to pass, when men began to multiply on the face of the earth, and daughters were born unto them, that the sons of God saw the daughters of men that they were fair; and they took them wives of all which they chose.” — p. 7 (Genesis, 6:1-2)
see: John Fleming, The Fallen Angels, 1879: “Interpretations of the terms Bne-Elohim and Bnoth-Adam. . . . (Bne-Ha-Elohim), rendered ‘sons of God’ — and . . . (Bnoth-Ha-Adam), ‘daughters of men’ . . .”  “Bne-ha-Elohim = Angels, till then unfallen . . . or, angels already fallen with Satan . . . The latter is stated to have been the view of the Cabbalistic Jews . . .” — pp. 9, 10
“Sons of God” . . . became enamoured of the daughters of men . . .
see: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883: “It happened after the sons of men had multiplied in those days, that daughters were born to them, elegant and beautiful. . . . when the angels, the sons of heaven, beheld them, they became enamoured of them, saying to each other, Come, let us select for ourselves wives . . .” — pp. 5-6 (vii.1-2)
and revealed to their wives the mysteries . . .
see: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883: “Then they took wives . . . teaching them sorcery, incantations . . .” — p. 7 (vii.10)
from which the author of Revelation . . . profusely quoted
see: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883: “In attestation of the relationship between the Book of Enoch and Christianity, we now collate its language and ideas with parallel passages in New Testament scripture.” — p. xxv (Introduction)
      [14 passages from Revelation are shown in parallel with verses from The Book of Enoch] — pp. xxvii-xxxiii
and even the St. John . . . (e.g. . . . “thieves and robbers”)
see: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883: “. . . the parable of the sheep, rescued by the good Shepherd from hireling guardians and ferocious wolves [John, 10:11-16], is obviously borrowed by the fourth Evangelist from Enoch lxxxix., in which the author depicts the shepherds as killing and destroying the sheep before the advent of their Lord, and thus discloses the true meaning of that hitherto mysterious passage . . . [John, 10:8] ‘All that ever came before me are thieves and robbers’ . . .” — p. xlviii (Introduction)
Book of Initiation . . . mysteries performed in the inner temples
see: Augustus Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries Among the Mayas and the Quiches, 1886: “It may be that its author . . . still retained in his heart of hearts a strong love for the ancient institutions . . . Fearing lest the learning of the priests of old and the knowledge he had acquired by his initiation into the mysteries should become lost . . . he put, for greater safety, in the mouth of Henoch, as instructing his son, what he had seen and learned in the secrecy of the temples.” — pp. 16-17

— Footnotes

the author of “Earth’s Earliest Ages” . . .
see: G. H. Pember, Earth’s Earliest Ages, “and their Connection with Modern Spiritualism and Theosophy,” 1884.
“Satan is the ‘Anointed Cherub’ of old . . .”
p/q: G. H. Pember, Earth’s Earliest Ages, 1884: “. . . Satan . . . is said to have been, by God’s appointment, the Anointed Cherub . . .”  “God created Satan the fairest and wisest of all His creatures in this part of His universe, and made him Prince of the World and of the Power of the Air.” — pp. 60, 64
“He was placed in an Eden . . . far anterior to the Eden of Genesis . . .”
p/q: G. H. Pember, Earth’s Earliest Ages, 1884: “He was placed in an Eden, or region of delight, which was both far anterior to the Eden of Genesis . . . and also, apparently, of an altogether different and more substantial character, resembling the New Jerusalem as described in the Apocalypse.” — p. 64
“Satan, being perfect in wisdom, and beauty . . .”
p/q: G. H. Pember, Earth’s Earliest Ages, 1884: “. . . Satan . . . being perfect in wisdom and beauty.  His vast empire . . . may not improbably comprehend the whole of our solar system.  Certainly no other angelic power of greater or even equal dignity has been revealed to us.  The Archangel Michael himself is quoted by Jude as preserving towards the Prince of Darkness the respect due to a superior, however wicked he may be, until God has formally commanded his deposition.” — p. 58
“Satan was from the moment of his creation . . .”
p/q: G. H. Pember, Earth’s Earliest Ages, 1884: “The meaning [Ezekiel, 28:13] . . . seems to be that Satan was from the moment of his creation surrounded by the insignia of royalty; that he awoke to consciousness to find the air filled with the rejoicing music of those whom God had appointed to stand before him.  In the next verse we seem to pass from the royalty of Satan to his priestly dignity.” — pp. 59-60
“Satan was also a priest of the Most High
p/q: G. H. Pember, Earth’s Earliest Ages, 1884: “He was also a priest of the Most High, and his place was at the footstool of the throne of God.” — p. 60 side note
The author notes the “avowed origin” (of Theosophy) . . .
p/q: G. H. Pember, Earth’s Earliest Ages, 1884: “The latter scheme, or spiritual evolution . . . is, under sundry disguises and with various modifications, insinuating itself in quarters where its rejection might have been deemed certain. . . . Should any of our readers be predisposed in favour of such a theory, we would entreat them to consider its pedigree as given in our chapter on Theosophy; to note its avowed origin from ‘descending angels,’ who can be none other than those Nephilim which the Bible mentions . . .” — p. vii (Preface)

— 229-30 —

“Visions” of Enoch relate to . . . initiation
p/q: Augustus Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries Among the Mayas and the Quiches, 1886: “Still, on reading the visions in the book of Henoch . . . one can scarcely refrain from believing that . . . the author relates his experience at the initiation, and what he learned in the mysteries before being converted to Christianity.” — p. 16

— 230 —

this book was written “at the beginning of the Christian era . . .”
p/q: Augustus Le Plongeon, Sacred Mysteries Among the Mayas and the Quiches, 1886: “That book is believed to have been written at the beginning of the Christian era, when . . . the customs and religion of the Egyptians fell into decadency . . .” — p. 16
Jude quotes . . . from the “Book of Enoch”
see: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883:
“En. ii. xxvi. 2. ‘Behold, he comes with ten thousands of his saints, to execute judgment upon them . . .”         “Jude 14, 15. ‘. . . Behold, the Lord cometh with ten thousands of his saints, to execute judgment upon all . . .” — p. xxxiii
“it could not have been the production of a writer . . .”
p/q: The Book of Enoch, tr. Richard Laurence, 1883: “ ‘That it could not have been the production of a writer who lived after the inspired authors of the New Testament, or who was even coeval with them, must be manifest from the quotation of St. Jude . . .’ ” — p. x
(Asuras) are also denounced as “the enemies of the gods” . . .
see: W. J. Wilkins, Hindu Mythology, 1882: “. . . throughout the later writings of the Hindus, the term ‘Asura’ is used only for the enemies of the gods. . . . The gods tried to sacrifice . . . [but were] interrupted at first by the Asuras . . .” — p. 366
The coluber tortuosus “the tortuous snake” . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Désigné chez les Hébreux par le nom de ‘serpent tortueux, coluber tortuosus’ [Described by the Hebrews by the name of ‘tortuous serpent, coluber tortuosus’] . . .” — 2:343
The “Serpent” fallen from on high, “deorsum fluens” . . .
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . serpent ‘tombé d’en haut, deorsum fluens,’ c’est lui qui possédait les ‘clefs de l’empire des morts, τοῦ θάνατοῦ ἀρχὴ,’ jusqu’au jour où, sous l’action de l’exorcisme du Sauveur, on le vit ‘tomber comme un éclair, cadebat ut fulgur’ [serpent ‘fallen from on high, flowing downward,’ he possessed the ‘keys to the kingdom of the dead’ until the day when, under the action of the exorcism of the Savior, he is seen ‘falling like lightning, cadebat ut fulgur’] . . .” — 2:343
Jesus saw it “falling like lightning from heaven”
see: The New Testament, cm. & notes by Adam Clarke, 1831: “. . . I [Jesus] beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven {Or . . . falling, as lightning}.” — 1:407 & fn. (Luke, 10:18)
even “the devils are subject” to the Logos — who is Wisdom
see: The Letters of Paul and Amicus [by Benjamin Ferris], 1823: “As ‘Cruden’ says: ‘the name of God signifies his wisdom, power and goodness.’ . . . When ‘the seventy returned with joy saying, Lord, even the Devils are subject unto us through thy name.’ Luke x. 17. . . . where the word ‘name’ occurs, it is evident, that reference is made to divine power . . .” — p. 447

— 231 —

“The Logos is passive Wisdom in Heaven . . .”
see: Qabbalah, tr. Isaac Myer, 1888: “. . . ’Hokhmah is the Son.  This Sephirah . . . proceeds from Kether the Father and Binah the Mother . . . its result being Wisdom or Knowledge. . . . ’Hokhmah is the Word, the Greek Logos . . .”  “. . . passive and receiving that from above . . . It is active and emanating to that which is below . . .” — pp. 262, 281
Marriage of “Heavenly man” with the “Virgin of the World”
see: Thrice-Greatest Hermes, tr. G. R. S. Mead, 1906: “But the chief of all the mysteries for Philo was . . . the Sacred Marriage, the mystic union of the soul, as female, with God, as male . . .”  “ ‘. . . the idea of the Word [Logos] . . . being born of an ever-virgin soul . . .’ ” — 1:216, 219 (Prolegomena, VIII)
with . . . Nature, as described in Pymander
see: Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1884: “But the Father . . . brought forth Man like unto himself . . . and breaking through the strength of the Circles . . . [he] made manifest the downward-born Nature . . . Nature presently laying hold of what it so much loved, did wholly wrap herself about it, and they were mingled, for they loved one another.” — pp. 10-11 (Poemander, §§ 18, 22, 25-6)
It is . . . the marriage of the lamb with his bride
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . the marriage of the Lamb is come, and his wife hath made herself ready.” — p. 336 (Revelation, 19:7)
see: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887: “. . . the ‘Marriage of the Lamb’ being equivalent of the . . . last and supremest of all the Acts of the Soul. . . . indicating the work of Manifestation, or Incarnation of Divine Being in ‘Creation.’ ” — p. 150 (vi.2)
That “wife” is now identified with the Church
see: Thomas Whittemore, Commentary on the Revelation of St. John, 1848: “The marriage of the Lamb is come. — The Lamb is, of course, Jesus . . . Christ, then, is the husband, and the church is his bride.” — p. 315 fn.
her linen may be fine and white . . .
see: Thomas Whittemore, Commentary on the Revelation of St. John, 1848: “And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints [Rev., 19:8] . . . {The church, the Lamb’s wife, was to be arrayed in fine linen. . . . It was an attire of honor, for it was worn by kings. . . . And moreover, it is said that it was clean and white, i.e. all pure . . . the church is without spot} . . .” — pp. 316-17 & fn.
rather the blood of the Saints she has “slain upon the earth”
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “Alas, alas, that great city, she that was clothed in fine linen . . .”  “. . . the voice of the bridegroom and of the bride shall be heard no more at all in thee . . . in her was found the blood of prophets, and of saints, and of all that were slain upon the earth.” — pp. 335-6 (Revelation, 18:16, 23-4)
the most pernicious of . . . dogmas.  (Vide . . . “Satanic Myths.”)
see: “The Origin of the Satanic Myth”: “This dogma, based as it is on chapter iii. of Genesis, is as illogical and unjust as it is paradoxical.”  “The ‘Serpent’ . . . is not Satan, but the bright Angel . . . who, promising the woman that if they ate of the forbidden fruit ‘ye shall not surely die,’ kept his promise, and made man immortal in his incorruptible nature.” — SD 2:387, 388

— Footnotes

“even the devils . . . are subject unto us through thy name”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “And the seventy returned with joy, saying, Lord, even the devils are subject unto us through thy name.” — p. 94 (Luke, 10:17)
“thy name” means . . . the spirit of true divine wisdom
see: The Letters of Paul and Amicus [by Benjamin Ferris], 1823: “ ‘. . . the name of God signifies his wisdom . . .’ ”  “[In] Luke x. 17. and in a hundred other places, where the word ‘name’ occurs, it is evident, that reference is made to divine power . . .” — p. 447
“. . . Satan . . . fall from heaven” . . . incarnation of the divine ray
see: W. J. Colville, “The Restoration of the Devil,” 1882: “Milton, founding his poem upon the enigmatical saying of the great teacher, ‘I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven’ . . . describes in the imagery common to poets . . . the descent of the spirit . . .” — pp. 5-6 (Berkeley Hall Lectures)
“No man knoweth who the Son is, but the Father . . .”
p/q: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “. . . no man knoweth who the Son is, but the Father; and who the Father is, but the Son . . .” — p. 94 (Luke, 10:22)
see: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887: “. . . the initiate of sacred mysteries . . . directs the force of his mind inwards . . . and knows even as he is known.  For as the apostle says again, ‘. . . the things of God no man knoweth, save the Spirit of God within the man.  And the Spirit knoweth all things and revealeth them unto the man.’ ” — pp. 7-8 (i.13)
Jesus forbade the twelve to go to the Gentiles . . .
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “These twelve Jesus sent forth, and commanded them, saying, Go not into the way of the Gentiles, and into any city of the Samaritans enter ye not . . .” — p. 12 (Matthew, 10:5)
the “mysteries of Heaven” were for them alone . . .
see: The Interlinear Bible, 1906: “Unto you it is given to know the mystery of the kingdom of God: but unto them that are without, all these things are done in parables . . .” — p. 49 (Mark, 4:11)
      “. . . great multitudes were gathered together . . . And he spake many things unto them in parables . . . And the disciples came, and said unto him, Why speakest thou unto them in parables? . . . Because it is given unto you to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it is not given.” — pp. 17-18 (Matthew, 13:2-3, 10-11)

— 232 —

Parâsara (Vishnu Purâna)
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “PARĀŚARA.  A Vedic Ṛishi . . . he received the Vishṇu Purāṇa from Pulastya . . .” — p. 229
      “PULASTYA.  One of the Prajā-patis or mind-born sons of Brahmā . . . He received the Vishṇu Purāṇa from Brahmā and communicated it to Parāśara, who made it known to mankind.” — p. 244
all those Rudras . . . born in every age . . . every Manvantara
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . there are a hundred appellations of the immeasurably mighty Rudras. . . . {In the beginning of the Kalpa, twelve gods, named Jayas, were created, by Brahmā, as his deputies and assistants in the creation.  They, lost in meditation, neglected his commands; on which he cursed them to be repeatedly born in each Manwantara}.” — 2:24-5, 26 fn. (i.15)
the flames . . .
see: Stanza III, 13: “These are then those ‘Flames’ (the Agnishwatta) who . . . ‘remain behind’ . . . But the true esoteric meaning is that most of them were destined to incarnate as the Egos of the forthcoming crop of Mankind.” — SD 2:79
as in Pymander . . . broken through the seven Circles of fire
see: Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1884: “But the Father of all things, the Mind, being Life and Light, brought forth Man like unto himself . . . [he] resolved to pierce and break through the Circumference of the Circles, and to understand the power of him that sits upon the Fire.” — p. 10 (Poemander, §§ 18, 21)
(See “The Fallen Angels” . . .)
see: “On the Myth of the ‘Fallen Angel,’ in its Various Aspects,” SD 2:475-505.
(See . . . “The Mystic Dragonsin Part II.)
see: “Allegories on the ‘War in Heaven’ ”
“Sarpas — Serpents — Nagas”
“The Myth of Bel and Merodach”
“The Sacredness of the Serpent” — SD 2:499-505

— Footnotes

“Pulastya,” a Prajâpati . . . progenitor of the Râkshasas
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Pulastya, a Prajāpati, son of Brahmā . . . Progenitor of the Rākshasas . . .” — 5(II):146
the grandfather of Ravana, the Great King of Lanka
see: John Dowson, Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology, 1879: “RĀVAṆA.  The demon king of Lankā . . . He was half-brother of Kuvera, and grandson of the Ṛishi Pulastya . . .” — p. 264
had, in a former birth, a son named Dattoli . . .
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Pulastya had, by Prīti, a son, called, in a former birth . . . Dattoli, who is now known as the sage Agastya.” — 1:154 (i.10)
Dattoli. . . . has six more variants . . . Dattâli, Dattotti . . .
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . Dattoli {Variants of this name are Dattāli, Dattotti, Dattotri, Dattobhri, Dambhobhi, and Dambholi} . . .” — 1:154 & fn. (i.10)
Parâsara . . . “sacrifice,” for the destruction of the Râkshasas
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Parāśara replied . . . I had heard that my father had been devoured by a Rākshasa . . . Violent anger seized me; and I commenced a sacrifice for the destruction of the Rākshasas.  Hundreds of them were reduced to ashes by the rite . . .” — 1:7 (i.1)
“Let no more of these unoffendingSpirits . . .’ be destroyed ”
p/q: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “. . . my grandfather Vasishṭha thus spake to me: Enough, my child . . . Let no more of these unoffending spirits of darkness be consumed.” — 1:7-8 (i.1)
(see for details Adiparvan, s. 176, Mahabhârata . . .)
see: Vishṇu Purāṇa, tr. Wilson, ed. Hall, 1864-77: “Sacrifice of Parāśara.  The story of Parāśara’s birth is narrated in detail in the Mahābhārata (Ādi Parvan, s. 176). . . . Parāśara . . . was brought up by his grandfather.  When he grew up, and was informed of his father’s death, he instituted a sacrifice for the destruction of all the Rākshasas, but was disuaded from its completion by Vasishṭha and other sages . . . The story is told in the Linga Purāṇa (Pūrvārdha, s. 64) in the same manner . . .” — 1:8-9 fn.

— 233 —

“And on the seventh day . . . there went forth . . . a mighty Angel . . .”
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887:
      “1. And on the seventh day there went forth from the presence of God a mighty Angel, full of wrath and consuming, and God gave unto him the dominion of the outermost sphere.
        2. Eternity brought forth Time; the Boundless gave birth to Limit; Being descended into Generation.
        3. As lightning I beheld Satan fall from heaven, splendid in strength and fury.
        4. Among the Gods is none like unto him, into whose hand are committed the kingdoms, the power and the glory of the worlds:
        5. Thrones and empires, the dynasties of kings, the fall of nations, the birth of churches, the triumphs of Time.” — p. 369 (“The Secret of Satan,” Appendix XV)
“Satan is the door-keeper of the Temple of the King . . .”
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887:
      “20. For Satan is the doorkeeper of the Temple of the King: he standeth in Solomon’s porch; he holdeth the Keys of the Sanctuary;
        21. That no man may enter therein save the anointed, having the arcanum of Hermes.” — pp. 370-1 (“The Secret of Satan,” Appendix XV)
Zeruana Akerne — Boundless Time
see: E. C. Ravenshaw, “On the Winged Bulls, Lions, and Other Symbolical Figures from Nineveh,” 1856: “. . . ‘Time without bounds,’ — ‘Zarua Akerene,’ described in the Zend-avesta, as ‘the ever-soaring bird’ . . . the winged circle came to be considered the symbol of Ormazd, the active creator . . .” — pp. 115-16 (Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, v. 16)

— Footnotes

“Now there are, and there must be, failures . . .”
p/q: The Mahatma Letters to A. P. Sinnett, comp. A. T. Barker, 1926: “Now there are — there must be ‘failures’ in the etherial races of the many classes of Dyan Chohans or Devas as well as among men.  But still as these failures are too far progressed and spiritualized to be thrown back forcibly from their Dyan Chohanship into the vortex of a new primordial evolution through the lower kingdoms — this then happens.  When a new solar system is to be evolved these Dyan Chohans are . . . born in by the influx ‘ahead’ of the elementals and remain as a latent or inactive spiritual force in the aura of the nascent world of a new system until the stage of human evolution is reached. . . . Then they become an active Force, and commingle with the Elementals, or progressed entities of the pure animal kingdom to develope little by little the full type of humanity.” — p. 87 (K.H., Letter XIV — “Supplementary Notes,” Received by A.O.H. July 9, 1882)

— 234 —

The “Anointed” . . . has the secrets and mysteries of Hermes
see: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887: “For Satan . . . holdeth the Keys of the Sanctuary . . . That no man may enter therein save the anointed, having the arcanum of Hermes.” — pp. 370-1 (Appendix XV, §§ 20-1)
“innumerable incarnations of Spirit” . . .
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887: “Thrones and empires, the dynasties of kings . . . They arise and pass . . .”  “The innumerable incarnations of Spirit . . . the ceaseless pulse and current of Desire . . .” — pp. 369, 370 (Appendix XV, §§ 5-6, 10)
“Many names hath God given him . . .”
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887:
      “12. Many names hath God given him, names of mystery, secret and terrible.
        13. God called him Satan the Adversary, because Matter opposeth Spirit, and Time accuseth even the saints of the Lord.” — p. 370
“Stand in awe of him, and sin not . . .”
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887:
      “28. Stand in awe of him and sin not: speak his name with trembling; and beseech God daily to deliver thee.
        29. For Satan is the magistrate of the Justice of God: he beareth the balance and the sword . . .
        31. For to him are committed Weight and Measure and Number.” — p. 371
the Rabbi, who explains the Kabala to Prince Al-Chazari
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “The Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “The prince Al-Chazari says to the Rabbi: ‘I wish now that thou wouldst impart to me some of the chiefest or leading principles of Natural Philosophy, which . . . were in former times worked out by them (the ancient wise ones)’ . . .” — p. 268 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
in the Book of that name
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “The Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “There is a running comment on this particular passage in the Book Al-Chazari, by Jehudah-ha-Levi . . . translations of which are to be had in German . . . one by Dr. David Cassel . . .” — p. 268 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
see: Jehuda ha-Levi, Das Buch Kusari, tr. & cm. David Cassel, 1869.
Weight and Measure and Number are, in Sepher Jezirah . . .
see: Jehuda ha-Levi, Das Buch Kusari, tr. & cm. David Cassel, 1869: “Dazu gehört das Sefer Jezira . . . Es lehrt die Göttlichkeit und Einheit . . . Längenmass, Hohlmass, Gewicht . . . Alles ist in der Zahl, d. h. im Sefar [To this belongs the Sēpher Yetsīrāh . . . It teaches divinity and unity . . . Measure of length, measure of volume, weight . . . all these are within the Number, that is, within Sephār].” — pp. 39-40 (iv.25)
Weight and Measure and Number are . . . (the three Sephrim . . .)
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “The Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “In setting forth his scheme . . . viz., the one word ‘Sephrim’ (Sephiroth), of the Number Jetzirah, the author explains the separation of this word into three subordinate ones . . .”  “ ‘It teaches the Alhim-ness (31415) and One-ness . . .’ (which, as every one knows, is the mathematical function of pi . . . which measures, weighs, and numbers the stars of heaven, and yet resolves them back into the final oneness of the Uni-verse) . . .” — pp. 268, 269 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
number of 10 . . . Sephiroth . . . the “Heavenly Man”
see: J. Ralston Skinner, “The Cabbalah — VI,” June 1886: “The foundation of the mystic books of the Cabbalah . . is made to rest upon the Ten Sephiroth, or the 10 Numbers . . . This 10 is the first Divine Manifestation . . . these Sephiroth were the numbers or emanations of the heavenly Light . . . the light of which they were the flux was the Heavenly man, the Adam-KDM . . .” — p. 266 (Masonic Review, v. 65)
Therefore . . . “Satan is the minister of God . . .”
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887: “33. Therefore Satan is the Minister of God, Lord of the seven mansions of Hades, the Angel of the manifest worlds.” — p. 371

— 234-5 —

“the first son, eldest of the gods,” . . .
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887: “The first andeldest of the godsin order of microcosmic evolution, Saturn (Satan) is the seventh and last in order of macrocosmic emanation, being the circumference of the kingdom of which Phœbus (wisdom) is the centre.” — p. 371 fn. (Appendix XV)

— 235 —

The Gnostics . . . calling the Jewish god “an angel of matter”
see: Pistis-Sophia, tr. G. R. S. Meade (& notes by Meade & HPB), May 15 & Aug. 15, 1890: “. . . Sophia . . . emanated Seventy Logoi, which are celestial Messengers (angels) . . . The Demiurge then, made bodies for the souls from the material (hylic) . . .”  “Ildabaôth or Ialdabaoth is . . . the Demiurge of the Valentinian system . . . Ildabaoth, the material creator, was identified with Jehovah and Saturn . . .” — p. 235 [cm.], p. 497 [cm.] (Lucifer, v. 6)
he who breathed (conscious) life into Adam
see: Pistis-Sophia, tr. G. R. S. Meade (& notes by Meade & HPB), Aug. 15, 1890: “And Ildabaoth to prevent his sons attending to the voice [of Sophia], proposed that they should fashion a man. . . . And they brought him to his father Ildabaoth, who breathed into him the ‘Breath of Life’ . . .” — p. 497 [cm.] (Lucifer, v. 6)
“And God hath put a girdle about his loins . . .”
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887: “34. And God hath put a girdle about his loins, and the name of the girdle is Death.” — p. 371 (Appendix XV)
“Upon Satan only is the shame of generation. . . .”
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887:
      “37. . . . upon him only is the shame of generation.
        38. He hath lost his virginal estate: uncovering heavenly secrets, he hath entered into bondage.
        39. He encompasseth with bonds and limits all things which are made . . .” — p. 372 (Appendix XV)
“Twain are the armies of God . . .”
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887:
      “42. Twain are the armies of God: in heaven the hosts of Michael; in the abyss the legions of Satan.
        43. These are the Unmanifest and the Manifest; the free and the bound; the virginal and the fallen.
        44. And both are the ministers of the Father, fulfilling the Word divine.” — p. 372 (Appendix XV)
“Holy is the Sabbath of god . . .”
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887: “55. Holy and venerable is the Sabbath of God: blessed and sanctified is the name of the Angel of Hades . . .” — p. 373 (Appendix XV)
“The glory of Satan is the shadow of the Lord” . . .
p/q: Kingsford & Maitland, The Perfect Way, 1887: “41. The glory of Satan is the shadow of the Lord: the throne of Satan is the footstool of Adonai.” — p. 372 (Appendix XV)
“the throne of Satan . . .”  (Vide Part II. . . .)
see: “Is Pleroma Satan’s Lair?”: “. . . Eliphas Lévi, describes Satan in the following glowing terms: — ‘It is that Angel who was . . . brave enough to buy his independence at the price of eternal suffering . . . strong enough to reign in darkness amidst agony, and to have built himself a throne on his inextinguishable pyre.’ ” — SD 2:506-7

— 236 —

symbolical meaning of the Serpent of Genesis
see: Hargrave Jennings, The Rosicrucians: Their Rites and Mysteries, 1887: “The Ophites are said to have maintained that the serpent of Genesis was the Λογος, and the ‘Saviour.’  The Logos was Divine Wisdom . . .”  “The serpent, in one view, was the emblem of the evil principle, or destroyer.  But, as we have seen before, the ‘destroyer’ was the ‘creator.’ ”  “The Destroyer or Serpent of Genesis is correctly the Renovator or Preserver.” — 1:273, 274, 275
“Sons of Wisdom” (or angels from higher spheres . . .)
see: Pistis-Sophia, tr. G. R. S. Meade (& notes by Meade & HPB), May 15 & Aug. 15, 1890: “. . . Sophia [Wisdom] . . . emanated Seventy Logoi, which are celestial Messengers (angels) . . .”  “Ildabaoth . . . was the son of Sophia . . . [he] gazed into the ‘purgations of matter’ below; and through them begot another son, Ophiomorphos, the serpent-formed, the spirit of all that is basest in matter.” — p. 235 [cm.], p. 497 [cm.] (Lucifer, v. 6)
the evolution . . . from the “Moyst Principle” — or the great Deep
see: The Divine Pymander, tr. Everard, 1850: “For there were in the Chaos, an infinite darkness in the Abyss or bottomless Depth . . . and there went out the Holy Light, and the Elements were coagulated . . . out of the moyst Substance.” — p. 18 (iii.3)
see: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes, tr. J. D. Chambers, 1882: “From the Light a certain Holy Word descended upon Nature, and a pure Fire sprang forth from the moist nature {Compare . . . Genesis i. 2: ‘And the earth was without form . . . and darkness upon the face of the deep’} . . .” — p. 2 & fn. (Poemandres, i.5)
First the “Universal Mind” . . . God, the Father
see: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes, tr. J. D. Chambers, 1882: “ ‘I am Mind, thy God, Who is before moist nature . . . The Mind, Father God . . .’ ” — pp. 2-3 (Poemandres, i.6)
“Heavenly Man” . . . the great Total of that Host of Angels
see: Theological and Philosophical Works of Hermes, tr. J. D. Chambers, 1882: “But the Mind, the God . . . begat by Word another Mind Creator, Who . . . created some Seven Administrators {‘The Seven Spirits of God . . . the Seven Angels which stand before God’} . . . Immediately from the downborne elements sprung forth The Word of The God to the pure creation of all Nature {By the Word of the Lord were the Heavens made, and all the host of them} . . .”  “But the Father of all things, The Mind . . . (engendered) a Man like to Himself . . .” — pp. 4-6 & fns. (Poemandres, i.9-10, 12)

— Footnotes [236-7]

For the Mind . . . brought forth by its Word . . .
p/q: Le Pimandre, cm. François Monsieur de Foix, 1579: “Mais pensée, Dieu abondant aux deux sexes, estant vie et lumiere, comme aucteur a produict avec son verbe l’autre pensée operantelaquelle estant Dieu de feu et d’esprit, a basti sept certains gouverneurs, comprenantz par leurs cercles le monde sensible, & leur disposition est nommée fatale destinée [But Mind, a deity abundant in two sexes, being life and light, has brought forth as a creator, by his Word, another Mind or Workman, which being the God of fire and spirit, fashioned seven Governors, containing in their circles the phenomenal world, and their disposition is called fatal destiny].” — p. 15 (ch. 1, sect. 9)

— 237 —

Logos, or “the Son who is one with the Father”
see: Augustine, Lectures on the Gospel of John, tr. James Innes, 1874: “. . . the self-same Son of God declares, ‘I and my Father are one’ [John, 10:30] . . . one they are, inasmuch as ‘The Word was God’ [John, 1:1] . . .” — 2:292 (lxxviii.2)
the Host of the Rectores Mundi
p/q: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “La dignité des ces qualifications . . . se confondre avec celles de la Divinité. . . . soutiens de l’univers (κοσμοκρατορες), recteurs du monde (rectores mundi), anges des sphères célestes [The dignity of these qualifications . . . blends with those of the deity . . . supporters of the universe (κοσμοκρατορες), rulers of the world (rectores mundi), angels of the celestial spheres] . . .” — 2:294
the seven “Angels of the Presence”
see: Calmet’s Dictionary of the Bible, 1830: “[In Revelation, viii.2- 3] St. John saw seven angels standing before the Lord.  In a very ancient book, ‘The Testament of the Twelve Patriarchs,’ they are called angels of the presence . . .” — 1:128
caput angelorum — and the magni consilii Angelus
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “. . . celui qui s’appelle ‘l’Ange du grand conseil,’ et qu’ils regardent comme leur chef et comme leur tête, caput angelorum et magni consilii angelus [the one who is called ‘the Angel of the great council,’ and whom they (the angels) consider their chief, caput angelorum (head of the angels) and angel of the great council] . . .” — 2:338
“The Gods became no-Gods, the Sura — A-sura”
see: Stanza X: “. . . the Third (Race) gave birth to the Fourth (Race men).  The gods became no-gods (Sura became a-Sura) . . . Up to this point of evolution man belongs more to metaphysical than physical nature.  It is only after the so-called Fall, that the races begin to develop rapidly into a purely human shape.” — SD 2:227
Pride and Presumption . . . are the causes . . .
see: R. B. Boswell, “The Evolution of Angels and Demons,” Aug. 1900: “Pride or presumption was the origin of the Devil’s condemnation according to the second century (?) writer of 1 Timothy (iii. 6) . . .” — p. 497 (Open Court, v. 14)
Pride . . . emptied heaven of one third of its divine denizens
see: J.-E. de Mirville, Des Esprits, 1863-8: “Un tiers du tsabaoth foudroyé [A third of the Host of Heaven was struck down] . . .”  “. . . une multitude innombrable d’anges . . . vinrent à oublier leur Créateur, et . . . s’imaginèrent du fond de leur orgueil que personne ne leur pourrait résister [an innumerable multitude of angels . . . came to forget their Creator, and . . . imagined in the depths of their pride that no one could resist them].” — 2:340, 344 fn.

— Footnotes

Prometheus . . . hurled down to the bottomless pit
see: Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, ed. James Davies, 1862: “The play closes amidst the thunders, and lightning, and wrack of elements, in which Prometheus