Theosophical University Press Online Edition

The Splendor of the Soul

by Katherine Tingley


The Splendor of the Soul is a new collection and revision of material originally published in 1927 and 1928. Copyright © 1996 by Theosophical University Press. Electronic version ISBN 1-55700-060-3. All rights reserved. This edition may be downloaded for off-line viewing without charge. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted for commercial or other use in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission of Theosophical University Press. For ease of searching, no diacritical marks appear in the electronic version of the text.


Contents

1. The Voice of the Soul (56K)

2. The Perfectibility of Man (17K)

3. The Real Man (14K)

4. The Sacredness of Marriage and the Real Child (18K)

5. Self-Analysis (11K)

6. The Splendor of the Inner Life of Man (13K)

7. Spiritual Awakening (13K)

8. Prosperity and the Poverty of Our Ideals (15K)

9. Does Theosophy Build or Destroy? (15K)

10. Against Capital Punishment (21K)

11. The Challenge of the Hour (9K)


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About the Author: Katherine Tingley was leader of the Theosophical Society (then named the Universal Brotherhood and Theosophical Society) from 1896 to 1929, and is remembered particularly for her educational and social reform work centered at the Society's international headquarters at Point Loma, California. This book has been compiled from material in her The Voice of the Soul and The Travail of the Soul, both long out of print. The chapters are virtually verbatim transcripts of lectures given by the author in the late 1920s, which have now been edited to modernize punctuation and to remove dated references and repetition. The usage of "man" and "men" to include members of both sexes has been retained.