Theosophy – October 1896

FRAGMENTS: I — Cavé

I.

If you have patience and devotion you will understand these things, especially if you think much of them and meditate on them, for you have no conception of the power of meditation.

II.

Beware of anger, beware of vanity, beware too of self-depreciation, these are all lions in your path. Live each day, and each moment in the day, by the light within, fixing your gaze upon it with faith and love. When the hours of darkness come and you see it not, wait in patience and contentment, knowing it still burns and that when morning dawns, if your watch has been constant, you will see it burning, perchance more brightly than before. "The darkest hour is before the dawn;" grieve not therefore nor feel one moment's disquietude. Your lamp is lit, tend it faithfully, it matters not that the outer eyes do not behold it. Those who know and love you can always see it, and it may also be shining in some other heart which as yet has no light of its own. * * *

The Lodge waits and watches ever, and ever, ever works — think you not we have patience? — and those who serve us must do the same. You are right, no detail is overlooked. Life is made up of details, each a step in the ladder, therefore who shall dare say they are "small!" * * *

We are closer than you know, and love and thought bring us still nearer.

Kill out doubt which rises within; that is not yourself, you know! The doubt is a maya, cast it aside, listen not to its voice which whispers low, working on your lack of self-confidence. Therefore I say have neither vanity nor self-depreciation. If you are the Higher Self, you are all that is great, but since your daily consciousness is far, far below, look at the matter frankly and impartially. * * * Vex yourself not with contradictions. You know that you must stand alone: stand therefore! * * *

Keep yourself high, and strengthen your faith. * * *

By your own supreme act of faith, you must claim and hold these things.

III.

Let not Humility, that tender presence, become a stumbling block. In so doing you sin against the Higher Self.

IV.

Closer insight gives heavier responsibility — do not forget that, — and a responsibility which affects others more than it does yourself. See to it then that the outer does not obscure the inner, for your lamp must be carried aloft for others to see, or not seeing it, to continually feel. * * *

Do not confuse the outer with the inner therefore. Though the outer be full and rich remember it is so because of the inner shining through, and look ever back to that which shines. No sorrow, no disappointment lie there, but a fullness of realization of which you have no conception and a power and strength which shall lift you above these confusions to a sure place of your own. You have been too harsh with your lower nature, that leads to dangerous reactions. Quiet, steady effort is far better, casting aside all thought of results. Treat your mind as a child, lead it firmly but gently and in all ways and at all times strengthen your faith.

V.

Your instrument must not be like another's instrument — no need to duplicate these. It is your special kind which is needed and wherein you differ from others is not where you fail but where, if perfected, you may do your own special work which they cannot do.

VI.

Through these tears of blood you will learn; through this suffering you will gain the power to aid your fellows. What to you is the approbation or disapprobation of any one? Work and wait on and all will be well.

VII.

Sink into the very depths of your being, you will find all there. He a follower of no man, follow the inner voice.


Theosophy

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